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NEWS
March 29, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The story of an Arizona man's ill-fated Arctic fishing camp is one of dozens, if not hundreds, of Western investments in Russia gone wrong. It is a too-familiar tale of greedy local bureaucrats scuttling a booming business by muscling out the foreigner and grabbing his share. As in the case of Bill Davies' Kola Salmon Marketing sport-fishing venture, the strong-arm tactics also tend to scare away paying clients.
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WORLD
October 14, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A court ruled against Josef Stalin's grandson in a libel suit over a newspaper article that said the Soviet dictator sent thousands of people to their deaths. A judge at a Moscow district court rejected Yevgeny Dzhugashvili's claim that Novaya Gazeta damaged Stalin's honor and dignity in an April article that referred to him as a "bloodthirsty cannibal." A ruling against the newspaper would have been regarded as an exoneration of Stalin and a blow to Russians who accuse the Kremlin of whitewashing history.
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NEWS
February 5, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a setback for environmentalist Alexander Nikitin, Russia's Supreme Court ruled Thursday that federal authorities can pursue spying charges against the former Navy captain even though they failed to convict him at his trial last year. Nikitin, who is accused of espionage for helping to expose radioactive pollution by the Russian navy, had asked the high court to throw out the case after a lower court ruled that the evidence was not strong enough to convict him.
WORLD
June 26, 2009 | Megan K. Stack
Russia's Supreme Court on Thursday overturned the acquittal of three men charged as accessories in the assassination of investigative journalist Anna Politkovskaya. The court ordered a new trial for two Chechen brothers and a former police officer who had been declared innocent by a jury in February of involvement as lookouts and couriers.
NEWS
April 18, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A branch of the Supreme Court upheld a lower court's acquittal of Alexander Nikitin, a former navy captain who was arrested and charged with treason and espionage after he helped expose the unsafe storage of nuclear waste by the Russian navy. Prosecutors can appeal to the high court's presidium, but defense lawyers said the strong wording of the ruling all but eliminated that possibility. Nikitin, a naval engineer, was arrested in 1996 and held for 10 months in a St. Petersburg jail.
NEWS
October 2, 1992 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The irate chairman of the Constitutional Court vowed Thursday to drag former Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev to the witness stand in a controversial case that has put the Communist Party on trial. Denouncing the proceedings as a "political game," Gorbachev refused Tuesday to testify in the long-running case, creating a confrontation that is now being seen as a test of the year-old court's ability to conduct a fair trial.
NEWS
October 4, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Transformed by a court-ordered travel ban into Russia's "first political refusenik," former Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev appealed to the media Saturday to help him force authorities to prove they are acting lawfully. But press releases from the Gorbachev Foundation, a think tank headed by Gorbachev, indicated that he will bow to the will of the Constitutional Court and not try to leave the country. The court had asked Russian authorities to prevent him from going abroad.
NEWS
August 13, 1993 | Reuters
A Russian court fined former Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev 30 rubles (3 U.S. cents) on Thursday for failing to appear to answer slander charges leveled by the mayor of Moscow. The Postfactum news agency said Gorbachev was accused of defaming Mayor Yuri M. Luzhkov after televised remarks accusing the Moscow administration of using public funds to build personal villas on the outskirts of the capital. "Since neither M. Gorbachev nor his representative appeared on Aug.
NEWS
June 8, 1993 | From Reuters
The head of Russia's Constitutional Court offered Boris N. Yeltsin unexpected support Monday, saying he broadly backs the president's tough speech to a constitutional assembly. Court Chairman Valery D. Zorkin, a key arbitrator in Russia's power struggle, is formally independent but has several times sided with conservatives against the reformist president. The Itar-Tass news agency quoted him as saying he "favored strong presidential power in Russia."
NEWS
December 27, 2000 | From Associated Press
A Moscow court ruled Tuesday that fraud charges by the nation's top prosecutor against media tycoon Vladimir A. Gusinsky were unsubstantiated and illegal. The prosecutor general's office, however, said it would appeal the ruling and continue pressing its case against Gusinsky, the Interfax news agency reported. Head of the Media-Most holding company, Gusinsky is under house arrest in Spain, where he was detained earlier this month at the request of Russian authorities.
WORLD
May 20, 2009 | Megan K. Stack
There were 6,295 Polish prisoners held captive at the monastery when the order came to "unload" the camp. It took a month and a half to kill all of them. The prisoners were mostly military officers, police, gendarmes and landlords, rounded up as a dangerous "bourgeois" elite when the Soviet Union invaded eastern Poland in the run-up to World War II. The following year, 1940, the Communist Party decided to eliminate them.
WORLD
December 30, 2005 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
A former Russian atomic energy minister arrested on embezzlement charges in Switzerland will be extradited to his homeland rather than the United States, a court said Thursday, ending a fierce tug of war between Moscow and Washington.
NEWS
June 8, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
An appeals court in the Russian city of Voronezh slashed the sentence of an American Fulbright scholar convicted on drug charges from 37 months to a year, though his family and U.S. lawmakers continued to protest his imprisonment. John Edward Tobin's case has attracted wide attention since Russian security officials publicly accused the 24-year-old of being a spy in training. No espionage charges were filed. Tobin has said he was framed.
NEWS
December 27, 2000 | From Associated Press
A Moscow court ruled Tuesday that fraud charges by the nation's top prosecutor against media tycoon Vladimir A. Gusinsky were unsubstantiated and illegal. The prosecutor general's office, however, said it would appeal the ruling and continue pressing its case against Gusinsky, the Interfax news agency reported. Head of the Media-Most holding company, Gusinsky is under house arrest in Spain, where he was detained earlier this month at the request of Russian authorities.
NEWS
April 18, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A branch of the Supreme Court upheld a lower court's acquittal of Alexander Nikitin, a former navy captain who was arrested and charged with treason and espionage after he helped expose the unsafe storage of nuclear waste by the Russian navy. Prosecutors can appeal to the high court's presidium, but defense lawyers said the strong wording of the ruling all but eliminated that possibility. Nikitin, a naval engineer, was arrested in 1996 and held for 10 months in a St. Petersburg jail.
NEWS
February 5, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a setback for environmentalist Alexander Nikitin, Russia's Supreme Court ruled Thursday that federal authorities can pursue spying charges against the former Navy captain even though they failed to convict him at his trial last year. Nikitin, who is accused of espionage for helping to expose radioactive pollution by the Russian navy, had asked the high court to throw out the case after a lower court ruled that the evidence was not strong enough to convict him.
NEWS
October 3, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the most shocking sign yet of how far his stature has plummeted in his homeland, former Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev was legally barred Friday from leaving Russia until he agrees to testify in the "trial" of the Communist Party.
NEWS
July 24, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Valery Zorkin, the august chairman of Russia's Constitutional Court, was practically tearing his hair. "The court is forced to ask you: Do you have a coordinator for your case or don't you?" he exclaimed, looking over his glasses in exasperation at a Communist Party legal expert. "Your team has contradicted itself three times now! "It's not just the chairman saying this, but the other judges, as well," he added. "And it's not just the court saying this but simple logic!"
NEWS
March 29, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The story of an Arizona man's ill-fated Arctic fishing camp is one of dozens, if not hundreds, of Western investments in Russia gone wrong. It is a too-familiar tale of greedy local bureaucrats scuttling a booming business by muscling out the foreigner and grabbing his share. As in the case of Bill Davies' Kola Salmon Marketing sport-fishing venture, the strong-arm tactics also tend to scare away paying clients.
NEWS
September 16, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year after President Boris N. Yeltsin dissolved Parliament, triggering a bloody revolt that left 143 people dead, the libel suit has replaced the Kalashnikov rifle as the chief instrument of political struggle in Russia. On Thursday, ultranationalist lawmaker Vladimir V. Zhirinovsky won a libel suit against Yegor T. Gaidar, the architect of Yeltsin's free-market economic reforms, who had called Zhirinovsky "the most popular fascist" in Russia.
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