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BUSINESS
June 6, 1999 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia is everyone's Y2K nightmare--a deteriorating nation with dozens of outdated nuclear power plants and a dangerous arsenal of nuclear weapons. Although Russia woke late to the danger, though, the fact that it has far fewer computerized systems than most Western countries gives this otherwise backward country a significant advantage in preparing for the triple-zero day. "In the 1970s, the United States took a giant leap into computers," said Vyacheslav I.
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BUSINESS
November 19, 2007 | Chris Baldwin, Reuters
After building a chain of restaurants selling pizza to the Siberians, Eric Shogren has a few tips for foreigners wanting to break into the booming Russian market. Good contacts and respect for the Russian way of doing things are essential. And don't assume Western business practices and ideas are always relevant, says the U.S. citizen. "I'm out here selling Russians pizza left and right.
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NEWS
December 24, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five years ago, Alexei Vlasov was a promising young cardiologist doing research in biotechnology. Today he's a venture capitalist. Two years ago, Andrei Tikhotsky was a plasma physicist studying the behavior of particles in super-heated gases contained by magnetic fields. Now he's a banker. The "brain drain" of bright minds from Russian science has swelled to a torrent.
WORLD
February 2, 2005 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
Russia had grudging congratulations this week for the election in Iraq, but President Vladimir V. Putin is making it increasingly clear that the Kremlin does not intend to let the U.S. dictate the future landscape of the Middle East. In meetings with leaders of Syria and the Palestinian Authority, Russian officials have asserted their nation's historic role as a counterweight to American diplomacy in the region and hinted that Moscow, which opposed the U.S.
BUSINESS
April 28, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Swindled home buyers are legion in the fledgling Russian real estate market, so it was something of a surprise when the latest victims of failed development schemes discovered that reputable realty agents were huddling over how to come to their rescue. Five established realty firms that built custom apartment projects have collapsed in as many months in this czarist-era capital, leaving nearly 2,000 would-be buyers somewhere short of a new threshold.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1996 | JAMES FLANIGAN
For all the global anxiety and publicity about Russia's election today, U.S. business and investors are curiously indifferent.
BUSINESS
March 3, 1987 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Mikhail S. Gorbachev had U.S. business very much in mind last weekend when he made a proposal on medium-range missiles that has turned pessimism to optimism at the arms control talks in Geneva. Indeed, it's not going too far to say that one big reason the Soviet leader made that arms proposal is that he needs the backing of the U.S. government, and the know-how of U.S. business, if he is to reform the vast but sclerotic Soviet economy.
NEWS
April 17, 1993 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What began as a dignified speech by the Russian president before a group of the country's most powerful industrialists quickly dissolved into an embarrassing moment for Boris N. Yeltsin on Friday, as his audience openly scoffed at his assessment of the economic situation.
NEWS
August 4, 1997 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At dawn here, there's a blue sky, a hot breeze--and the first shriek of power drills. Russia's capital is in a construction frenzy. Giant pipes, mounds of red earth, scaffolding and rope rear up from sidewalks. Craters inexplicably appear in parks, or instant parks sprout from what were urban wastelands only days or weeks ago.
NEWS
June 21, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A week after the arrest of a powerful media mogul, prosecutors took aim at a second Russian tycoon Tuesday, arousing fears of a possible Kremlin campaign against select business leaders. The Moscow prosecutor's office filed suit to reverse the privatization of the country's largest metal company, Norilsk Nickel, which is controlled by leading oligarch Vladimir O. Potanin. The action followed the arrest June 13 of media tycoon Vladimir A.
WORLD
July 10, 2002 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ford Motor Co. officially launched the first fully foreign-owned automotive plant in Russia on Tuesday, a precedent that experts hope will pave the way for other global businesses to set up manufacturing here. The new $150-million plant outside St.
NEWS
June 21, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A week after the arrest of a powerful media mogul, prosecutors took aim at a second Russian tycoon Tuesday, arousing fears of a possible Kremlin campaign against select business leaders. The Moscow prosecutor's office filed suit to reverse the privatization of the country's largest metal company, Norilsk Nickel, which is controlled by leading oligarch Vladimir O. Potanin. The action followed the arrest June 13 of media tycoon Vladimir A.
BUSINESS
June 6, 1999 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia is everyone's Y2K nightmare--a deteriorating nation with dozens of outdated nuclear power plants and a dangerous arsenal of nuclear weapons. Although Russia woke late to the danger, though, the fact that it has far fewer computerized systems than most Western countries gives this otherwise backward country a significant advantage in preparing for the triple-zero day. "In the 1970s, the United States took a giant leap into computers," said Vyacheslav I.
BUSINESS
April 28, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Swindled home buyers are legion in the fledgling Russian real estate market, so it was something of a surprise when the latest victims of failed development schemes discovered that reputable realty agents were huddling over how to come to their rescue. Five established realty firms that built custom apartment projects have collapsed in as many months in this czarist-era capital, leaving nearly 2,000 would-be buyers somewhere short of a new threshold.
NEWS
August 4, 1997 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At dawn here, there's a blue sky, a hot breeze--and the first shriek of power drills. Russia's capital is in a construction frenzy. Giant pipes, mounds of red earth, scaffolding and rope rear up from sidewalks. Craters inexplicably appear in parks, or instant parks sprout from what were urban wastelands only days or weeks ago.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1996 | JAMES FLANIGAN
For all the global anxiety and publicity about Russia's election today, U.S. business and investors are curiously indifferent.
BUSINESS
November 19, 2007 | Chris Baldwin, Reuters
After building a chain of restaurants selling pizza to the Siberians, Eric Shogren has a few tips for foreigners wanting to break into the booming Russian market. Good contacts and respect for the Russian way of doing things are essential. And don't assume Western business practices and ideas are always relevant, says the U.S. citizen. "I'm out here selling Russians pizza left and right.
NEWS
September 29, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vladimir A. Ovchinnikov--the quintessential representative of Russia's influential industrialist class--is easily the most powerful man in this ancient Russian city. As general director of the Aleksandrov Radio Factory, the city's largest enterprise and Russia's largest producer of televisions, he is responsible for the livelihoods of nearly half the city's 130,000 residents.
NEWS
December 24, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five years ago, Alexei Vlasov was a promising young cardiologist doing research in biotechnology. Today he's a venture capitalist. Two years ago, Andrei Tikhotsky was a plasma physicist studying the behavior of particles in super-heated gases contained by magnetic fields. Now he's a banker. The "brain drain" of bright minds from Russian science has swelled to a torrent.
NEWS
April 17, 1993 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What began as a dignified speech by the Russian president before a group of the country's most powerful industrialists quickly dissolved into an embarrassing moment for Boris N. Yeltsin on Friday, as his audience openly scoffed at his assessment of the economic situation.
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