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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1996 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The black wind that blew through Europe in the first part of the 20th century came early to Belogorodka. Ikhel Vodonos was born to it. His life began in 1916, a year before the Russian Revolution, in the midst of world war and restless times. He was, like many of the town's inhabitants, a Jew, the youngest of 13 children born to Yankel and Reizl Vodonos. At first, the revolution didn't mean much more than some new slogans in Belogorodka. Even the pogroms didn't change. "Bandits are coming!"
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1999 | Reuters
Immigration by Jews from Russia to Israel rose significantly in the first half of 1999, Israel's Central Bureau of Statistics said Thursday. The bureau said 12,190 Jews from Russia came to Israel in the first six months of the year, an increase of 130% compared with the same period last year. Earlier this year, the quasi-governmental Jewish Agency attributed a rise in newcomers from Russia to the economic crisis there and a rise in anti-Semitism.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1998 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the stretch of Santa Monica Boulevard where the store signs turn to Cyrillic script and the market cases bulge with sausage, Russia's economic and political crisis evokes dismay, fatalism, even indifference. But one thing emigrants from the former Soviet Union don't express when they scan the headlines is surprise. No, they shrug, this is all too predictable, a mess that will not go away, even if President Boris N. Yeltsin does.
NEWS
January 16, 1999 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite occasional outbreaks of right-wing extremism and much public anguish about how to preserve the memory of the Holocaust, Germany now has the fastest-growing Jewish population outside Israel. However, the growing tide of Jewish immigration here is less a tribute to German social harmony than a troubling sign that anti-Semitism is on the rise elsewhere.
NEWS
December 22, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Isaac Mankin, 53, a senior scientist in the southern Russian city of Saratov, applied to emigrate from the Soviet Union 2 1/2 years ago, he expected that it would be quick and simple because, after decades of trouble, Jews were finally leaving by the thousands for Israel. "The refusenik era was over--even the biggest scientists could go," said Dr. Anna Mankin, a daughter. "We thought there was no possibility of our being turned down.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1996 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pearlie Brayman was 4 years old when Joseph, preceded by the clop-clop-clop of her grandfather's horse and buggy, came for the first time to her family's house in Lowell, Mass. He was wearing clothes from the old country, but he was cleanshaven, not like her grandfather with his goatee or men from the synagogue with their long beards. The whole family came out to see him. Minnie, the oldest girl, was 18, with dark hair and dark eyes. It was New Year's Day, 1914.
NEWS
January 16, 1999 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite occasional outbreaks of right-wing extremism and much public anguish about how to preserve the memory of the Holocaust, Germany now has the fastest-growing Jewish population outside Israel. However, the growing tide of Jewish immigration here is less a tribute to German social harmony than a troubling sign that anti-Semitism is on the rise elsewhere.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1996 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ikhel was studying for his last college examination when German soldiers attacked all along the Soviet frontier, from the Baltic to the Black Sea. Four days later, on June 26, 1941, he finished school, and a week after that, Ikhel was in the army. His brothers Shimshon and Isaak were also drafted. Shimshon's unit was attacked on its way to the border to fight. He was the first of 20 family members to die as the Nazis marched farther and farther into Soviet lands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1996 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You don't stop living, Ikhel would say years later, because of war and bloodshed and tragedy. During the Second World War, when they were soldiers who fell in love at first sight, he and Riva never thought about what was going to happen tomorrow. They just lived. And after the fighting was over, when they learned whom the Nazis had murdered, what could they do but keep on living?
NEWS
January 29, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the Delta Air Lines flight from New York taxied toward the gate at Sheremetyevo Airport, Maria Mikhailova checked her lipstick, fluffed her hennaed hair and heaved a dejected sigh, snapping shut her mirrored compact. "I hate my country," the 21-year-old economics student said as she gazed with disgust toward the dimly lighted terminal. "I'm excited about seeing my family again, but I just cannot live here anymore."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1998 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the stretch of Santa Monica Boulevard where the store signs turn to Cyrillic script and the market cases bulge with sausage, Russia's economic and political crisis evokes dismay, fatalism, even indifference. But one thing emigrants from the former Soviet Union don't express when they scan the headlines is surprise. No, they shrug, this is all too predictable, a mess that will not go away, even if President Boris N. Yeltsin does.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1996 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This was the only thing that Ikhel had wanted: to see his family. He did not expect America to be a land of plenty. He did not expect American doctors to repair the surgery left half-finished by physicians who operated on him in post-Soviet Russia. He did not even really expect to see his son Yakov again. Or Joseph, his lost brother.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1996 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"My dear brother Joseph," the letter began, "this letter is written by your youngest brother, Ikhel, from Moscow, Russia. . . . I have looked for you for a long time." Seventy-eight years had passed since Joseph Vodonos left his family behind in Belogorodka, a predominantly Jewish town in the Ukraine region of pre-revolutionary Russia, coming to America with the new last name of Saltsman and all the promise of the land of liberty still ahead of him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1996 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You don't stop living, Ikhel would say years later, because of war and bloodshed and tragedy. During the Second World War, when they were soldiers who fell in love at first sight, he and Riva never thought about what was going to happen tomorrow. They just lived. And after the fighting was over, when they learned whom the Nazis had murdered, what could they do but keep on living?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1996 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ikhel was studying for his last college examination when German soldiers attacked all along the Soviet frontier, from the Baltic to the Black Sea. Four days later, on June 26, 1941, he finished school, and a week after that, Ikhel was in the army. His brothers Shimshon and Isaak were also drafted. Shimshon's unit was attacked on its way to the border to fight. He was the first of 20 family members to die as the Nazis marched farther and farther into Soviet lands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1996 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The black wind that blew through Europe in the first part of the 20th century came early to Belogorodka. Ikhel Vodonos was born to it. His life began in 1916, a year before the Russian Revolution, in the midst of world war and restless times. He was, like many of the town's inhabitants, a Jew, the youngest of 13 children born to Yankel and Reizl Vodonos. At first, the revolution didn't mean much more than some new slogans in Belogorodka. Even the pogroms didn't change. "Bandits are coming!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1996 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"My dear brother Joseph," the letter began, "this letter is written by your youngest brother, Ikhel, from Moscow, Russia. . . . I have looked for you for a long time." Seventy-eight years had passed since Joseph Vodonos left his family behind in Belogorodka, a predominantly Jewish town in the Ukraine region of pre-revolutionary Russia, coming to America with the new last name of Saltsman and all the promise of the land of liberty still ahead of him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1996 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pearlie Brayman was 4 years old when Joseph, preceded by the clop-clop-clop of her grandfather's horse and buggy, came for the first time to her family's house in Lowell, Mass. He was wearing clothes from the old country, but he was cleanshaven, not like her grandfather with his goatee or men from the synagogue with their long beards. The whole family came out to see him. Minnie, the oldest girl, was 18, with dark hair and dark eyes. It was New Year's Day, 1914.
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