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NEWS
June 6, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin opened a historic convention meant to hammer out Russia's new constitution on Saturday, only to see the assembly sink immediately into scandal when his political archfoe stormed out, accusing him of trying to impose one-man rule. "We are moving toward a dictatorship," Yeltsin's rival, Parliament Chairman Ruslan I. Khasbulatov, warned in dire tones after leaving the Kremlin's stately Marble Hall with several dozen backers from among 700 delegates.
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OPINION
April 23, 2014 | By Jaak Treiman, Juris Bunkis and Daiva Navarrette
After Russia's recent actions in Ukraine, it's no surprise that other countries bordering Russia are wondering where they stand on Vladimir Putin's shopping list. That they are on the list is a given. Article 61 of Russia's Constitution promises that "the Russian Federation shall guarantee its citizens defense and patronage beyond its boundaries. " In other words, Russia shall protect any Russian citizen who is mistreated while outside Russia. On its face, Article 61 may seem reasonable.
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NEWS
June 3, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just when President Boris N. Yeltsin thought it was safe . . . just when it looked like Russia's spasm-racked political system might finally be on the road to stability . . . along came Alexander Sobyanin. Sobyanin, a bespectacled physicist-turned-political scientist, does not look like the kind of man to shatter parliaments and constitutions with a single blow.
WORLD
May 31, 2010 | By Megan K. Stack, Los Angeles Times
There were rock stars and rappers, and there were nurses to take blood donations. Music boomed off the sides of skyscrapers for blocks around. In between patriotism-tinged performances, earnest announcers climbed onto a stage in a square, under a sign that read "Saving Lives," and told hundreds of cheering youths about all the good things that would be done with the donated blood. Monday was Generation Day in Moscow, an event of vague origin, organized by networks of pro-Kremlin youth groups apparently to drown out another event.
NEWS
April 5, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before he was arrested more than a century and a half ago, an idealistic military officer dreamed of a time when Russians, like the other peoples of Europe, would be free citizens of a society grounded in law. "One should establish rules or laws, the way it was of old," wrote Nikita Muraviev, a captain in the Imperial Guards, expressing the seditious credo that would get him banished to Siberia. What this country desperately needed, Muraviev said, was the end of "autocratic sovereigns."
NEWS
June 11, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin admitted Thursday that winning the endorsement of a handpicked assembly for his proposed constitution is proving harder than was expected, and he offered to give equal attention to a rival draft that would grant the less power to the presidency.
NEWS
April 28, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin began trying to cash in Tuesday on his referendum victory, launching a sales campaign for a new constitution that would shore up his presidency and do away with the hostile Congress of People's Deputies. Yeltsin also showed a new willingness to ignore nationalist lawmakers when he issued a tough statement warning Bosnian Serbs that Russia will not stand by them if they continue to reject international peace plans.
NEWS
November 9, 1993
Russians today get their first full look at the proposed new constitution on which they are supposed to vote in a Dec. 12 referendum. With some alterations, the latest draft is expected to strongly resemble proposals that President Boris N. Yeltsin submitted this summer to a constitutional convention. The convention's work foundered on opposition from Parliament, which Yeltsin dissolved on Sept. 21.
NEWS
May 12, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin urged regional leaders Tuesday to bypass the conservative Parliament and take control of a process to draft a new constitution with enhanced presidential powers. More than two weeks after winning a vote of confidence in a nationwide referendum, Yeltsin also fired two senior officials who had resisted his free-market reforms.
NEWS
May 7, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin, vowing tougher action against the "neo-Bolsheviks" he said are ready to spill more blood to oust him, told Russia on Thursday night that he is unleashing a whirlwind of new policies to safeguard his reforms and sweep away remnants of the Soviet past. Declaring that last month's referendum proved people "truly want to see radical change," Yeltsin outlined in a televised speech wide-ranging actions he plans soon.
NEWS
December 6, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a land where organized crime is posing one of the greatest threats to elected government, a variety of suspected criminals and thugs have discovered the best way to avoid arrest and prosecution: Win a seat in the Russian parliament. Under Russia's 6-year-old constitution, no member of parliament can be prosecuted while in office--even for crimes that have nothing to do with parliamentary affairs. "A deputy in Russia is like a deity--he is absolutely untouchable," said Alexander I.
NEWS
May 17, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although President Boris N. Yeltsin escaped impeachment over the weekend, Russia faces another threat to its political stability, this time brought on by its flawed constitution and the president himself. By firing Prime Minister Yevgeny M. Primakov last week, Yeltsin thrust the nation into a brief but perilous period of constitutional limbo in which no one is designated to succeed the president if he should die or become incapacitated.
NEWS
July 1, 1996 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Communist candidate Gennady A. Zyuganov is the upset victor in this week's presidential runoff, Russia--for the first time in its 1,000-year history--will face the prospect of a peaceful transfer of power from an incumbent leader to the challenger who defeated him. But just days before the election, there remains uncertainty about how such a transition would occur--including how the "nuclear button" that controls Russia's vast nuclear arsenal would be transferred.
NEWS
June 3, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just when President Boris N. Yeltsin thought it was safe . . . just when it looked like Russia's spasm-racked political system might finally be on the road to stability . . . along came Alexander Sobyanin. Sobyanin, a bespectacled physicist-turned-political scientist, does not look like the kind of man to shatter parliaments and constitutions with a single blow.
NEWS
December 13, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Accept a constitution that gives the president nearly unchecked powers, and risk dictatorship at the Kremlin's whim. Or reject it, leave Russia without a political rule book in a time of deep strife, and risk civil war. Faced with these seemingly dreadful choices about President Boris N. Yeltsin's new draft constitution, nearly half of Russia's voters stayed home Sunday.
NEWS
December 13, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A light voter turnout apparently ratified President Boris N. Yeltsin's post-Soviet constitution Sunday but gave surprisingly strong support to the most extreme opponent of his free-market reforms in Russia's parliamentary elections. Exit polls and early unofficial returns showed the movement of ultranationalist firebrand Vladimir V. Zhirinovsky vying closely for first place with Russia's Choice, the only party among 13 in the race that promised to stay the government's reformist course.
NEWS
December 13, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Accept a constitution that gives the president nearly unchecked powers, and risk dictatorship at the Kremlin's whim. Or reject it, leave Russia without a political rule book in a time of deep strife, and risk civil war. Faced with these seemingly dreadful choices about President Boris N. Yeltsin's new draft constitution, nearly half of Russia's voters stayed home Sunday.
NEWS
July 13, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Boris N. Yeltsin's new draft constitution cleared a major hurdle when a special assembly approved it Monday, but the Russian president acknowledged that the charter still has a long, tough way to go before it can come into force. "New Russia needs a new constitution," Yeltsin, in a no-nonsense mood, told about 600 members of the assembly gathered in the Kremlin Palace of Congresses. "We convened to work out a new draft and we worked it out.
NEWS
December 12, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vera Yevseyeva's withered apple of a face wrinkled deeper in indignant confusion. "How can I know beforehand who I'm going to vote for?" she demanded. "I'll only find out when I go and vote!" In her indecision and plans for ballot-box spontaneity, the venerable janitor of the Klimov Motor Factory typifies many of the Russian masses voting today on a new constitution and candidates for a new Parliament.
NEWS
November 9, 1993
Russians today get their first full look at the proposed new constitution on which they are supposed to vote in a Dec. 12 referendum. With some alterations, the latest draft is expected to strongly resemble proposals that President Boris N. Yeltsin submitted this summer to a constitutional convention. The convention's work foundered on opposition from Parliament, which Yeltsin dissolved on Sept. 21.
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