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August 4, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this city that for centuries has been the literary font of Russia, Tamara Nikitina worked for 35 years at a major library without ever finding a word from the works of her favorite poet. To read the cherished verses of Anna Akhmatova during the Soviet era, brave admirers such as Nikitina had to borrow flimsy, tattered pages of underground manuscripts from the most trusted of friends and then smuggle them home for clandestine perusal out of sight of the thought police.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2008 | From the Associated Press
A sweeping government audit has revealed that up to 50,000 pieces are missing from Russia's museums -- everything from Pre-Revolutionary medals and weapons to precious works of art -- a member of the survey team said Thursday. Former Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered the survey after his government was deeply embarrassed in 2006 by hundreds of thefts from the crown jewel of Russia's art world, St. Petersburg's Hermitage gallery. More than 1,600 museums have been inspected since then, and most of them have items missing, Interior Ministry Col. Ilya Ryasnoi said in a telephone interview.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2008 | From the Associated Press
A sweeping government audit has revealed that up to 50,000 pieces are missing from Russia's museums -- everything from Pre-Revolutionary medals and weapons to precious works of art -- a member of the survey team said Thursday. Former Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered the survey after his government was deeply embarrassed in 2006 by hundreds of thefts from the crown jewel of Russia's art world, St. Petersburg's Hermitage gallery. More than 1,600 museums have been inspected since then, and most of them have items missing, Interior Ministry Col. Ilya Ryasnoi said in a telephone interview.
NEWS
August 4, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this city that for centuries has been the literary font of Russia, Tamara Nikitina worked for 35 years at a major library without ever finding a word from the works of her favorite poet. To read the cherished verses of Anna Akhmatova during the Soviet era, brave admirers such as Nikitina had to borrow flimsy, tattered pages of underground manuscripts from the most trusted of friends and then smuggle them home for clandestine perusal out of sight of the thought police.
NEWS
January 25, 1994 | MATT BIVENS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of the world's greatest museums was nearly destroyed a few months ago by a forgotten cup of tea. A worker in the fabric section of the Hermitage's Russian History Department had plugged in an electric tea kettle but then forgot about it. The water boiled away, the kettle burned up, the curtains caught fire, and suddenly the Hermitage--home of Rembrandt and Rodin, Matisse and Manet, Scythian gold and Egyptian sarcophagi--was in mortal danger.
NEWS
May 15, 1991 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia before 1917 was a thriving capitalist marketplace, a bourgeois society where exotic meals, lavish theater and the latest Western fashions were pursued as eagerly as Gorbachev's ouster is today. It was a world where emerging artist Kazimir Malevich pooled his talent with poet Vladimir Mayakovsky to design cartoon-like prints that chronicled World War I for the uneducated masses.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1998 | JOHN HENKEN
Whatever the political or economic turmoil in Russia, performing arts remain a reliable export with strong foreign markets. This weekend a 30-year-old ensemble making its U.S. debut, the St. Petersburg State Symphony, capped a five-day Tchaikovsky Festival at the Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts with two programs devoted to the composer. Not its hometown's most noted band, the State Symphony played with a sort of wary confidence under music director Ravel Martynov.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1994 | LEE MARGULIES, TIMES TELEVISION EDITOR
KCAL-TV Channel 9 was the big winner in the 46th annual Los Angeles Area Emmy Awards, picking up 13 statuettes Saturday night--five more than its closest competitor. But it failed to capture the coveted award for best hourlong newscast. Instead, in the equivalent of a movie winning the Oscar as best picture without collecting any honors for its writer, director or actors, KTTV-TV Channel 11's "Fox News at Ten" was named the best 60-minute newscast on local television during 1993. The 10 p.m.
NEWS
February 15, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the cavernous lobby of the 89-year-old Khudozhestvenny cinema at the head of historic Arbat Street, plush crimson theater chairs nest in rows across the marble floor like dominoes as they await installation. Brass-edged glass ticket booths and a state-of-the-art sound system are the next investments planned at the 600-seat cinema--one of only a handful in Moscow drawing enough moviegoers to bankroll its own floor-to-ceiling renovation.
NEWS
January 25, 1994 | MATT BIVENS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of the world's greatest museums was nearly destroyed a few months ago by a forgotten cup of tea. A worker in the fabric section of the Hermitage's Russian History Department had plugged in an electric tea kettle but then forgot about it. The water boiled away, the kettle burned up, the curtains caught fire, and suddenly the Hermitage--home of Rembrandt and Rodin, Matisse and Manet, Scythian gold and Egyptian sarcophagi--was in mortal danger.
NEWS
May 15, 1991 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia before 1917 was a thriving capitalist marketplace, a bourgeois society where exotic meals, lavish theater and the latest Western fashions were pursued as eagerly as Gorbachev's ouster is today. It was a world where emerging artist Kazimir Malevich pooled his talent with poet Vladimir Mayakovsky to design cartoon-like prints that chronicled World War I for the uneducated masses.
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