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May 1, 1992 | From Associated Press
Mikhail S. Gorbachev, preparing for a U.S. tour, said Thursday that the United States should stop acting as the world's policeman and focus on building democracies around the globe. Gorbachev, interviewed by the Associated Press at the offices of the think tank he founded, also said that President Boris N. Yeltsin has pushed Russia too quickly toward reform, putting it in danger of a social explosion.
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NEWS
July 3, 1999 | TYLER MARSHALL and RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two Russian military operations that carried the whiff of confrontation with the West signal neither an immediate return to Cold War tensions nor an imminent crisis in ties with the United States, according to officials and political analysts in both Washington and Moscow. Moscow's recent maneuvers have their roots in more benign political ground, Russian domestic politics, these sources believe. Above all, they seem to reflect the need for Russian President Boris N.
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NEWS
June 2, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just five months after losing his job as Soviet prime minister, Nikolai I. Ryzhkov is fighting for a second political life as the first popularly elected president of Russia. On Saturday, with a little color back in his cheeks after a Christmas-Day heart attack and a measure of new-found fervor, Ryzhkov outlined the political program he would implement if given the chance to lead the vast Russian Federation, the country's largest republic.
NEWS
January 19, 1996 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration warned Thursday that it might not support Russian membership in important Western organizations such as the Group of Seven industrialized nations if Moscow turns back from economic reform and hardens its foreign policies.
NEWS
February 25, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Admitting that Russia is mired in chaos and crime, President Boris N. Yeltsin proposed a new regime of law, order and political cooperation on Thursday in his first State of the Nation speech to the new Parliament. He struck such a conciliatory note that he did not even mention the lawmakers' defiant vote on Wednesday to pardon all his political foes who face charges for their roles in the 1991 coup attempt and last October's Moscow clashes.
NEWS
December 30, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With his decision to storm the rebel Chechen capital of Grozny, Boris Nikolayevich Yeltsin's transformation from populist reformer to Kremlin hard-liner is complete, the Russian president's many critics say. "Yeltsin is at the point of no return," political analyst Alexei G. Arbatov said. "He has decided to go all out. He thinks he needs no allies because the army and police are on his side. He spits on the democrats' love."
NEWS
May 30, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Declaring a "constitutional crisis" amid a revived onslaught by opponents who are loudly questioning his policies, his motives and even his drinking habits, President Boris N. Yeltsin now wants a political New Deal in Russia. "The sociopolitical situation in Russia is difficult, and forces opposed to the reforms are beginning to rear their heads," Yeltsin said this week, singling out conservatives and Communists who he said have sneaked back into positions of power.
NEWS
January 19, 1996 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration warned Thursday that it might not support Russian membership in important Western organizations such as the Group of Seven industrialized nations if Moscow turns back from economic reform and hardens its foreign policies.
NEWS
December 19, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Russian government offered new signals Saturday that it may boost social programs, ease budgetary restraints and pump more money into industry and agriculture in response to reformists' poor election performance. Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin said in an interview published Saturday that the government plans to bolster its popularity by beefing up social programs to help people hurt by Russia's radical economic reforms. "The reforms themselves were extremely necessary.
NEWS
January 25, 1995 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The shadowy and powerful hard-liners in President Boris N. Yeltsin's inner circle are trying to consolidate their power by creating an elite National Guard to neutralize any internal threats, Russia's leading newspaper reported Tuesday. The article in the daily Izvestia was seen as the latest in a series of signals that Kremlin hawks and a resurgent KGB are trying--albeit fitfully and with resistance--to reimpose Soviet-style political controls on Russia.
NEWS
January 25, 1995 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The shadowy and powerful hard-liners in President Boris N. Yeltsin's inner circle are trying to consolidate their power by creating an elite National Guard to neutralize any internal threats, Russia's leading newspaper reported Tuesday. The article in the daily Izvestia was seen as the latest in a series of signals that Kremlin hawks and a resurgent KGB are trying--albeit fitfully and with resistance--to reimpose Soviet-style political controls on Russia.
NEWS
December 30, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With his decision to storm the rebel Chechen capital of Grozny, Boris Nikolayevich Yeltsin's transformation from populist reformer to Kremlin hard-liner is complete, the Russian president's many critics say. "Yeltsin is at the point of no return," political analyst Alexei G. Arbatov said. "He has decided to go all out. He thinks he needs no allies because the army and police are on his side. He spits on the democrats' love."
NEWS
December 28, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin ordered Russian forces Tuesday to continue disarming the rebel fighters of Chechnya, and he defended the war against the Muslim republic as necessary to end the violence and instability of an outlaw regime. "The reign of banditry on Chechen soil poses a danger to our entire country," Yeltsin said in a nationally televised address, his first speech explaining why he sent thousands of troops into the tiny republic Dec.
NEWS
March 13, 1994 | SONNI EFRON and MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin is stealing a page from the modern U.S. President's playbook: When facing domestic calamity, try foreign affairs. Russia remains a great power that expects to play a key role in resolving international disputes, Yeltsin announced in his Feb. 24 State of the Nation speech to Parliament. His popularity sinking along with the dismal Russian economy and hard-liners nipping at his heels, the president and his men have set out to prove they mean business.
NEWS
February 25, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Admitting that Russia is mired in chaos and crime, President Boris N. Yeltsin proposed a new regime of law, order and political cooperation on Thursday in his first State of the Nation speech to the new Parliament. He struck such a conciliatory note that he did not even mention the lawmakers' defiant vote on Wednesday to pardon all his political foes who face charges for their roles in the 1991 coup attempt and last October's Moscow clashes.
NEWS
February 15, 1994
President Boris N. Yeltsin is scheduled to give his first Russian version of a State of the Union address on Friday, as required by the country's newly adopted constitution. Looking for widespread acceptance, he has invited lawmakers from both houses of Parliament, members of his Cabinet, leaders of all the republics in the Russian Federation, foreign ambassadors and the press to hear the speech in the Kremlin's Marble Hall.
NEWS
January 30, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Russia stretches across the world map, it looks like a slimmed-down Soviet Union, stripped now of most of its possessions in the Baltics, the Caucasus and Central Asia and split away from its Slavic neighbors, Ukraine and Belarus, yet nonetheless a colossus astride Europe and Asia. Yet, this Russia is showing itself to be a different country with a different government, and to have a different president with a different foreign policy than that of the old Soviet Union.
NEWS
July 3, 1999 | TYLER MARSHALL and RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two Russian military operations that carried the whiff of confrontation with the West signal neither an immediate return to Cold War tensions nor an imminent crisis in ties with the United States, according to officials and political analysts in both Washington and Moscow. Moscow's recent maneuvers have their roots in more benign political ground, Russian domestic politics, these sources believe. Above all, they seem to reflect the need for Russian President Boris N.
NEWS
December 19, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Russian government offered new signals Saturday that it may boost social programs, ease budgetary restraints and pump more money into industry and agriculture in response to reformists' poor election performance. Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin said in an interview published Saturday that the government plans to bolster its popularity by beefing up social programs to help people hurt by Russia's radical economic reforms. "The reforms themselves were extremely necessary.
NEWS
May 30, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Declaring a "constitutional crisis" amid a revived onslaught by opponents who are loudly questioning his policies, his motives and even his drinking habits, President Boris N. Yeltsin now wants a political New Deal in Russia. "The sociopolitical situation in Russia is difficult, and forces opposed to the reforms are beginning to rear their heads," Yeltsin said this week, singling out conservatives and Communists who he said have sneaked back into positions of power.
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