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January 25, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN and MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Russian government, fighting to stabilize its collapsing economy and end runaway inflation, won legislative approval Friday for an austere budget that almost eliminates the chronic deficit by slashing defense spending. Allocations for arms purchases alone, for example, will be cut by 87%. Deputy Prime Minister Yegor T.
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WORLD
December 2, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - More than 200 years ago, the renowned Russian historian Nikolai Karamzin summed up the situation in his country in two words: "They steal. " They still do, and the news in Russia lately has been dominated by one high-profile corruption scandal after another. Allegations of wrongdoing have reached high into the defense and agriculture ministries and the Russian space program, among other institutions. Nearly nine in 10 Russians say corruption is the nation's biggest problem.
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NEWS
January 27, 1994 | MATT BIVENS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
First they burned the kitchen shelves, then the kitchen table. They burned the wardrobe, and it kept them warm for 22 days. Finally Alexandra Dyen and her son, Vladimir, had nothing left but the family library. "I burned the German classics, and after that it was Shakespeare," Vladimir remembered. "I also burned Pushkin. I don't remember whose edition it was, I think the Marks edition in blue and gold.
WORLD
November 6, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - Russian President Vladimir Putin fired his defense minister Tuesday amid a criminal investigation of suspected fraud and embezzlement involving military assets. Putin announced his decision to dismiss Anatoly Serdyukov two weeks after the federal Investigative Committee said it was looking into the possible "fraudulent sale of real estate, land plots and stocks" belonging to the military. The investigation apparently already found the equivalent of more than $100 million in losses to the government, the committee said.
NEWS
December 30, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia's defense minister said Wednesday that the armed forces will keep more than 2 million soldiers and officers in uniform indefinitely, abandoning plans to slash the force to 1.5 million. Gen. Pavel S. Grachev made the statement in a year-end assessment of the army's future. He put the current strength at 2.3 million, saying it will be cut to 2.1 million by the end of 1994 and thereafter remain stable.
NEWS
August 27, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In May, a group of officers from Russia's Northern Fleet participated in an exercise that they hoped never would be needed: a submarine rescue operation. An old, decommissioned submarine was sunk on an even keel, and Russia's rescue submersibles went to work. Four attempts to dock with the submarine failed, but the official report on the exercise said that it had been a success. The rescue operation for the sunken nuclear submarine Kursk this month was more demanding.
NEWS
March 4, 1998 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin on Tuesday merged three military security agencies under a new chief known for advocating military reform and, thus, apparently ended a minor Cabinet reshuffle with the suggestion that Russia may now move on its long-delayed aim of streamlining the huge ex-Soviet army. Yeltsin named Andrei A. Kokoshin, former chief of the Defense Council and State Military Inspectorate, as new secretary of the Russian Security Council.
NEWS
June 14, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rebuffed by the president and Parliament in an appeal for a bigger budget, Defense Minister Pavel S. Grachev said Monday that he will cut Russia's armed forces from 2.2 million to 1.9 million personnel by Oct. 1. The planned retrenchment would mean an army with 200,000 fewer members than the force that Grachev defined six months ago as the minimum Russia needed to guarantee its security. Grachev reported the planned cuts in brief remarks to the Russian news agency Interfax.
NEWS
December 26, 1994 | from The Washington Post
A huge Russian transport plane that mysteriously landed at Huntsville International Airport in Alabama last week carried an unusual cargo, government and industry sources said: parts of an advanced Russian air defense system that had been purchased by the Pentagon in a secret deal brokered by a Virginia company. At the nearby Redstone Arsenal and other military facilities, technicians plan to assemble the system and test its ability to spot U.S. planes and missiles.
NEWS
August 21, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Striding toward the Russian Federation government headquarters Tuesday in their orthopedic shoes and heavy sweaters, the two grandmothers declared that they were determined to save Russia from the clutches of "the scum" who have seized power. "If you gave the two of us, 72-year-olds, machine guns, we'd shoot them all," said one of the women, who identified herself only as Anna. "It's terrible, what's happening," said Alexandra, her companion, tears filling her wrinkle-framed eyes.
WORLD
March 24, 2005 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
A senior government official in Kyrgyzstan said Wednesday that authorities were prepared to use force against opposition leaders who have taken control of key southern cities, as riot police in the capital broke up protests demanding the resignation of President Askar A. Akayev.
NEWS
September 7, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States will not insist that Moscow agree to its new missile defense strategy by November, when Russian President Vladimir V. Putin pays a call on the Bush administration, Secretary of State Colin L. Powell said Thursday. "We shouldn't see November as necessarily make or break," he said in an interview. "We have to keep all options open as to how we move forward, and all those options are being kept open."
NEWS
July 26, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After talks with a top Russian official in Moscow, National Security Advisor Condoleezza Rice was upbeat Wednesday about the chances of a U.S. agreement with Russia on the Bush administration's plans for a missile shield. With the U.S. and Russia poised for talks that could shape a new post-Cold War security framework, Rice expressed America's eagerness to press ahead and jettison the 1972 Antiballistic Missile Treaty, which bans deployment of a national missile shield.
NEWS
August 27, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In May, a group of officers from Russia's Northern Fleet participated in an exercise that they hoped never would be needed: a submarine rescue operation. An old, decommissioned submarine was sunk on an even keel, and Russia's rescue submersibles went to work. Four attempts to dock with the submarine failed, but the official report on the exercise said that it had been a success. The rescue operation for the sunken nuclear submarine Kursk this month was more demanding.
NEWS
June 4, 2000 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eschewing first-name familiarity, President Clinton and President Vladimir V. Putin--one nearing his departure from office, the other just arriving--plunged into wide-ranging discussions Saturday night as U.S.-Russian relations appeared to be approaching an anxious moment.
NEWS
December 16, 1999 | ROBYN DIXON and MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A column of Russian armored vehicles probed deep into Grozny, the capital of Chechnya, on Wednesday, clashing with rebel defenders just hours after Moscow again rejected international mediation of its conflict with the breakaway southern republic. The Russian incursion, reported by Western news agencies citing local witnesses, appeared to be the largest and deepest probe so far into the besieged city, which has been under attack for months.
NEWS
August 25, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With eyes swollen from crying and voices quaking with grief and gratitude, the Russian people on Saturday buried their three newest heroes in coffins draped with the white, blue and red flag of free Russia. Clutching candles, bouquets of flowers and enormous photos of the dead men, hundreds of thousands of people--many of whom had stood with the victims in a dramatic people's resistance to last week's reactionary junta--moved solemnly through the streets of Moscow.
NEWS
August 31, 1993 | From Associated Press
The Soviet Union cannot be blamed for shooting down Korean Air Lines Flight 007 10 years ago and killing the 269 people aboard, the first Russian panel to investigate the disaster said Monday. The panel said the jumbo jet's crew was at fault for straying hundreds of miles off course over Soviet military installations on Sept. 1, 1983. The panel's findings largely agreed with those released in June by the International Civil Aviation Organization in Montreal.
NEWS
October 7, 1999 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia is planning a big boost in military spending--up to $1 billion--to pay for its renewed war against separatist Chechnya. The large spending increase, announced Wednesday by Finance Minister Mikhail M. Kasyanov, suggests that the Kremlin is preparing for a protracted military operation in Chechnya and that casualties among both civilians and soldiers are likely to mount.
NEWS
March 4, 1998 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin on Tuesday merged three military security agencies under a new chief known for advocating military reform and, thus, apparently ended a minor Cabinet reshuffle with the suggestion that Russia may now move on its long-delayed aim of streamlining the huge ex-Soviet army. Yeltsin named Andrei A. Kokoshin, former chief of the Defense Council and State Military Inspectorate, as new secretary of the Russian Security Council.
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