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NEWS
May 9, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
Russian forces claimed Monday to have killed 20 Chechen guerrillas but lost a reconnaissance jet, possibly to rebel fire. The insurgents were killed in artillery and airstrikes, the military claimed. Russian forces are trying to rout Chechen rebels from mountain strongholds, but sniping and hit-and-run attacks continue. A Russian Su-24MR plane disappeared from radar screens during bad weather Sunday over Chechnya, and military officials said it may have been shot down.
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NEWS
May 24, 1997 | From a Times Staff Writer
President Boris N. Yeltsin's administration on Friday announced a surprise switch in appointments to the troubled military hierarchy, naming the commander of forces responsible for defending Russia against Chechen insurgents as the acting army chief of staff. Col. Gen.
NEWS
August 7, 1996 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Separatists in Chechnya stormed the region's Russian-controlled capital and two nearby towns at dawn Tuesday, dealing Boris N. Yeltsin a stinging blow as he prepared for his inauguration this week after winning a second term as Russia's president. Russian tanks and armored personnel carriers scuttled out of the scorched ruins of Grozny as Chechen fighters swept back into the town they lost last year, seizing administrative buildings in most of the capital's districts.
NEWS
August 28, 1996 | From Associated Press
Federal military commanders agreed Tuesday to resume withdrawing troops from Chechnya, propping up a shaky truce in the 20-month war that had been threatened by a dispute over missing guns. Truckloads of gloomy Russian soldiers poured out of the shattered capital, Grozny, and the nearby region of Vedeno. Tired but jubilant Chechen rebels celebrated in the streets. A bearded rebel fighter wearing blue fatigues was barely able to contain his joy.
NEWS
August 23, 1996 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Struggling to pacify his own troops as well as those of the enemy, Russian security chief Alexander I. Lebed announced a new, more detailed cease-fire Thursday with separatist rebels in Chechnya, but hopes for peace were undermined again by criticism of him from President Boris N. Yeltsin.
NEWS
August 9, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Casting a bloody, embarrassing backdrop for today's inauguration of Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin, Chechen rebels held off the vast forces of the federal army for a third day Thursday in a fierce battle for control of Chechnya's ragged capital, Grozny. One armored unit managed to break through the rebel cordon in the morning and beat back attacks aimed at taking the main government building.
NEWS
June 2, 1996 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite a cease-fire that was scheduled to go into effect in Chechnya on Saturday, fighting broke out in the war-torn republic and Russian authorities accused Chechen rebels of breaking the truce. An agreement to stop all hostilities had been negotiated in a Kremlin meeting last week, with Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin presiding over the talks with Chechen leaders.
NEWS
April 12, 1996 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eleven fruitless days after President Boris N. Yeltsin unveiled a peace plan for Chechnya, his strategy for ending the war was wedged Thursday between a Russian army commander who vowed to "smash" the rebels if they do not surrender and a political ally who urged the president to talk directly with Chechen separatist leader Dzhokar M. Dudayev.
NEWS
April 3, 1996 | Associated Press
Russian commanders insisted Tuesday that they were sticking to President Boris N. Yeltsin's plan to end the offensive in Chechnya despite deadly clashes between Russian troops and rebel fighters. Thirty separatist fighters reportedly died in one battle, but Russian commanders said their troops will keep their promise to shoot only in self-defense. Meanwhile, Chechen rebel leader Dzhokar M. Dudayev ridiculed Yeltsin's cease-fire decree.
NEWS
December 19, 1996 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Chechen warlord freed 22 Russian police officers unharmed Wednesday, ending a four-day outburst in Chechnya that had threatened to stall Russia's troop withdrawal from the separatist republic. As the men left their captors' outpost with a Kremlin negotiator, the Red Cross suspended relief work in Chechnya and evacuated its remaining foreign staffers after the slayings Tuesday of six of its aid workers.
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