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NEWS
March 25, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After more than a decade of whiplash-inducing swings in Russian foreign policy, says prominent Sinologist Mikhail L. Titarenko, this country's trademark eagle finally has its heads on straight. "The traditional crest of Russia is a two-headed eagle, but for the past few years both heads have been turned toward the West," the director of the Institute of Far Eastern Studies says mockingly of the policies of former foreign ministers Andrei V. Kozyrev and Eduard A. Shevardnadze.
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NEWS
July 11, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Foreign Minister Igor S. Ivanov set out a new foreign policy doctrine Monday, announcing that Russia's approach will be more focused and pragmatic because of the country's limited resources. While asserting that Russia remains a superpower, Ivanov said the nation has to concentrate more on areas of strategic interest. "Today, our foreign policy resources are relatively limited. And they will be concentrated in fields that are vital for Russia," Ivanov said.
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NEWS
July 11, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Foreign Minister Igor S. Ivanov set out a new foreign policy doctrine Monday, announcing that Russia's approach will be more focused and pragmatic because of the country's limited resources. While asserting that Russia remains a superpower, Ivanov said the nation has to concentrate more on areas of strategic interest. "Today, our foreign policy resources are relatively limited. And they will be concentrated in fields that are vital for Russia," Ivanov said.
BUSINESS
December 22, 1999 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration blocked $498 million in loan guarantees to Russia on Tuesday, in a striking signal of displeasure with Russia's economic corruption and an indirect protest of its brutal military campaign in Chechnya. The action was announced late in the day by the State Department and the Export-Import Bank, an independent agency that had been intent on approving the aid for energy projects in Siberia and Moscow until White House officials expressed their concerns.
NEWS
December 9, 1994 | SONNI EFRON and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The West was stunned last week to see a cornered Russia strike back with unexpected ferocity against plans to expand NATO eastward, moving a still-frightening Cold War enemy 500 miles closer to Russia's borders. To anyone who has read a Russian newspaper recently, it should have come as no surprise. In the three years since the collapse of the Soviet Union, Russia has rediscovered that it has national interests that do not coincide with those of the West.
NEWS
July 9, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin lands here today with a long-coveted invitation to the World's Most Important Countries Club, marking a new phase in Russia's bumpy rapprochement with the West. For the first time, Yeltsin does not come seeking international aid. Rather, he aims to show the West that Russia, however troubled, is no longer a charity case.
NEWS
December 10, 1993 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an arrangement that could lead to full NATO membership, Russia is "quite likely" to join the United States and European nations in joint military exercises expected to begin as early as next year, U.S. and NATO officials said here Thursday. U.S.
NEWS
June 10, 1994 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As part of their efforts to build a new, post-Cold War relationship with Moscow, the United States and its European allies Thursday urged Russia to immediately join a program of military cooperation and begin an extensive political dialogue with NATO. "Good, cooperative relations between NATO and Russia will be a key element for security and stability in Europe," stated a communique issued after a meeting here of the foreign ministers from the 16-member North Atlantic Treaty Organization.
NEWS
June 11, 1994 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite its obvious disappointment at terms offered by its longtime adversaries, Moscow is ready to enter a military partnership with the United States and its European allies, Russian leaders said Friday. At separate news conferences, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin and his foreign minister, Andrei V. Kozyrev, stressed that Russia will sign the military cooperation agreement with the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.
NEWS
December 24, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia is now a country at war. The combat theater is small, the location obscure and the casualties likely to remain a relative trickle compared to those in Rwanda or Bosnia. But when the Kremlin decided to break Chechnya's bid for independence by military force, when it began dropping bombs on what it considers Russian towns and shelling Russian citizens, it crossed a line beyond which only one thing is sure: This Eurasian colossus has become a more volatile place.
NEWS
March 25, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After more than a decade of whiplash-inducing swings in Russian foreign policy, says prominent Sinologist Mikhail L. Titarenko, this country's trademark eagle finally has its heads on straight. "The traditional crest of Russia is a two-headed eagle, but for the past few years both heads have been turned toward the West," the director of the Institute of Far Eastern Studies says mockingly of the policies of former foreign ministers Andrei V. Kozyrev and Eduard A. Shevardnadze.
NEWS
December 24, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia is now a country at war. The combat theater is small, the location obscure and the casualties likely to remain a relative trickle compared to those in Rwanda or Bosnia. But when the Kremlin decided to break Chechnya's bid for independence by military force, when it began dropping bombs on what it considers Russian towns and shelling Russian citizens, it crossed a line beyond which only one thing is sure: This Eurasian colossus has become a more volatile place.
NEWS
December 9, 1994 | SONNI EFRON and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The West was stunned last week to see a cornered Russia strike back with unexpected ferocity against plans to expand NATO eastward, moving a still-frightening Cold War enemy 500 miles closer to Russia's borders. To anyone who has read a Russian newspaper recently, it should have come as no surprise. In the three years since the collapse of the Soviet Union, Russia has rediscovered that it has national interests that do not coincide with those of the West.
NEWS
December 3, 1994 | TYLER MARSHALL and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It was a perfect diplomatic ambush. Russian Foreign Minister Andrei V. Kozyrev had said his country was ready to agree to a long-awaited working arrangement with NATO, and he wanted a high-profile ceremony--a brief formal exchange of documents in front of the cameras, lots of cameras.
NEWS
July 9, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin lands here today with a long-coveted invitation to the World's Most Important Countries Club, marking a new phase in Russia's bumpy rapprochement with the West. For the first time, Yeltsin does not come seeking international aid. Rather, he aims to show the West that Russia, however troubled, is no longer a charity case.
NEWS
June 11, 1994 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite its obvious disappointment at terms offered by its longtime adversaries, Moscow is ready to enter a military partnership with the United States and its European allies, Russian leaders said Friday. At separate news conferences, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin and his foreign minister, Andrei V. Kozyrev, stressed that Russia will sign the military cooperation agreement with the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.
NEWS
March 11, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ignoring a public snub, former U.S. President Richard Nixon said Thursday that his friendship and support for Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin remain untarnished. "I came here as his friend and I remain his friend. I wish him well," Nixon said at a reception in his honor given by the U.S. ambassador. No high-ranking Russian official attended.
NEWS
December 3, 1994 | TYLER MARSHALL and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It was a perfect diplomatic ambush. Russian Foreign Minister Andrei V. Kozyrev had said his country was ready to agree to a long-awaited working arrangement with NATO, and he wanted a high-profile ceremony--a brief formal exchange of documents in front of the cameras, lots of cameras.
NEWS
June 10, 1994 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As part of their efforts to build a new, post-Cold War relationship with Moscow, the United States and its European allies Thursday urged Russia to immediately join a program of military cooperation and begin an extensive political dialogue with NATO. "Good, cooperative relations between NATO and Russia will be a key element for security and stability in Europe," stated a communique issued after a meeting here of the foreign ministers from the 16-member North Atlantic Treaty Organization.
NEWS
March 11, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ignoring a public snub, former U.S. President Richard Nixon said Thursday that his friendship and support for Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin remain untarnished. "I came here as his friend and I remain his friend. I wish him well," Nixon said at a reception in his honor given by the U.S. ambassador. No high-ranking Russian official attended.
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