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Russia Armed Forces Yugoslavia

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NEWS
June 15, 1999 | Reuters
About 100 Russian peacekeeping troops waiting since Saturday to cross into Yugoslavia to join their countrymen in Kosovo returned to their base in northeastern Bosnia on Monday. A spokesman for the Stabilization Force said the commander of the 1,300-strong Russian brigade had not received orders to send the resupply convoy to the airport of Kosovo's capital, Pristina.
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NEWS
July 11, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
Russian troops deployed for the first time as part of the Kosovo peace force Saturday to cheers from Serbs, jeers from Albanians and a shooting incident to underscore the tension in the province. A unit of Russian paratroopers drove into a heavily damaged cement factory on the outskirts of the town of Kosovska Kamenica to take over from U.S. soldiers who had been using the building. "If this facility was good enough for the Marines, it is good enough for us," said Russian Lt. Col.
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NEWS
June 15, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a contingent of Russian troops rolled into Kosovo over the weekend, the audacious maneuver capped a three-month campaign by Russia to maintain its place on the world stage in the face of NATO's growing power. First by mounting vitriolic protests against NATO's bombing of Yugoslavia, then by launching a diplomatic effort to mediate the conflict and finally by sending in troops, Russia has demonstrated that it wants to be a player--no matter how sick its economy and its president.
NEWS
June 16, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia may have stunned the West by moving troops into Kosovo ahead of NATO, but it became apparent Tuesday that Moscow gave little thought to how it would sustain its island of 200 soldiers in a sea of NATO troops. Russian news services reported Tuesday that the paratroopers holding the airport outside Pristina, Kosovo's capital, were running low on food and fuel only four days into their standoff. Even worse, the soldiers had already run out of cigarettes.
NEWS
June 16, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia may have stunned the West by moving troops into Kosovo ahead of NATO, but it became apparent Tuesday that Moscow gave little thought to how it would sustain its island of 200 soldiers in a sea of NATO troops. Russian news services reported Tuesday that the paratroopers holding the airport outside Pristina, Kosovo's capital, were running low on food and fuel only four days into their standoff. Even worse, the soldiers had already run out of cigarettes.
NEWS
July 11, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
Russian troops deployed for the first time as part of the Kosovo peace force Saturday to cheers from Serbs, jeers from Albanians and a shooting incident to underscore the tension in the province. A unit of Russian paratroopers drove into a heavily damaged cement factory on the outskirts of the town of Kosovska Kamenica to take over from U.S. soldiers who had been using the building. "If this facility was good enough for the Marines, it is good enough for us," said Russian Lt. Col.
NEWS
June 15, 1999 | Reuters
About 100 Russian peacekeeping troops waiting since Saturday to cross into Yugoslavia to join their countrymen in Kosovo returned to their base in northeastern Bosnia on Monday. A spokesman for the Stabilization Force said the commander of the 1,300-strong Russian brigade had not received orders to send the resupply convoy to the airport of Kosovo's capital, Pristina.
NEWS
June 15, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a contingent of Russian troops rolled into Kosovo over the weekend, the audacious maneuver capped a three-month campaign by Russia to maintain its place on the world stage in the face of NATO's growing power. First by mounting vitriolic protests against NATO's bombing of Yugoslavia, then by launching a diplomatic effort to mediate the conflict and finally by sending in troops, Russia has demonstrated that it wants to be a player--no matter how sick its economy and its president.
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