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February 12, 2000 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At one level, the arrival of China's first Russian-built guided-missile destroyer in East Asian waters in recent days is a troubling reminder of the budding military relationship between two nuclear giants increasingly wary of U.S. intentions. The $500-million Sovremenny-class destroyer and its sophisticated anti-ship missiles, which passed through the Taiwan Strait on Friday, provide a new dimension to China's modest navy: the ability to confront U.S. aircraft carriers.
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NEWS
February 12, 2000 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At one level, the arrival of China's first Russian-built guided-missile destroyer in East Asian waters in recent days is a troubling reminder of the budding military relationship between two nuclear giants increasingly wary of U.S. intentions. The $500-million Sovremenny-class destroyer and its sophisticated anti-ship missiles, which passed through the Taiwan Strait on Friday, provide a new dimension to China's modest navy: the ability to confront U.S. aircraft carriers.
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NEWS
December 30, 1997 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia and China made final Monday a deal worth up to $3.5 billion in a joint venture to build a nuclear plant near Shanghai as part of Beijing's plans to meet its fast-expanding power needs by constructing 100 reactors in the next 50 years. The two 1,000-megawatt units of the Russian-built plant at Lianyungang, a coastal city about 250 miles north of Shanghai, are to begin operating in 2004 and 2005, the official New China News Agency reported.
NEWS
December 30, 1997 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia and China made final Monday a deal worth up to $3.5 billion in a joint venture to build a nuclear plant near Shanghai as part of Beijing's plans to meet its fast-expanding power needs by constructing 100 reactors in the next 50 years. The two 1,000-megawatt units of the Russian-built plant at Lianyungang, a coastal city about 250 miles north of Shanghai, are to begin operating in 2004 and 2005, the official New China News Agency reported.
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