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NEWS
March 24, 1993 | MARY MYCIO and RICHARD BOUDREAUX, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Oleksandr Kovtunenko heard Sunday that Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin might be impeached, the young Ukrainian businessman decided to buy a gun, "the biggest I could find," in case of an invasion by imperialists from Moscow. "I will fight against anyone to defend Ukraine," Kovtunenko said, nervously sipping coffee in a Kiev cafe. Serhij Nechitailo, his business partner, had a safer idea. A plane ticket to the West, he suggested, might be a better bargain.
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NEWS
February 11, 1995 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three years after the collapse of the Soviet Union, the shattered heartland of the former superpower is slowly starting to glue itself back together. In the last month, Russia has signed unprecedented agreements for military and economic integration with Kazakhstan and Belarus, and this week Moscow struck a deal on a long-delayed friendship treaty with Ukraine.
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NEWS
January 23, 1993 | ANDREI OSTROUKH and CAREY GOLDBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Only seven out of 11 countries signed the new charter of the Commonwealth of Independent States at a critical summit Friday, dashing Russian hopes that the loose grouping of nations could now evolve into a closer union. Ukraine, Moldova and Turkmenistan rejected the Commonwealth charter, agreeing instead only to a declaration leaving the door open for signing the 27-page document within the next year.
NEWS
January 19, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sign of resurgent Russian nationalism, Foreign Minister Andrei D. Kozyrev asserted Tuesday that Russia must maintain a long-term "military presence" in the former Soviet republics beyond its borders. The statement, made to Russian ambassadors gathered in Moscow and reported by two Russian news agencies, raised alarm in Estonia and Latvia that President Boris N.
NEWS
January 19, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sign of resurgent Russian nationalism, Foreign Minister Andrei D. Kozyrev asserted Tuesday that Russia must maintain a long-term "military presence" in the former Soviet republics beyond its borders. The statement, made to Russian ambassadors gathered in Moscow and reported by two Russian news agencies, raised alarm in Estonia and Latvia that President Boris N.
NEWS
January 30, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Russia stretches across the world map, it looks like a slimmed-down Soviet Union, stripped now of most of its possessions in the Baltics, the Caucasus and Central Asia and split away from its Slavic neighbors, Ukraine and Belarus, yet nonetheless a colossus astride Europe and Asia. Yet, this Russia is showing itself to be a different country with a different government, and to have a different president with a different foreign policy than that of the old Soviet Union.
NEWS
February 11, 1995 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three years after the collapse of the Soviet Union, the shattered heartland of the former superpower is slowly starting to glue itself back together. In the last month, Russia has signed unprecedented agreements for military and economic integration with Kazakhstan and Belarus, and this week Moscow struck a deal on a long-delayed friendship treaty with Ukraine.
NEWS
March 24, 1993 | MARY MYCIO and RICHARD BOUDREAUX, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Oleksandr Kovtunenko heard Sunday that Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin might be impeached, the young Ukrainian businessman decided to buy a gun, "the biggest I could find," in case of an invasion by imperialists from Moscow. "I will fight against anyone to defend Ukraine," Kovtunenko said, nervously sipping coffee in a Kiev cafe. Serhij Nechitailo, his business partner, had a safer idea. A plane ticket to the West, he suggested, might be a better bargain.
NEWS
January 23, 1993 | ANDREI OSTROUKH and CAREY GOLDBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Only seven out of 11 countries signed the new charter of the Commonwealth of Independent States at a critical summit Friday, dashing Russian hopes that the loose grouping of nations could now evolve into a closer union. Ukraine, Moldova and Turkmenistan rejected the Commonwealth charter, agreeing instead only to a declaration leaving the door open for signing the 27-page document within the next year.
NEWS
January 30, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Russia stretches across the world map, it looks like a slimmed-down Soviet Union, stripped now of most of its possessions in the Baltics, the Caucasus and Central Asia and split away from its Slavic neighbors, Ukraine and Belarus, yet nonetheless a colossus astride Europe and Asia. Yet, this Russia is showing itself to be a different country with a different government, and to have a different president with a different foreign policy than that of the old Soviet Union.
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