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BUSINESS
October 18, 1999 | ANNETTE HADDAD and SCOTT DOGGETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's nothing better than a good roof to protect you from the elements, as anyone doing business in Russia today will tell you. A Russian "roof" will shelter you from arson, shakedowns, meddlesome bureaucrats, bribe-hungry tax officials--for a price, of course.
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BUSINESS
October 18, 1999 | ANNETTE HADDAD and SCOTT DOGGETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's nothing better than a good roof to protect you from the elements, as anyone doing business in Russia today will tell you. A Russian "roof" will shelter you from arson, shakedowns, meddlesome bureaucrats, bribe-hungry tax officials--for a price, of course.
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BUSINESS
February 13, 1998 | Times Staff and Wire Services
ICN Pharmaceuticals Inc. said it will invest $300 million in Russia over the next five years. ICN, which draws more than half its revenue from East European operations, has invested $120 million in Russia in the last three years to operate five pharmaceutical businesses. The additional investment includes $47 million to build a pharmaceutical plant as part of an ongoing modernization of the St. Petersburg division, which should be completed in 2000.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1998 | Times Staff and Wire Services
ICN Pharmaceuticals Inc. said it will invest $300 million in Russia over the next five years. ICN, which draws more than half its revenue from East European operations, has invested $120 million in Russia in the last three years to operate five pharmaceutical businesses. The additional investment includes $47 million to build a pharmaceutical plant as part of an ongoing modernization of the St. Petersburg division, which should be completed in 2000.
NEWS
August 23, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fallen apples and yellowed leaves from a tree sheltering the grave of Paul Edward Tatum are the only tributes to the slain American hotelier whose ashes now rest at Kuntsevo Cemetery in a remote Moscow suburb. Nine months after the 41-year-old Oklahoman was gunned down in an apparent contract killing, his memory and legacy have been virtually erased from the booming capitalist landscape he helped bring into being.
NEWS
November 23, 1991 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin said Friday that the Russian economy will be open for foreign investment in coming weeks and that Germany can expect "the greatest most-favored-nation status and freedom of trade possible." Yeltsin's comments came as he met with political and industrial leaders on the second day of his first major foreign relations tour since the failed Kremlin coup effectively made him his nation's most powerful leader.
OPINION
October 31, 2003
It's hard to feel sympathy for Russia's industrial oligarchs. After communism's collapse, they bought up state industries in the 1990s at fire-sale prices and overnight became billionaires, even as many Russians were plunged into poverty. Still, President Vladimir V. Putin's arrest of oil tycoon Mikhail Khodorkovsky is no cause for joy. Putin presents the recent seizure of Khodorkovsky by masked commandos as part of a judicial campaign against corruption.
NEWS
August 23, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fallen apples and yellowed leaves from a tree sheltering the grave of Paul Edward Tatum are the only tributes to the slain American hotelier whose ashes now rest at Kuntsevo Cemetery in a remote Moscow suburb. Nine months after the 41-year-old Oklahoman was gunned down in an apparent contract killing, his memory and legacy have been virtually erased from the booming capitalist landscape he helped bring into being.
NEWS
November 23, 1991 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin said Friday that the Russian economy will be open for foreign investment in coming weeks and that Germany can expect "the greatest most-favored-nation status and freedom of trade possible." Yeltsin's comments came as he met with political and industrial leaders on the second day of his first major foreign relations tour since the failed Kremlin coup effectively made him his nation's most powerful leader.
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