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NEWS
December 5, 1992 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Russia's economy in tatters, Vice President Alexandr V. Rutskoi stood in the Great Kremlin Palace and spoke with controlled indignation on a matter of national pride. "We must remember our history," he said. "The way out of this crisis must be based on our own possibilities and not on a mystical hope that the West will help us. Nobody in the West is willing to create a competitor with his own hands."
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NEWS
July 6, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The locale is the worst Boris N. Yeltsin could have wished for. And the countries he has been counting on for help are either in economic doldrums or full-blown recession. Is it any wonder, then, that Russia's leader will not be going to the Tokyo summit with the Group of Seven with his hand conspicuously out?
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NEWS
April 3, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the eve of the U.S.-Russian summit here, President Boris N. Yeltsin's embattled government won at least $15 billion in debt relief Friday from a West openly worried about his chances for political survival. Canada and Britain also announced sizable increases in their aid programs for Russia.
NEWS
April 10, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin gathered Moscow's diplomatic corps in the Kremlin on Friday and made an unabashed pitch for more foreign aid to safeguard his presidency, which Russians will judge in a referendum later this month. The consequences of his failure or ouster, Yeltsin warned, could be worldwide destabilization and a renewal of the nuclear menace. "Russian changes will bring feasible results more quickly if the developed nations render assistance," said Yeltsin, who won a pledge of $1.
NEWS
July 6, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The locale is the worst Boris N. Yeltsin could have wished for. And the countries he has been counting on for help are either in economic doldrums or full-blown recession. Is it any wonder, then, that Russia's leader will not be going to the Tokyo summit with the Group of Seven with his hand conspicuously out?
NEWS
March 25, 1993 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian Foreign Minister Andrei V. Kozyrev met Wednesday with President Clinton and appealed to Americans to approve a generous Russian aid package for the benefit of their country as well as his own. Kozyrev, in a speech at American University here, vowed that American support for Russian reform "will pay off many times over in the form of American exports, more jobs in America and a more stable and predictable development of the world economy."
NEWS
April 10, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin gathered Moscow's diplomatic corps in the Kremlin on Friday and made an unabashed pitch for more foreign aid to safeguard his presidency, which Russians will judge in a referendum later this month. The consequences of his failure or ouster, Yeltsin warned, could be worldwide destabilization and a renewal of the nuclear menace. "Russian changes will bring feasible results more quickly if the developed nations render assistance," said Yeltsin, who won a pledge of $1.
NEWS
April 10, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and its allies, seeking to boost Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin's chances of success in his April 25 referendum, are trying to assemble a multinational aid package of $40 billion or more that can be unveiled next week, senior Western officials said Friday.
NEWS
April 10, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and its allies, seeking to boost Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin's chances of success in his April 25 referendum, are trying to assemble a multinational aid package of $40 billion or more that can be unveiled next week, senior Western officials said Friday.
NEWS
April 3, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the eve of the U.S.-Russian summit here, President Boris N. Yeltsin's embattled government won at least $15 billion in debt relief Friday from a West openly worried about his chances for political survival. Canada and Britain also announced sizable increases in their aid programs for Russia.
NEWS
March 25, 1993 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian Foreign Minister Andrei V. Kozyrev met Wednesday with President Clinton and appealed to Americans to approve a generous Russian aid package for the benefit of their country as well as his own. Kozyrev, in a speech at American University here, vowed that American support for Russian reform "will pay off many times over in the form of American exports, more jobs in America and a more stable and predictable development of the world economy."
NEWS
December 5, 1992 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Russia's economy in tatters, Vice President Alexandr V. Rutskoi stood in the Great Kremlin Palace and spoke with controlled indignation on a matter of national pride. "We must remember our history," he said. "The way out of this crisis must be based on our own possibilities and not on a mystical hope that the West will help us. Nobody in the West is willing to create a competitor with his own hands."
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