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Russia Foreign Policy

NEWS
April 19, 2002 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By most indicators, life in Russia is better than it has been at any time since the collapse of the Soviet Union a decade ago. But that's not what President Vladimir V. Putin told citizens Thursday in his annual state of the nation address. Putin painted a bleak picture of his nation's future: too-slow growth, too-stiff international competition, too many poor people. And few friends willing to ease Russia's way into the global economy. "No one is going to war with us.
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OPINION
September 17, 1995 | Steven Merritt Miner, Steven Merritt Miner, a professor of Russian history at Ohio University, is a contributor to "The "Diplomats" (Princeton University). He is currently working on a book, "Selling Stalin," about Soviet propaganda
The sharp Russian denunciations of NATO's bombing raids against the Bosnian Serbs have taken many by surprise. After all, the Cold War is over, and Russia even voted for the U.N. resolution permitting the use of force in the Balkans. It thus seems puzzling that the Russians should be so angry. In a rare press conference last week, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin answered most questions calmly, but he suddenly became quite animated, even emotional, when asked about the NATO air campaign.
NEWS
May 4, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian special envoy Viktor S. Chernomyrdin's meeting Monday with President Clinton to discuss a peace plan for Kosovo was one of the brightest moments yet in the former prime minister's political comeback. Booted out of the Russian government by President Boris N. Yeltsin more than a year ago, Chernomyrdin was later rejected by parliament as well. His opinion poll ratings hit rock bottom, and his chances of becoming Russia's next president were reduced to rubble.
NEWS
January 28, 2000 | TYLER MARSHALL and MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright's planned trip to Moscow next week--the first by a ranking U.S. official since Vladimir V. Putin became acting Russian president last month--marks the start of a concerted Clinton administration effort to rebuild relations that have soured dangerously over the past five years. "This is not the normal kind of meeting," said an administration official who requested anonymity.
NEWS
January 16, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A month ago, Russia's image as a fledgling democracy and partner with the West was shattered. Vladimir V. Zhirinovsky, having stunned the world with a strong finish in parliamentary elections, was venting militarist dreams of a restored Russian empire. President Boris N. Yeltsin was in seclusion. Last week, Yeltsin was back in the spotlight, appearing with President Clinton at the Kremlin.
NEWS
December 18, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin said Thursday that Russia sees tremendous prospects for military cooperation with China and could undertake a large-scale overhaul of China's 1950s-era Soviet weapons. "The prospects are very, very great," Yeltsin told reporters when asked about future Sino-Russian military dealings as he strolled along the serpentine fortifications of the Great Wall of China.
WORLD
August 15, 2002 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time since Russia and Belarus signed a "union" treaty six years ago, the presidents of the two countries outlined a merger scenario Wednesday that would in effect allow Russia to absorb the smaller country. However, hours later the Belarussian leader appeared to back away from the proposal, leaving its future in confusion. Under the plan described by Russian President Vladimir V.
OPINION
March 10, 1996 | Carol J. Williams, Carol J. Williams is Moscow bureau chief for The Times
His voice, always soft, is reduced to a whisper by yet another tragedy in what has been a devastating year. But only hours after learning his country home had burned down, former Russian Foreign Minister Andrei V. Kozyrev exhibits little sign of distraction.
WORLD
August 7, 2009 | Megan K. Stack
Last August, fresh off a swift, decisive military victory over U.S.-backed Georgia, the Kremlin basked in newfound international power and domestic prestige: Oil was booming. Anti-Western taunts and propaganda crammed state media. A dramatic message about resurgent Russian strength had been unequivocally delivered. One year later, the euphoria has evaporated.
NEWS
April 9, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS and DOYLE MCMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Had he the courage, says Vladimir P. Lukin, Russia's new ambassador to the United States, he would have been a full-fledged dissident in the 1960s and 1970s like Sakharov and Solzhenitsyn. Had he the talent, Lukin continues, he would have liked to compose poetry and write great works of philosophy like his friends among Russia's intelligentsia.
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