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NEWS
September 25, 1992 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Step carefully around the cow droppings as you head down the rutted dirt path, towel in hand, for your 10-minute curative bath in the "miraculous" mineral waters of the Kuldur Spa. A flimsy-looking statue of V. I. Lenin, painted a tinny shade of silver, points you toward the crumbling pink building that houses several dozen baths. Under the dim yellow light inside, you strip off your clothes in a frosted-glass cubicle and turn the rusty taps. A cockroach scurries along the wall.
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OPINION
July 19, 2002
Russia has just adopted a new legal code that enshrines the principles of habeas corpus and the presumption of innocence. Capital has stopped fleeing the country and investment has begun to trickle in. Ford Motor Co. recently opened what is believed to be Russia's first foreign-owned large industrial facility. Yet as Russia finds its economic footing, a problem of a different sort is growing.
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NEWS
March 3, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first sex shop in Russian history opened to the public on Monday--only, please, its management insisted, don't call it a sex shop. "We call it 'an intimacy salon,' " director Alla Burashnikova said as she sat primly in a corner watching deeply interested Russians examine glow-in-the-dark condoms, an inflatable woman and six sets of shelves holding probably the broadest array of sexual devices ever gathered in one public place on Russian soil. "We propagandize health," Burashnikova said.
NEWS
April 10, 2002 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is a unique sports car, custom designed and built for one Russian multimillionaire, a black sleek dream with classic European lines. Yet the first time its designer took the car out on Moscow roads, it drew honks, waves of delight--and smiles of recognition. The sports car's design intentionally recalls the Volga 21, first introduced 45 years ago and the only Soviet automobile that transcended the bounds of grim functionality to encapsulate a dream.
NEWS
July 19, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Through waxy red lips, Larissa Solovyova expels a heavy cloud of acrid-smelling smoke, which wafts like a small thundercloud by her face. She thrusts her nose into the smoke, sniffing heavily, her face stern with concentration. She says it takes years of practical smoking classes at Russia's main tobacco university to learn to smoke correctly. Even after five years of study there, her palate was green and inexperienced.
NEWS
December 6, 1997 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Glass breaking, overturning furniture, muffled thuds. A woman screaming from a downstairs apartment: "I'm being killed! I'm being killed!" It's midnight, and three floors up, in a cozy kitchen with a kettle on the boil and pipes gurgling behind the curtains, neighbor Tania Kucherenko shrugs off any suggestion that she should call the police. "It's the same every Saturday night. The husband comes home drunk and beats her.
NEWS
February 9, 1998 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Downstairs, scruffy musicians are picking up violins to start their daily rehearsal. Upstairs, the Moscow State Symphony Orchestra's general manager, Alexander Krauter, is picking up the phone to start his daily battle--to extract money from unwilling government officials to keep the orchestra going. "If we don't get financing, the orchestra will have to close in three months," he says sadly.
NEWS
April 12, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Braided whips and ceremonial sabers at their sides, mustachioed men in World War I vintage uniforms and knee-high boots crowded in rowdy fashion around the long table, looking like ancestral portraits that had stepped down from the wall. Assembled in the Ataman Palace for a Saturday morning powwow on tactics, each of the men was himself an ataman, or Cossack chieftain. And they were arguing with the urgent energy of men who see power within their grasp.
NEWS
May 23, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The road to Anna Tsvetkova's house meanders two miles down a deeply rutted dirt track, sometimes vanishing into the vast, marshy, muddy morass that is Russia in springtime. Cars and trucks are no match for the devouring muck; only the clumpy wheel prints of heavy Soviet tractors show where the road once lay. A sturdy villager with good rubber boots can make the two-mile trek in less than an hour. But the nearest doctor is 11 miles away.
NEWS
August 29, 1992 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prof. Yevgeny Sheryaev never wants to see another article about a konsensis reached at a sammit between two sooper-star politicians. As deputy director of the Russian Language Institute, Sheryaev has tracked, with mounting incredulity, the scores of American words that have infiltrated everyday Russian speech since then-Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev introduced perestroika and glasnost to the English lexicon seven years ago.
NEWS
August 26, 2001 | IRINA TITOVA, ASSOCIATED PRESS
"Although vodka is white, it paints your nose red and blackens your reputation," Anton Chekhov, the 19th century author, wrote. The potent liquor has been a fixture of Russian life for more than five centuries, celebrated and cursed in books and films. For governments, it's been both a source of revenue and a social bane. Now vodka is getting its due in a new museum housed in the basement of an old building in the heart of St. Petersburg, Russia's former imperial capital.
NEWS
June 20, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are four ways to get to this tiny settlement high in the mountains of Tajikistan: You can travel by foot, donkey or horse, but the fastest, most reliable way is to go by Goat. The Goat--or Kozyol--is not the four-legged kind, but a four-wheel-drive. It is an affectionate Russian nickname for a gritty, go-anywhere, Soviet-designed jeep as reliable as it is ugly.
NEWS
February 18, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Larisa Dushko caught a glimpse of the soft curve of her firstborn baby's bottom, nothing more. It took her six years to even get her hands on a photograph, and she has never held her daughter's hand or touched her face. At birth, doctors called the baby a "monster" too terrible for her parents to look at, and her own grandfather tried to have her "put to sleep."
NEWS
January 3, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Mikhail Puchkov, the only way to experience freedom in Soviet life was to steal it: paddling down a river in the dead of night in a homemade pedal-powered submarine. Traveling in his illegal craft, with its pedals quieted to avoid detection, was an eccentric escape from the crushing reality of Soviet rule with his dignity and creativity intact. Now, sailing out to sea in this chunky, ungainly vessel is his only escape from the disappointment and poverty of the new Russia.
NEWS
September 17, 2000 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They call it bespredel--literally, "no limits." It means acting outside the rules, violently and with impunity. It translates as "excesses" or "atrocities." It's the term Russian soldiers use to describe their actions in Chechnya. "Without bespredel, we'll get nowhere in Chechnya," a 21-year-old conscript explained. "We have to be cruel to them. Otherwise, we'll achieve nothing."
NEWS
July 19, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Through waxy red lips, Larissa Solovyova expels a heavy cloud of acrid-smelling smoke, which wafts like a small thundercloud by her face. She thrusts her nose into the smoke, sniffing heavily, her face stern with concentration. She says it takes years of practical smoking classes at Russia's main tobacco university to learn to smoke correctly. Even after five years of study there, her palate was green and inexperienced.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not quite time to yell, "Move over, Munich!" But a powerful thirst for beer is building throughout Russia, as many in this country of legendary vodka drinkers are coming to prefer a pleasant buzz to getting blotto. Per-capita beer consumption has almost doubled in the past three years, and although it remains a fraction of that consumed by the average German, Czech or American, the outlook is blindingly bright for the lighter tipple--and brewing companies.
NEWS
January 15, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Fantasy: "Frost and Sun! A wonderful day! And you are still asleep, my sweet friend. It is time, beauty. Wake up!" --A.S. Pushkin, 1829 The Reality: "Nine people froze to death in Moscow and 162 were taken to the hospital with frostbite" in the first week of this year. --Interfax news agency, 1997 The Moral: "He who likes sledding [had] better also like to pull."
NEWS
October 20, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the day baby Gleb came into the world, his way was made a little smoother by a Russian tradition that is centuries old: His family paid a bribe. Health care is supposed to be free in Russia, but when Gleb was born Oct. 4, his father gave the obstetrician $300 to make sure the boy and his mother received the best possible care. For the doctor, it was like getting nearly a year's pay. Earlier this year, Alexei D. Krykov, 72, was laid to rest in keeping with the same custom.
NEWS
January 1, 1999 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You might think Santa Claus has a tough job, what with flying all over the world in a single night and figuring out who's been naughty or nice. But these days, he has it easy compared with his Russian cousin, Ded Moroz. Russia's big winter holiday is New Year's, and today is when Ded Moroz makes his rounds. By tradition, he has a somewhat more arduous job than Santa: He usually delivers gifts in person, and he has no brigade of elves to help, just a young girl called Snow Maiden.
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