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May 23, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia's new defense minister, facing the press Friday for the first time, made it clear that although he plans to cut the military in half, his real goal is to shape his country's young men into the proud soldiers of Russia's past. "Russia should have armed forces commensurate with Russia's status as a great power," Gen. Pavel S. Grachev, the defense minister, told reporters. After briefly outlining the strategy to reform Russia's armed forces and shrink them to about 1.
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NEWS
July 9, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Two Russian soldiers opened fire on fellow servicemen guarding their unit, killing six and fleeing before being captured by police, who staged a traffic jam to prevent their escape, authorities said. The soldiers of an engineering unit in the town of Kamensk-Shakhtinskiy in southern Russia attacked the guards and then fled with two automatic rifles and 1,000 rounds of ammunition, an Interior Ministry spokesman said.
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NEWS
June 14, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rebuffed by the president and Parliament in an appeal for a bigger budget, Defense Minister Pavel S. Grachev said Monday that he will cut Russia's armed forces from 2.2 million to 1.9 million personnel by Oct. 1. The planned retrenchment would mean an army with 200,000 fewer members than the force that Grachev defined six months ago as the minimum Russia needed to guarantee its security. Grachev reported the planned cuts in brief remarks to the Russian news agency Interfax.
NEWS
June 5, 2001 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The general commanding Russia's military campaign against separatist Chechnya called Monday for the public hanging of Chechen rebels, remarks that reflected Russia's growing frustration with the stalemated war. "[Do they deserve] a life sentence?" Gen. Gennady Troshev said in an interview published in Monday's Izvestia newspaper. "Under no circumstances! They deserve the most torturous death possible.
NEWS
March 19, 1995 | MATT BIVENS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If Russian forces have suffered heavy casualties in their three-month war with secessionist Chechnya, they can start by thanking themselves. Across the breakaway republic, Russian troops are selling weapons to the very rebels they have been sent to defeat. "It's nonsense. They sell us weapons that are used to kill them," said Lom-Ali Shamayev, a 34-year-old Chechen businessman with a New York address who bankrolls his own band of 116 guerrillas.
NEWS
September 9, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Russian President Vladimir V. Putin determined to reform his nation's military, Defense Minister Igor D. Sergeyev on Friday confirmed plans to sharply reduce the number of armed forces personnel over the next 2 1/2 years. Military forces will be reduced by about 350,000 people from their estimated strength of 1.2 million.
NEWS
January 28, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A soldier high on acetone fumes went on a rampage and killed seven fellow servicemen at a remote base on the Pacific island of Sakhalin, military officials reported Tuesday in describing the latest of at least 10 multiple slayings in the disintegrating army over the past two years.
NEWS
February 8, 1997 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia's armed forces are so broke and in such a state of decay that they soon may not be able to guarantee the security of one of the world's largest nuclear arsenals nor even defend their country, top officials acknowledged Friday. "The worst thing of all is that I, the defense minister, am presiding over destructive processes in the army and can do nothing about it," Defense Minister Igor N. Rodionov said at a news conference.
NEWS
July 18, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What if they formed an army but nobody joined? That's been the problem this year in Russia. Just last week, Lt. Gen. Vladimir Bondartsev, the military's deputy chief for mobilization, announced that Russia's armed forces are running more than 700,000 soldiers, aviators and sailors short. Only 51% of the privates' and sergeants' jobs that were to be filled through the spring 1993 call-up actually were, the worried general disclosed.
NEWS
October 8, 1999 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Russia's new war in Chechnya gains force and casualties mount, the Chechens are using the Internet to publicize their version of the story and their claims of civilian casualties. On the opposite side, Prime Minister Vladimir V. Putin has taken personal control of Russia's effort in the propaganda war, launching a new government information center. Putin's move underscores the high stakes for him in the renewed Chechen war.
NEWS
April 21, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A series of mine explosions and clashes with rebels in the breakaway republic of Chechnya killed 21 Russian servicemen and wounded at least 40, an official said. The casualties occurred during a 24-hour period in several parts of Chechnya, including the capital, Grozny, the official in the region's pro-Russian government said on condition of anonymity.
NEWS
March 14, 2001 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Said-Alvi Luluyev is a judge. He believes in the law. He even believes in justice. He just doesn't believe they are possible in Russia. Luluyev's 40-year-old wife, Nura, left their home in the Chechen town of Gudermes on June 3 to sell strawberries in Grozny, the republic's capital. She was detained by masked and armed Russian servicemen, who took her away in an armored personnel carrier.
NEWS
February 24, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They are 19 lost boys, orphaned, abandoned or sent away. Blank-faced, they march like windup toy soldiers around the snowy parade ground at the military unit that is home. But the smallest pair of boots is out of step. With a pathos that could melt icy hearts, the youngest boy, 12-year-old Boris Vorobyov, skips to regain the pace, his face rigid with determination. He soon falls out of step again, battling to fit in.
NEWS
January 19, 2001 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's a word that makes Lt. Gen. Vladimir Shamanov smile. That word is "cruel." Perhaps Shamanov smiles because he's heard it before, that he was reputed to be "the cruelest general in Chechnya." Perhaps he smiles because he doesn't really mind the reputation. For whatever reason, he smiles, and then answers the question in a voice that booms like artillery fire. "I called in tanks to fire on the locations that were firing on us," he says.
NEWS
January 16, 2001 | Reuters
The nation's top human rights envoy for Chechnya pledged to European monitors Monday that Moscow will prosecute more troops charged with committing abuses in the breakaway republic. During a visit by a parliamentary delegation of the Council of Europe, Vladimir A. Kalamanov vowed to narrow the gap between the high number of complaints and the small number of cases that make it to the court system.
NEWS
November 10, 2000 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Vladimir V. Putin signed a hard-nosed decree Thursday designed to shrink the country's bloated and decrepit armed forces to an affordable and effective size. "It has taken us a long time to arrive at this decision, and our time has run out," Putin said. "Today we must act. The future of the army, and the military organization of the country as a whole, depends on it."
NEWS
July 18, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Their fathers and older brothers, pampered sons of socialism, held entire nations of Europe and Asia in thrall and brought hostile nuclear weapons to within 90 miles of America's shores. Today, Russian officers like a major who asks to be called only Leonid worry less about fighting for the motherland than their own economic survival. Leonid, 43, who has two daughters and a granddaughter, moonlights as a Moscow taxi driver to earn an extra $5 a day.
NEWS
May 8, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin issued a decree Thursday creating Russia's own armed forces and making himself commander in chief, and he immediately ordered plans drawn up for the mighty force's reduction and conversion to a volunteer army. Yeltsin's decree means the task of reshaping and cutting the ex-Soviet armed forces quartered in and outside Russia--troops who still wear the Soviet hammer and sickle on their hats--can begin in earnest.
NEWS
October 26, 2000 | From Associated Press
A Russian Defense Ministry plane carrying at least 75 people slammed into a mountain while trying to land in bad weather Wednesday evening in Georgia. Officials said everyone on board was feared dead. A search and rescue team sent to the crash site about 15 miles east of the Black Sea port of Batumi found pieces of the plane and scorched earth, Georgia's Emergency Situations Department said.
NEWS
October 15, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Chechen rebels challenged tighter security measures in Grozny, the Chechen capital, with hit-and-run attacks and ambushes, killing four soldiers and wounding seven in the rebellious Russian republic, officials said. Fighters opened fire with pistols on a Russian military truck at a market in Grozny, killing three soldiers, an official in the pro-Russian Chechen administration said on condition of anonymity.
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