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NEWS
November 19, 1996 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Cold War is over, the Soviet Union and its feared KGB have disappeared and American and Russian troops are serving side by side in Bosnia. But in the shadowy world of espionage, nothing much has changed. As the charges filed Monday against CIA officer Harold J. Nicholson indicate, the secret service of Russia's new democratic government is targeting the United States in much the same way the old KGB used to do--and with some success.
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NEWS
March 23, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite pledges of good intent by both sides, relations between the United States and Russia appeared Thursday to have hit the lowest point since the Cold War's end, symbolized in part by the Bush administration's mass expulsions of Russian diplomats and Moscow's plans to "adequately respond." The State Department formally notified the Russian Embassy in Washington that four of their diplomats have to leave within 10 days and two more who recently left will not be allowed back.
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NEWS
February 24, 1994 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration sought Wednesday to keep U.S.-Russian relations from suffering a major setback, even as intelligence sources blamed the deaths of at least two agents and possibly many more on the CIA official accused of spying for the Kremlin.
NEWS
November 19, 1996 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Cold War is over, the Soviet Union and its feared KGB have disappeared and American and Russian troops are serving side by side in Bosnia. But in the shadowy world of espionage, nothing much has changed. As the charges filed Monday against CIA officer Harold J. Nicholson indicate, the secret service of Russia's new democratic government is targeting the United States in much the same way the old KGB used to do--and with some success.
NEWS
March 23, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite pledges of good intent by both sides, relations between the United States and Russia appeared Thursday to have hit the lowest point since the Cold War's end, symbolized in part by the Bush administration's mass expulsions of Russian diplomats and Moscow's plans to "adequately respond." The State Department formally notified the Russian Embassy in Washington that four of their diplomats have to leave within 10 days and two more who recently left will not be allowed back.
NEWS
November 19, 1996 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what federal authorities Monday called the most damaging espionage failure since the Aldrich H. Ames scandal, a former CIA station chief has been arrested and charged with betraying American spies and passing a wide range of top-secret information to Moscow. Harold J. Nicholson, 46, was arrested Saturday at Dulles International Airport in Virginia as he was about to board a flight for Zurich, where authorities allege he was to meet his Russian spy handlers.
NEWS
March 3, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's one espionage suspect on trial, a U.S. Fulbright scholar was branded a spy in training and held on drug charges, and the United States is accusing Russia of buying surveillance secrets from a high-level FBI agent. Into this ferment, Russia's former spymaster emerged Friday from semi-retirement to say that all the "spy mania" is overblown.
NEWS
January 9, 1998 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Helen Park celebrated her 24th birthday on Thursday with nine job interviews. Giggling and nervous, the UC Riverside MBA candidate confessed she was "pretty excited," but pronounced herself confident and prepared. "I'm going to walk away with a job," she exclaimed. Park was among 600 MBA students from a dozen business schools who attended the West Coast MBA Consortium, a three-day job fair at the Hyatt Regency Irvine that ends today.
NEWS
February 26, 1994 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration on Friday expelled Russia's reputed espionage station chief, who officials said has worked here under diplomatic cover as a counselor in the Russian Embassy. President Clinton ordered the expulsion of Aleksandr Iosifovich Lysenko--described by U.S. officials as the "resident," or chief intelligence officer--at the Russian Embassy after Russia failed to withdraw him voluntarily.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1990
How can you tell fall has arrived in eternally sunny Southern California? Well, one way is by the start of the autumn arts and entertainment season. This special fall preview section provides listings of events from today through the end of the year and our critics' picks for the best bets in film, pop music, jazz, stage, music and dance and the visual arts. (Some box-office telephone numbers may not be in operation yet.) Pacific Heights (Friday).
NEWS
November 19, 1996 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what federal authorities Monday called the most damaging espionage failure since the Aldrich H. Ames scandal, a former CIA station chief has been arrested and charged with betraying American spies and passing a wide range of top-secret information to Moscow. Harold J. Nicholson, 46, was arrested Saturday at Dulles International Airport in Virginia as he was about to board a flight for Zurich, where authorities allege he was to meet his Russian spy handlers.
NEWS
February 24, 1994 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration sought Wednesday to keep U.S.-Russian relations from suffering a major setback, even as intelligence sources blamed the deaths of at least two agents and possibly many more on the CIA official accused of spying for the Kremlin.
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