Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRussia Elections
IN THE NEWS

Russia Elections

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 13, 2000 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chairman of Russia's election panel denied Tuesday that results from last spring's presidential balloting were falsified, dismissing claims of large-scale vote fraud reported by a Moscow newspaper. "We don't have a single serious document that casts doubt on the outcome of the Russian presidential elections," said Alexander Veshnyakov, chairman of the Central Election Commission. "I'm completely confident that there are no serious facts" behind the report. President Vladimir V.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
March 4, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
As tens of thousands of supporters chanted his name at a wintry outdoor rally, Prime Minister Vladimir Putin declared victory in the Russian presidential election. But opponents of Putin promised to respond with their own mass rallies beginning Monday to highlight vote fraud allegations and ongoing government corruption. Election officials said Sunday that the prime minister held nearly 65% of the vote with almost two-thirds counted. Putin, who was president before becoming premier in 2008, led four rivals including Communist leader Gennady Zyuganov, who had 17%, according to the preliminary tabulations of Russia's Central Election Commission.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 1, 1996 | Associated Press
Foreign investment in Russia fell by almost one-third in the first three months of this year, reflecting uncertainty surrounding the presidential election, the Interfax news agency reported Sunday. Foreign investment in the first quarter of 1996 totaled $928.6 million, compared with $1.79 billion in the fourth quarter of 1995, according to Economics Ministry figures. The ministry said foreign investment rose 3.8% compared with the first quarter of 1995.
WORLD
December 27, 2011 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
After more than three weeks of public protests over fraud allegations in Russia's parliamentary elections, Prime Minister Vladimir Putin has made it clear that he will not accede to one of the principal demands of demonstrators. There will be no revote, he said Tuesday in televised remarks. "The elections are over … and the Duma [the parliament's lower house] is functioning," Putin declared. "All talks about any revision [of the election results] are impossible. " Putin, who is seeking a return to the presidency in March elections, also lashed out at leaders of the ongoing protests, saying they "display their weakness by resorting to insults.
NEWS
December 10, 1993 | Times Staff Writer
President Boris N. Yeltsin, in a televised appeal three days before Russia's elections, warned voters that the threat of civil war "will loom over the country" unless they adopt a new constitution that strengthens his powers at Parliament's expense.
NEWS
December 15, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The most feared man in Russia was on a tear. Russia has no history of anti-Semitism, and any hatred of Jewish people must be provoked by Jews themselves, radical nationalist Vladimir V. Zhirinovsky declared Tuesday in his first news conference since his party placed first in Russia's parliamentary elections with 24% of the vote.
NEWS
December 19, 1995 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration reacted calmly Monday to the Communist Party's apparent success in the Russian elections, saying there is no reason to believe the results will cause any fundamental change in Russian foreign or economic policy. "We believe that reform in Russia will continue," declared State Department spokesman Nicholas Burns.
NEWS
December 16, 1993 | LARRY B. STAMMER and MATHIS CHAZANOV, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Jewish leaders across the United States reacted with alarm Wednesday at the electoral success in Russia of radical nationalist Vladimir V. Zhirinovsky, and some predicted an upsurge in the number of Jews attempting to leave the former Soviet Union. Zhirinovsky, whose misnamed Liberal Democratic Party appears to have won 24% of the vote in Russia's parliamentary elections, has long blamed Jews for many of the ills that have befallen Russia, as well as for starting both world wars, U.S.
NEWS
June 16, 1996 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lyudmila Sebeleva and Tanya Kryuchenkova were drawn to the campus rally of Communist presidential candidate Gennady A. Zyuganov out of curiosity, but, like most of the scores of students joining them, the two friends had already decided to vote for Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin. "We're choosing the way we are going to live in the future," said Sebeleva, 20, who like her friend is studying to be a structural engineer at Construction Academy in this Siberian city of 1.3 million.
NEWS
December 18, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Svetlana Pushkina, a 21-year-old medical student in Moscow, had an argument with her parents--"a big scandal," she called it--on the eve of Russia's parliamentary elections. Pushkina told them she was determined to vote for the party led by Yegor T. Gaidar, a former economics minister and pioneer of Russia's post-Soviet market reforms. "He is a symbol of changes for me. "My parents wanted me to vote for the Communists," she said. "They grew up back in the '60s, and they don't like changes.
WORLD
December 4, 2011 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
Russia's ruling party appeared to have lost significant support among voters and was barely winning a majority in the lower house of parliament, according to exit polls and preliminary ballot counts in elections held Sunday. With 85% of the ballots counted, the United Russia party of Prime Minister Vladimir Putin and President Dmitry Medvedev was leading its rivals with about 50% of the vote, far below the 64% it won in 2007. The Communist Party trailed with almost 20% of the vote, followed by Just Russia, with about 13%, and the Liberal Democratic Party of Russia, with about 12%. If the totals hold up, the results will be a stinging defeat for Putin, who has announced plans to run for president early next year.
WORLD
March 3, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Prime Minister Vladimir Putin's party racked up commanding leads in local elections that nongovernmental parties and independent observers said were awash in widespread voting violations. The United Russia party held huge advantages in all nine regional parliamentary elections as well as in thousands of municipal votes, according to preliminary results from the Central Elections Commission. Russia's only independent election monitoring organization, Golos, or Voice, alleged "mass violations" in several regions.
WORLD
November 10, 2007 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
Russia has sharply reduced the number of European monitors permitted to observe upcoming parliamentary elections and has imposed restrictions that may impede the ability of opposition parties to run successful campaigns, one of Europe's main monitoring delegations said Friday. An assessment in advance of the Dec. 2 vote by a delegation of the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe raises questions about whether political opponents can counter President Vladimir V.
WORLD
December 10, 2003 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
A suicide bomber set off a large explosion Tuesday just outside Red Square, killing six people and wounding 14 in a brazen attack that struck the very heart of Moscow, raising questions about stability just two days after parliamentary elections cemented President Vladimir V. Putin's control of the government.
NEWS
September 13, 2000 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chairman of Russia's election panel denied Tuesday that results from last spring's presidential balloting were falsified, dismissing claims of large-scale vote fraud reported by a Moscow newspaper. "We don't have a single serious document that casts doubt on the outcome of the Russian presidential elections," said Alexander Veshnyakov, chairman of the Central Election Commission. "I'm completely confident that there are no serious facts" behind the report. President Vladimir V.
NEWS
May 8, 2000 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vladimir V. Putin, a former KGB officer and Soviet spy, was sworn in to office Sunday as Russia's second president in a gilded Kremlin hall that was once the throne room of the czars. With his right hand resting on Russia's constitution and former President Boris N. Yeltsin standing nearby, Putin took the oath of office in a solemn ceremony designed to emphasize the peaceful transfer of power from Yeltsin to his chosen successor.
NEWS
December 21, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The armed forces did not receive a single vote in Russia's parliamentary elections; they did not even have a place on the ballot. But they emerged Monday from the nationwide vote as one of the biggest winners, receiving a clear mandate from the public to pursue their brutal war in Chechnya. As artillery and warplanes rained shells and bombs on Grozny, the Chechen capital, major political parties supporting the military received three-quarters of the vote.
NEWS
December 15, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Communists and ultranationalists, claiming victories in Russia's parliamentary elections, called Tuesday for abrupt changes in the Cabinet and free-market reform program of President Boris N. Yeltsin. But they stopped short of forming a legislative alliance. With 80 of 89 regions reporting, Vladimir V. Zhirinovsky's extremist Liberal Democratic Party commanded 24% of Sunday's vote, a margin of nearly 2 to 1 over the runner-up Russia's Choice bloc led by eight Yeltsin Cabinet ministers.
NEWS
March 28, 2000 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It looks like a big victory. But for Russia's new president, Vladimir V. Putin, it may not be big enough. Putin defeated his nearest rival, Communist Party candidate Gennady A. Zyuganov, by an ample margin of more than 23 percentage points in Sunday's presidential election. Most candidates would consider that an impressive win. But in Russia, it's nearly a loss. For Putin, "this cannot be seen as any kind of triumphant 'mandate,' " said Andrei Cherkizov, a commentator for Echo of Moscow radio.
NEWS
March 28, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Between taking congratulatory phone calls from world leaders and accepting a fat bouquet of red roses from his ministers, Russia's President-elect Vladimir V. Putin went back to business as usual Monday, ordering the government to finalize a strategy for the country's future and make sure all back wages are paid.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|