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NEWS
July 16, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The Clinton administration said it will penalize up to nine Russian enterprises found to have sold sensitive technology to Iran, Libya or North Korea that could be used for weapons of mass destruction. At the same time, the White House applauded the Russian government for establishing an investigative commission that uncovered the illicit exports. The commission threatened administrative and criminal charges against the enterprises, the Itar-Tass news agency reported in Moscow. The U.S.
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NEWS
November 28, 1998 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House is growing increasingly worried that Russia's political and economic crises will increase the flow of nuclear technology and know-how out of the former Soviet Union from a trickle to a flood. One of President Clinton's top foreign policy advisors said this week that there is a danger that the "leakage" of nuclear technology from Russia, which began with the breakup of the Soviet Union at the end of 1991, could become a "hemorrhage."
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NEWS
May 22, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Swords into plowshares" may be the lofty motto of disarmament advocates now that the Cold War frost has melted, but "guns into greenbacks" is closer to the truth in Russia. Despite a glut in the global arms market, Russia expects to export at least 50% more weaponry this year than last, and it is looking to this trade boom to finance a revival of its bankrupt defense plants.
NEWS
July 16, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The Clinton administration said it will penalize up to nine Russian enterprises found to have sold sensitive technology to Iran, Libya or North Korea that could be used for weapons of mass destruction. At the same time, the White House applauded the Russian government for establishing an investigative commission that uncovered the illicit exports. The commission threatened administrative and criminal charges against the enterprises, the Itar-Tass news agency reported in Moscow. The U.S.
NEWS
February 12, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One sure sign the Cold War is really over: Russia now offers cash-paying customers a 10-year warranty on its latest surface-to-air missile. The mobile, high-speed S-300 PMU-1 air defense system, a rival of the American Patriot missile, is one of Moscow's hot new exports. Its creators claim that it can fend off "any type of air attack" within a radius of 95 miles and hit six targets at once.
NEWS
November 28, 1998 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House is growing increasingly worried that Russia's political and economic crises will increase the flow of nuclear technology and know-how out of the former Soviet Union from a trickle to a flood. One of President Clinton's top foreign policy advisors said this week that there is a danger that the "leakage" of nuclear technology from Russia, which began with the breakup of the Soviet Union at the end of 1991, could become a "hemorrhage."
NEWS
January 11, 1992 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
Iran's massive new arms buildup, a Libyan attempt to hire Russian nuclear experts and reports that Iran purchased three nuclear weapons have heightened fears here that the Soviet Union's breakup will spur nuclear proliferation and enable terrorists to acquire weapons of mass destruction. U.S.
NEWS
April 13, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Relations between the United States and Russia rebounded Thursday, just three weeks after each ordered out suspected spies from the other side, as the two governments announced plans for the first summit between Presidents Bush and Vladimir V. Putin. The meeting will be held soon and no later than the July summit in Italy of the Group of 8 industrialized nations, Secretary of State Colin L. Powell said after breakfast talks here with Foreign Minister Igor S. Ivanov.
NEWS
April 6, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an announcement meant to end mixed signals from the Kremlin, the Foreign Ministry said Tuesday that Russia plans to go ahead and sign on to NATO's Partnership for Peace program by the end of this month. President Boris N. Yeltsin's spokesman had warned last week that Yeltsin was having second thoughts about joining the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's loose affiliation designed for former Warsaw Pact members.
NEWS
June 10, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush faces the toughest diplomatic challenge of his presidency this week in Europe, where America's allies are increasingly wary of the new administration's determination to plow ahead with its own agenda--ignoring or denying growing differences with its most important partners in security, trade and diplomacy. The 15 predominantly center-left governments in the European Union have expressed varying degrees of alarm over the Bush administration's conservative goals.
NEWS
May 22, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Swords into plowshares" may be the lofty motto of disarmament advocates now that the Cold War frost has melted, but "guns into greenbacks" is closer to the truth in Russia. Despite a glut in the global arms market, Russia expects to export at least 50% more weaponry this year than last, and it is looking to this trade boom to finance a revival of its bankrupt defense plants.
NEWS
February 12, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One sure sign the Cold War is really over: Russia now offers cash-paying customers a 10-year warranty on its latest surface-to-air missile. The mobile, high-speed S-300 PMU-1 air defense system, a rival of the American Patriot missile, is one of Moscow's hot new exports. Its creators claim that it can fend off "any type of air attack" within a radius of 95 miles and hit six targets at once.
NEWS
January 11, 1992 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
Iran's massive new arms buildup, a Libyan attempt to hire Russian nuclear experts and reports that Iran purchased three nuclear weapons have heightened fears here that the Soviet Union's breakup will spur nuclear proliferation and enable terrorists to acquire weapons of mass destruction. U.S.
WORLD
May 15, 2002 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
NATO took another important step closer to Russia on Tuesday with an agreement that will give the West's former Cold War foe a new consultative role and greater influence within the alliance. Ministers from the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and Russia completed final details of a deal that will bring the two sides together to work on such issues as counter-terrorism, arms control, regional crises and natural catastrophes.
NEWS
October 24, 2000 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
Until recently, Vice President Al Gore yearned to draw attention to his close working relationship with then-Russian Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin--evidence, aides said, that Gore had the foreign policy stature to be president. So the vice president's office issued glossy reports on the work of the Gore-Chernomyrdin Commission. He held briefings for reporters and members of Congress (few attended).
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