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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1995 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moving to broaden its international ties, the Los Angeles Community College District is working to establish its first student and faculty exchange program with a school district in Russia. If the nation's largest community college district adopts the proposal to establish ties with the 35,000-student Lubertsy school district outside Moscow, Los Angeles officials say local students would be enriched by gaining exposure to the former Soviet Union.
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NEWS
September 2, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a day of proud parents, starched white shirts, scrubbed faces and shiny hair bows Saturday as 40 million Russian children and teachers headed back to school on the traditional Sept. 1 start of the academic year. President Vladimir V. Putin made the annual back-to-school observance--known as Knowledge Day--just a little bit more festive for educators when he promised to double the size of the average teacher's salary, now about $35 a month.
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NEWS
September 2, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dressed as an American cowgirl in fringed jacket and boots and bearing gladioli for her teacher, Ksenya Vasilyeva stood at attention Wednesday in the largest collective ritual to survive the Soviet era--the opening of schools throughout Russia all on the same day. But when the yawn-inspiring welcome speeches ended and 8:30 a.m.
NEWS
December 20, 1998 | Reuters
A bust of dictator Josef Stalin was unveiled Saturday in a Russian school to applause from local Communists and protests from teachers opposed to honoring the memory of a man responsible for the deaths of millions. NTV television, in a report from the southern Urals city of Chelyabinsk, said it was the first time a memorial to Stalin had been restored in Russia since the collapse of the Soviet Union.
NEWS
May 7, 1998 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Oleg Podobryansky was a teenager, his dream was to become a top Soviet scientist, doing research that would expand the frontiers of Soviet knowledge to undreamed-of places. But Podobryansky graduated with a doctorate in biochemistry in 1991, the year his Soviet Union and its dreams fell apart. The once-lofty state science institutes were too broke to hire him. So he left the world of science. To make enough money to survive under capitalism, he started trading consumer goods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1992 | DANIELLE A. FOUQUETTE
As Americans on Tuesday were electing the first Democratic President in 12 years, change of a different sort was occurring at a Christian middle school here. Four education officials from Russia, including the deputy minister of education, visited Friends Christian School at Rose Drive Friends Church. The purpose of the visit was to observe firsthand how Christian schools integrate religion into curriculum.
NEWS
December 20, 1998 | Reuters
A bust of dictator Josef Stalin was unveiled Saturday in a Russian school to applause from local Communists and protests from teachers opposed to honoring the memory of a man responsible for the deaths of millions. NTV television, in a report from the southern Urals city of Chelyabinsk, said it was the first time a memorial to Stalin had been restored in Russia since the collapse of the Soviet Union.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1995 | ANTONIO OLIVO
When Carole Ozanian was studying piano at Cal State Long Beach, she dreamed of traveling the world to learn new music and sample different cultures. But, with no money for the college's foreign exchange program and, having married after college and given birth to three girls, those dreams were filed away. That is, until recently.
NEWS
September 2, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a day of proud parents, starched white shirts, scrubbed faces and shiny hair bows Saturday as 40 million Russian children and teachers headed back to school on the traditional Sept. 1 start of the academic year. President Vladimir V. Putin made the annual back-to-school observance--known as Knowledge Day--just a little bit more festive for educators when he promised to double the size of the average teacher's salary, now about $35 a month.
NEWS
June 9, 1992 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Snitching some cake from a table in the teachers' lounge, 11-year-old Sasha Terentyve wriggles onto the sofa, settling himself between a physicist and an archeologist as he flips through a book on Greece. A short, sandy-haired boy with a mischievous grin, Sasha now considers the intellectuals his close friends. He's also on hugging terms with actors, astronomers and artists--all of whom double as teachers in Moscow's experimental School of Art, Culture and Freedom.
NEWS
May 7, 1998 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Oleg Podobryansky was a teenager, his dream was to become a top Soviet scientist, doing research that would expand the frontiers of Soviet knowledge to undreamed-of places. But Podobryansky graduated with a doctorate in biochemistry in 1991, the year his Soviet Union and its dreams fell apart. The once-lofty state science institutes were too broke to hire him. So he left the world of science. To make enough money to survive under capitalism, he started trading consumer goods.
NEWS
October 21, 1996 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yuliya Parkhomenko scratched her head anxiously when asked what she knew about Vladimir I. Lenin, the founder of the Soviet Union, whose bearded likeness could until recently be seen on any wall or town square and whose name was added, mantra-like, to the names of most Soviet institutions. "Lenin?" the 10-year-old repeated with wonder. "Well . . . he's dead. . . ." She paused, fidgeting with her blond braid. Suddenly a huge grin lighted up her face.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1996 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's hard to value education when a high school dropout pushing canned peas in a kiosk earns more than a physics professor. It's hard to talk up honesty when flashy mafiosi zip around in BMWs while shamefaced retirees beg in the subway. It's even hard to respect the law when police demand bribes and court rulings draw scorn. In these tumultuous times, Russian parents are finding it tough to offer their children much moral guidance.
NEWS
January 29, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the Delta Air Lines flight from New York taxied toward the gate at Sheremetyevo Airport, Maria Mikhailova checked her lipstick, fluffed her hennaed hair and heaved a dejected sigh, snapping shut her mirrored compact. "I hate my country," the 21-year-old economics student said as she gazed with disgust toward the dimly lighted terminal. "I'm excited about seeing my family again, but I just cannot live here anymore."
NEWS
August 27, 1995 | ANGELA CHARLTON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When Domingo Co arrived in 1987, he entered a fully subsidized student world teeming with thousands of other Africans and fantasized about his fabulous academic future. Eight years later, he's broke, he's the only African student left in his department and he dreams about nothing but his plane ticket back to Guinea this summer. The collapse of communism and the economic turbulence that followed hit many Russians hard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1995 | ANTONIO OLIVO
When Carole Ozanian was studying piano at Cal State Long Beach, she dreamed of traveling the world to learn new music and sample different cultures. But, with no money for the college's foreign exchange program and, having married after college and given birth to three girls, those dreams were filed away. That is, until recently.
NEWS
October 21, 1996 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yuliya Parkhomenko scratched her head anxiously when asked what she knew about Vladimir I. Lenin, the founder of the Soviet Union, whose bearded likeness could until recently be seen on any wall or town square and whose name was added, mantra-like, to the names of most Soviet institutions. "Lenin?" the 10-year-old repeated with wonder. "Well . . . he's dead. . . ." She paused, fidgeting with her blond braid. Suddenly a huge grin lighted up her face.
NEWS
January 29, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the Delta Air Lines flight from New York taxied toward the gate at Sheremetyevo Airport, Maria Mikhailova checked her lipstick, fluffed her hennaed hair and heaved a dejected sigh, snapping shut her mirrored compact. "I hate my country," the 21-year-old economics student said as she gazed with disgust toward the dimly lighted terminal. "I'm excited about seeing my family again, but I just cannot live here anymore."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1995 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moving to broaden its international ties, the Los Angeles Community College District is working to establish its first student and faculty exchange program with a school district in Russia. If the nation's largest community college district adopts the proposal to establish ties with the 35,000-student Lubertsy school district outside Moscow, Los Angeles officials say local students would be enriched by gaining exposure to the former Soviet Union.
NEWS
September 25, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the class of 1995, the world will never look quite the same. This month, thousands of Russian high school juniors and seniors are being handed a book that could have gotten them arrested a decade ago. It is the first post-Soviet textbook of 20th-Century world history. Unlike its predecessors, this text is written in plain Russian, shunning Soviet-speak. It is determinedly devoid of ideology.
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