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March 25, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After more than a decade of whiplash-inducing swings in Russian foreign policy, says prominent Sinologist Mikhail L. Titarenko, this country's trademark eagle finally has its heads on straight. "The traditional crest of Russia is a two-headed eagle, but for the past few years both heads have been turned toward the West," the director of the Institute of Far Eastern Studies says mockingly of the policies of former foreign ministers Andrei V. Kozyrev and Eduard A. Shevardnadze.
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NEWS
August 17, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The news in Russia on Wednesday was that the knocking sounds from the trapped Russian nuclear submarine had stopped. Irina Zhuravina had the television on loud, her eyes locked on the haggard face of the mother of one of the crew members, and 32 years of grief and anger came rushing back. She pulled out a map and showed the place, marked in red ink, where her husband's Golf-class submarine, K-129, sank in 1968 in 16,000 feet of water in the Pacific.
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NEWS
July 11, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Foreign Minister Igor S. Ivanov set out a new foreign policy doctrine Monday, announcing that Russia's approach will be more focused and pragmatic because of the country's limited resources. While asserting that Russia remains a superpower, Ivanov said the nation has to concentrate more on areas of strategic interest. "Today, our foreign policy resources are relatively limited. And they will be concentrated in fields that are vital for Russia," Ivanov said.
NEWS
July 11, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Foreign Minister Igor S. Ivanov set out a new foreign policy doctrine Monday, announcing that Russia's approach will be more focused and pragmatic because of the country's limited resources. While asserting that Russia remains a superpower, Ivanov said the nation has to concentrate more on areas of strategic interest. "Today, our foreign policy resources are relatively limited. And they will be concentrated in fields that are vital for Russia," Ivanov said.
NEWS
January 10, 1996 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tapping a spymaster with close ties to the Arab world to lead Russia's foreign policy, President Boris N. Yeltsin on Tuesday appointed intelligence chief Yevgeny M. Primakov as his new foreign minister. Primakov, 66, has directed the Russian Foreign Intelligence Service for the past five years, and by some accounts has succeeded in boosting morale and limiting the number of defections.
NEWS
April 21, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In just three days, Russian Foreign Minister Andrei V. Kozyrev has upset Baltic leaders with a threat of force to protect minority Russians, paralyzed Tajik peace talks with a hint of military intervention and sparked fears of resurgent Russian nationalism throughout the "near abroad."
NEWS
February 25, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin's State of the Nation speech on Thursday took a distinctly harder line on foreign policy, promising that Russia will pursue its national interests more vigorously and is prepared to get tough when necessary. Though the speech was crafted for domestic consumption, its assertive stance signals Moscow's independence from the West at a time when Russia is suffering from superpower nostalgia and wounded national pride.
NEWS
January 6, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The long humiliation of Foreign Minister Andrei V. Kozyrev culminated Friday in a presidential decree announcing his dismissal and fresh slights against the diplomat who once personified the democratic promise of a new Russia. President Boris N. Yeltsin's decision to sack his longest-serving Cabinet minister underscored a hawkish trend that has pervaded Kremlin relations with the West as Russians' commitment to reform weakens from a protracted and painful transition.
NEWS
January 30, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Russia stretches across the world map, it looks like a slimmed-down Soviet Union, stripped now of most of its possessions in the Baltics, the Caucasus and Central Asia and split away from its Slavic neighbors, Ukraine and Belarus, yet nonetheless a colossus astride Europe and Asia. Yet, this Russia is showing itself to be a different country with a different government, and to have a different president with a different foreign policy than that of the old Soviet Union.
NEWS
March 8, 1994 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration, sobered by the new, more nationalistic tone of Russia's foreign policy, is reluctantly cooling its once-warm embrace of Moscow as a reliable strategic "partner" for the West. In unannounced steps over the last few weeks, the Administration has shifted to a markedly tougher policy on international loans to Russia and has warned Moscow against military or political intervention in neighboring countries, senior officials said.
NEWS
January 15, 2000 | From Associated Press
Russia unveiled its new national security doctrine Friday, broadening the Kremlin's authority to use nuclear weapons and accusing the United States of trying to weaken Russia and become the world's dominant power. The doctrine replaces one adopted in 1997, a time when political and military partnership with the West were still buzzwords and many Russians were optimistic about the country's economic future.
NEWS
March 25, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After more than a decade of whiplash-inducing swings in Russian foreign policy, says prominent Sinologist Mikhail L. Titarenko, this country's trademark eagle finally has its heads on straight. "The traditional crest of Russia is a two-headed eagle, but for the past few years both heads have been turned toward the West," the director of the Institute of Far Eastern Studies says mockingly of the policies of former foreign ministers Andrei V. Kozyrev and Eduard A. Shevardnadze.
NEWS
January 10, 1996 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tapping a spymaster with close ties to the Arab world to lead Russia's foreign policy, President Boris N. Yeltsin on Tuesday appointed intelligence chief Yevgeny M. Primakov as his new foreign minister. Primakov, 66, has directed the Russian Foreign Intelligence Service for the past five years, and by some accounts has succeeded in boosting morale and limiting the number of defections.
NEWS
January 6, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The long humiliation of Foreign Minister Andrei V. Kozyrev culminated Friday in a presidential decree announcing his dismissal and fresh slights against the diplomat who once personified the democratic promise of a new Russia. President Boris N. Yeltsin's decision to sack his longest-serving Cabinet minister underscored a hawkish trend that has pervaded Kremlin relations with the West as Russians' commitment to reform weakens from a protracted and painful transition.
NEWS
October 22, 1995 | MICHAEL TARM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the dark days of Stalinist rule, young Lennart Meri went to bed every night with headphones from his makeshift shortwave radio clamped to his head and Western broadcasts buzzing in his ears. "That radio was very important for me," said Meri, now president of this pro-reform ex-Soviet republic. "It meant I was never stranded. I always knew what was going on in the world."
NEWS
October 21, 1995 | From Associated Press
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin on Friday backed off hints that he might fire Foreign Minister Andrei V. Kozyrev, bringing him along on a state visit to France and saying his job may be safe--with the right underling in place. Kozyrev met with his French counterpart, Herve de Charette, to discuss Russia's role in the Bosnian peace process and the enlargement of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.
NEWS
October 22, 1995 | MICHAEL TARM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the dark days of Stalinist rule, young Lennart Meri went to bed every night with headphones from his makeshift shortwave radio clamped to his head and Western broadcasts buzzing in his ears. "That radio was very important for me," said Meri, now president of this pro-reform ex-Soviet republic. "It meant I was never stranded. I always knew what was going on in the world."
NEWS
September 1, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was little breast-beating. No moaning about strategic territory lost. Russia's equanimity on Wednesday as it watched what some here call "The Great Retreat" pointed up just how deeply the Kremlin's foreign and military doctrine have changed since the Cold War. With only a few spasms of nostalgia, Moscow marched away from the German bases that for decades served as the beefed-up vanguard for a possible land war in Europe. President Boris N. Yeltsin called the Russian withdrawal "natural."
NEWS
April 21, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In just three days, Russian Foreign Minister Andrei V. Kozyrev has upset Baltic leaders with a threat of force to protect minority Russians, paralyzed Tajik peace talks with a hint of military intervention and sparked fears of resurgent Russian nationalism throughout the "near abroad."
NEWS
September 1, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was little breast-beating. No moaning about strategic territory lost. Russia's equanimity on Wednesday as it watched what some here call "The Great Retreat" pointed up just how deeply the Kremlin's foreign and military doctrine have changed since the Cold War. With only a few spasms of nostalgia, Moscow marched away from the German bases that for decades served as the beefed-up vanguard for a possible land war in Europe. President Boris N. Yeltsin called the Russian withdrawal "natural."
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