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October 22, 1995 | MICHAEL TARM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the dark days of Stalinist rule, young Lennart Meri went to bed every night with headphones from his makeshift shortwave radio clamped to his head and Western broadcasts buzzing in his ears. "That radio was very important for me," said Meri, now president of this pro-reform ex-Soviet republic. "It meant I was never stranded. I always knew what was going on in the world."
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NEWS
October 13, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
The International Monetary Fund said Thursday it had no evidence to support an allegation by Republican presidential nominee George W. Bush that former Russian Prime Minister Victor Chernomyrdin diverted IMF loans to his own use. In an exchange about the IMF and the World Bank during the second presidential debate Wednesday night, Bush said there had been a "lot of egregious examples recently" of foreign aid being misused. "We went into Russia, we said here's some IMF money.
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NEWS
March 21, 1999 | From the Washington Post
Russia and the United States expect to finalize two nuclear security agreements this week that will pump hundreds of millions of dollars into the Russian treasury and ease tensions over Russia's nuclear cooperation with Iran, according to officials of both countries. The deals are scheduled to be completed during a crucial visit to Washington by Prime Minister Yevgeny M.
NEWS
September 17, 1999 | TYLER MARSHALL and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright threatened Thursday to withdraw crucial U.S. backing for new International Monetary Fund and World Bank loans to Russia unless Moscow takes "fully adequate" steps to protect aid money from corrupt and criminal elements. "We have made clear that we will not support further multilateral assistance to Russia unless fully adequate safeguards are in place," she told a gathering of foreign policy specialists and diplomats here.
NEWS
August 27, 1998 | JAMES FLANIGAN, TIMES SENIOR ECONOMICS EDITOR
A chorus of international financial experts urged a lowering of U.S. and European interest rates Wednesday to help Russia navigate its rapidly worsening crisis and advocated an assortment of remedies, such as letting Russians spend the American dollars they have stashed in their mattresses. But as the ruble went into free fall and the Russian economy neared collapse, it was clear that any fix for Russia has to go far beyond propping up the currency.
NEWS
June 27, 1998 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The International Monetary Fund said Friday that it had begun preliminary talks with Russia on a new multibillion-dollar loan package, though officials do not expect to complete the negotiations for weeks. Michael Mussa, the organization's research director, said a "further support package" was being "actively discussed." He declined to provide specifics on how big the rescue effort might be or what additional reform measures the IMF was likely to demand. Anatoly B.
NEWS
November 12, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Yevgeny M. Primakov, seeking aid from the International Monetary Fund, said Wednesday that he will not bring back so-called reformers from Russia's previous government to handle negotiations because they have lost credibility in the West. Speaking to members of parliament, an irritated Primakov aimed his comments at Anatoly B.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
The gap between revenue and spending in Russia's 1999 budget will be too monstrous to even be called a "deficit," and the government has no idea where to find money to plug the hole, a senior finance ministry official said Friday. Russia, facing its worst economic crisis since the Soviet collapse, is seeking relief from creditors as it faces the inability to repay all its foreign debts next year, another official said.
NEWS
July 11, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia's escalating financial crisis is fomenting social unrest, and its debts have amassed to a shocking 44% of the country's net worth, Prime Minister Sergei V. Kiriyenko warned Friday. His disclosures, in a speech to the upper house of parliament, succeeded in winning support from the Federation Council for the government's stabilization program. They also are likely to intensify pressure on international lending institutions to bail out Russia.
BUSINESS
April 12, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
$6.8-Billion Loan for Russia OKd: The International Monetary Fund approved the loan to help Russia reform and revive its battered economy. "In view of the generally disappointing performance in 1994, which followed the limited progress in 1993 and 1992, the Russian authorities are aiming at decisive progress in stabilization and structural reform in 1995 to set the stage for sustained recovery," the agency said. The 12-month standby loan is the IMF's second-largest ever.
BUSINESS
April 30, 1999 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After more than seven years and $19 billion, the International Monetary Fund appears to have finally learned some lessons about Russia. The terms of a new Russian loan deal announced this week appear to be stricter than anything that has come previously and--perhaps most important--do not include cash payments. Instead, the deal is in effect a debt rescheduling, and Russia will have to pay back the new $3.1-billion loan plus at least an additional $700 million in the next 12 months.
NEWS
March 21, 1999 | From the Washington Post
Russia and the United States expect to finalize two nuclear security agreements this week that will pump hundreds of millions of dollars into the Russian treasury and ease tensions over Russia's nuclear cooperation with Iran, according to officials of both countries. The deals are scheduled to be completed during a crucial visit to Washington by Prime Minister Yevgeny M.
NEWS
February 6, 1999 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia's lower house of parliament passed a federal budget Friday that calls for minuscule spending, by U.S. standards, but nonetheless left international lenders cold. The budget provides stark testimony on how far the former superpower has fallen in its difficult transition to a market economy. This year's $1.7-trillion U.S. budget dwarfs Russia's planned spending--$25 billion. That means massive Russia intends to spend in a year what the United States will spend in about five days.
NEWS
November 29, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Russian Prime Minister Yevgeny M. Primakov, in unusually frank remarks, said Saturday that he is irritated at being lectured on how to run his economy by unworldly "kids" from the International Monetary Fund. But he conceded that Russia is ready to comply with tough loan conditions and warned the IMF, whose managing director is due in Moscow this week, that he would have no option but to print more rubles if it refuses to hand over credits it has held back.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
The gap between revenue and spending in Russia's 1999 budget will be too monstrous to even be called a "deficit," and the government has no idea where to find money to plug the hole, a senior finance ministry official said Friday. Russia, facing its worst economic crisis since the Soviet collapse, is seeking relief from creditors as it faces the inability to repay all its foreign debts next year, another official said.
NEWS
November 12, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Yevgeny M. Primakov, seeking aid from the International Monetary Fund, said Wednesday that he will not bring back so-called reformers from Russia's previous government to handle negotiations because they have lost credibility in the West. Speaking to members of parliament, an irritated Primakov aimed his comments at Anatoly B.
BUSINESS
March 30, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Russia to Get $6.6 Billion From IMF: Managing Director Michel Camdessus said the International Monetary Fund will likely lend Russia that amount in the next 12 months. Camdessus told the U.S.-Russia Business Council he will recommend the loans to the IMF's executive board to help stabilize and stimulate the Russian economy and that the board will probably approve them.
NEWS
February 7, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His predecessor tried mightily to charm the West, but Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin seems to want to scare it. In dire tones and with ever-increasing urgency, he is telling the world: Help me now, or tyranny will again return to Russia. In the ornate Salle des Fetes at the Paris City Hall, before a well-heeled crowd of dignitaries and Paris glitterati, the towering, 61-year-old Siberian was blunter than ever on Thursday.
NEWS
October 20, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In July the wheat crop failed, roasted alive in the dust as the sun baked the hard earth of Russia's southern steppe to 160 degrees. Soviet-era collective farms around here lie in ruins, the livestock killed and butchered, barns and dwellings pillaged by scavengers. The local administration of this isolated, semidesert area has run out of cash, and in the largest town, half of the adult population is jobless.
NEWS
October 1, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK and MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The international financial community should treat Russia with tough love and cut off the narcotic of foreign loans until it carries out specific measures to build a market economy and balance its budget, ousted chief tax collector Boris Fedorov said Wednesday. "My advice in helping Russia is, don't give it drugs," said Fedorov, who also was fired from his post as a deputy prime minister last month. "Demand from Russia drastic economic reforms."
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