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August 25, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With eyes swollen from crying and voices quaking with grief and gratitude, the Russian people on Saturday buried their three newest heroes in coffins draped with the white, blue and red flag of free Russia. Clutching candles, bouquets of flowers and enormous photos of the dead men, hundreds of thousands of people--many of whom had stood with the victims in a dramatic people's resistance to last week's reactionary junta--moved solemnly through the streets of Moscow.
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NEWS
August 31, 1993 | From Associated Press
The Soviet Union cannot be blamed for shooting down Korean Air Lines Flight 007 10 years ago and killing the 269 people aboard, the first Russian panel to investigate the disaster said Monday. The panel said the jumbo jet's crew was at fault for straying hundreds of miles off course over Soviet military installations on Sept. 1, 1983. The panel's findings largely agreed with those released in June by the International Civil Aviation Organization in Montreal.
NEWS
August 29, 1991 | Agence France-Presse
A battalion of Soviet paratroopers equipped with armored cars has been guarding the dacha of Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin since Tuesday night, its commander said Wednesday. Lt. Col. Igor Miroshnichenko said the 10 armored cars will protect the villa for the next two weeks. The Russian Federation president was in his dacha Aug. 19 under the protection of his bodyguards when the three-day coup against Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev was instituted.
NEWS
August 22, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Hurrah! Hurrah! Hurrah!" Crowing their triumph in voices ragged from fatigue, applauding and raising their fists high, the tens of thousands of Muscovites who had shielded the Russian Federation government building with their bodies over two long, tense nights declared their victory Wednesday evening with roars of joy. Konstantin I.
NEWS
February 8, 1997 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia's armed forces are so broke and in such a state of decay that they soon may not be able to guarantee the security of one of the world's largest nuclear arsenals nor even defend their country, top officials acknowledged Friday. "The worst thing of all is that I, the defense minister, am presiding over destructive processes in the army and can do nothing about it," Defense Minister Igor N. Rodionov said at a news conference.
NEWS
August 25, 1991 | ANDREI OSTROUKH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Voices from the funeral procession for the three victims who were killed when they resisted the military last week: and
"We came here to pay a last tribute to the heroes of the nation. I was here at the White House for two nights. Now I know what a 'combat situation' is. And I do not want my child and future children ever to know what it is. I want everybody to live in peace. We must remember these guys to our last days. Yes, I have explained who they are to my daughter already." --Ivan Teplov, 27, elevator mechanic, attending the march with his wife, Olga, 23, a maternity nurse, and daughter Alexandra, 4.
NEWS
August 21, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Russians acting as human shields for Boris N. Yeltsin battled tanks with stones and Molotov cocktails early today as Soviet army units crashed through barricades set up to protect Russia's government. Two people were shot to death by soldiers and two others were crushed under the treads, eyewitnesses said.
NEWS
February 2, 1992 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush, without committing himself to embrace the idea, said Saturday that Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin's proposal for cooperation on a global missile defense system is "worth discussing in much more detail" in coming weeks. Bush, who had previously avoided direct comment on the proposal, even hinted that studying the idea might be a way to employ ex-Soviet nuclear scientists at home so they would not be tempted to sell their know-how to Third World nations seeking atomic bombs.
NEWS
December 20, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Secretary of State James A. Baker III agreed Thursday that Russia should retain part of the massive Soviet nuclear arsenal, even though most of the missiles are aimed at the United States and its allies, because a nuclear-free Russia would upset the concept of deterrence that has kept the peace for the last four decades.
NEWS
June 4, 2000 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eschewing first-name familiarity, President Clinton and President Vladimir V. Putin--one nearing his departure from office, the other just arriving--plunged into wide-ranging discussions Saturday night as U.S.-Russian relations appeared to be approaching an anxious moment.
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