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NEWS
June 25, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS and MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The International Monetary Fund, putting aid for Russia on an unusual fast track, plans to release a "down payment" loan of $1 billion to the government of President Boris N. Yeltsin as soon as the fund approves his economic reform program, U.S. and Russian officials said Wednesday.
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NEWS
July 10, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pushing the world's richest nations hard for increased foreign trade, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin on Friday got billions in additional aid instead. He expressed gratitude, but also regret. "The biggest disappointment I have from the meeting is that to my energetic calls came the reply: 'Yes, yes. It's hard. We'll have to solve those problems,' " Yeltsin said dryly after he met with President Clinton and the rest of the Group of Seven leaders.
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NEWS
April 3, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The director of the European Community's $2.5-billion package of aid projects in Russia said Thursday that the United States and other industrialized nations pledging $24 billion to help Russia can, by careful planning and supervision, prevent the squandering of the funds. Michael Emerson, the EC's ambassador here, said there has been only negligible misuse of funds provided under the humanitarian and technical assistance projects that he oversees.
NEWS
July 9, 1993 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF; Times staff writer John-Thor Dahlburg contributed to this report
The seven-nation economic summit, encouraged by Russia's progress, unveiled a beefed-up $3-billion aid package today to support the former Communist country in its rapidly expanding efforts to repair its economy and shore up democratic political reform. American officials hailed the Group of Seven aid package, which they said was increased by $1 billion at President Clinton's insistence. They said it shows confidence that Russian President Boris N.
NEWS
May 31, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although he already has promises of $24 billion in aid from the West this year, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin is compiling a list of what further assistance he wants when he meets leaders of the major industrial nations this summer. At the top is a five-year moratorium on Russia's repayment of the estimated $80 billion of debts the country inherited from the Soviet Union. Yeltsin also wants an end to the West's strategic restrictions on the transfer of high technology to Russia.
NEWS
April 30, 1993 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four days after Russian voters gave President Boris N. Yeltsin a strong vote of confidence, the United States' major financial allies refused Thursday to boost their offers of support for Moscow.
NEWS
April 3, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the eve of the U.S.-Russian summit here, President Boris N. Yeltsin's embattled government won at least $15 billion in debt relief Friday from a West openly worried about his chances for political survival. Canada and Britain also announced sizable increases in their aid programs for Russia.
NEWS
July 6, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The locale is the worst Boris N. Yeltsin could have wished for. And the countries he has been counting on for help are either in economic doldrums or full-blown recession. Is it any wonder, then, that Russia's leader will not be going to the Tokyo summit with the Group of Seven with his hand conspicuously out?
NEWS
July 10, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pushing the world's richest nations hard for increased foreign trade, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin on Friday got billions in additional aid instead. He expressed gratitude, but also regret. "The biggest disappointment I have from the meeting is that to my energetic calls came the reply: 'Yes, yes. It's hard. We'll have to solve those problems,' " Yeltsin said dryly after he met with President Clinton and the rest of the Group of Seven leaders.
NEWS
April 2, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the economy of Russia and the rest of what was the Soviet Union shrinking week after week, the $24 billion in assistance that the United States and its partners offered Moscow on Wednesday will hardly restore its previous strength--and may not even halt the collapse. But the Western aid was calculated on a different basis--as a financial underpinning for the economic restructuring finally undertaken by President Boris N. Yeltsin and as clear support for him amid spreading malaise.
NEWS
July 6, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The locale is the worst Boris N. Yeltsin could have wished for. And the countries he has been counting on for help are either in economic doldrums or full-blown recession. Is it any wonder, then, that Russia's leader will not be going to the Tokyo summit with the Group of Seven with his hand conspicuously out?
NEWS
April 30, 1993 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four days after Russian voters gave President Boris N. Yeltsin a strong vote of confidence, the United States' major financial allies refused Thursday to boost their offers of support for Moscow.
NEWS
April 15, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Clinton Administration announced today that it wants to double the level of U.S. aid to Russia and said it is asking Congress for an immediate $1.8 billion increase on top of the current $1.6 billion contribution. Secretary of State Warren Christopher unveiled the proposed new aid plan at a meeting here of the world's seven biggest industrial powers, which concluded today by announcing a multinational aid package for Russia of $43.4 billion--about what had been expected. U.S.
NEWS
April 14, 1993 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Guided by the failures of the past and haunted by deep concern about an uncertain future, the foreign and finance ministers of the leading industrial democracies begin the daunting task today of cementing a sketchy plan to bail out Russia's struggling economy and keep its political reform on track. Stressing the urgency of the mission and alluding to the precarious nature of Russia's democracy, U.S.
NEWS
April 13, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and other major economic powers have agreed to extend Russia a quick $3 billion in long-term loans as soon as the government of President Boris N. Yeltsin takes initial steps to bring inflation under control, senior Clinton Administration officials said Monday.
NEWS
April 10, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin gathered Moscow's diplomatic corps in the Kremlin on Friday and made an unabashed pitch for more foreign aid to safeguard his presidency, which Russians will judge in a referendum later this month. The consequences of his failure or ouster, Yeltsin warned, could be worldwide destabilization and a renewal of the nuclear menace. "Russian changes will bring feasible results more quickly if the developed nations render assistance," said Yeltsin, who won a pledge of $1.
NEWS
April 2, 1992 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States and its major diplomatic partners unveiled a $24-billion program Wednesday to bolster Russia's struggling economy, stabilize its currency and provide far-reaching support for the long transition to a market system. The United States will contribute $5 billion. The program is the most comprehensive assistance package offered to Russia since the Communist Soviet Union fragmented and its republics were left to fashion independent economies on their own.
NEWS
November 20, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The world's richest industrialized nations, struggling to shore up the collapsing Soviet economy, on Tuesday offered Moscow an aid package worth several billion dollars, including new credits and a freeze on interest payments on its crushing foreign debt. But Russian Federation President Boris N.
NEWS
April 10, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and its allies, seeking to boost Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin's chances of success in his April 25 referendum, are trying to assemble a multinational aid package of $40 billion or more that can be unveiled next week, senior Western officials said Friday.
NEWS
April 3, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the eve of the U.S.-Russian summit here, President Boris N. Yeltsin's embattled government won at least $15 billion in debt relief Friday from a West openly worried about his chances for political survival. Canada and Britain also announced sizable increases in their aid programs for Russia.
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