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NEWS
February 11, 1994 | PAUL RICHTER and SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
They can shoot astronauts into space together, but apparently the United States and Russia cannot arrange a phone call between their leaders. Because of what is being described as "technical and scheduling" difficulties, President Clinton has been unable for two days to get through to Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin to discuss the North Atlantic Treaty Organization demand that the Bosnian Serbs withdraw their artillery from Sarajevo.
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NEWS
January 21, 1996 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a muddy stretch of land next to a smoke-spewing power plant, Russian paratroopers--with the help of American soldiers--are busy setting up the main base for the 1,500-member Russian contingent of the multinational force attempting to make peace in Bosnia. The cooperation between Russian and American troops in the 60,000-strong international peacekeeping force is a post-Cold War first.
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NEWS
April 9, 1993 | Times Staff Writer
Russia tried to weaken and delay a U.N. sanctions resolution against Serbia on Thursday, but the Security Council rejected the move and decided to follow its original plan to approve the sanctions next Monday, diplomatic sources said. The sources said the Russian attempt upset U.S. Ambassador Madeleine Albright, who said she was "astounded and totally surprised" by the long list of amendments presented by Russian Ambassador Yuli M. Vorontsov at a closed session of the council.
NEWS
December 24, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On frozen swampland along the Volga River, Pvt. Andrei V. Bekuzarov crawls with his sniper rifle toward an imaginary target, imperceptible in a sheath of white cotton camouflage as he winnows through the snow. While his aim is steady and his movement stealthy, the 19-year-old soldier training for duty with the NATO-led peacekeeping force in Bosnia-Herzegovina refuses to contemplate whom he is pretending to shoot.
NEWS
May 4, 1993
Secretary of State Warren Christopher is due in the Russian capital today to consult with President Boris N. Yeltsin and other top officials on possible next moves for stopping bloodshed in the former Yugoslav federation. Russia has been urging diplomacy although Yeltsin last week warned the Serbs that if they continued to reject international peace plans, Russia would not stand by them.
NEWS
February 19, 1994 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With two days left before a deadline for allied air strikes in Bosnia-Herzegovina, the Clinton Administration gave a mixed response Friday to Moscow's proposal to move Russian troops there, publicly welcoming the initiative but privately expressing concern about the possible effect on efforts to end the siege of Sarajevo.
NEWS
January 21, 1996 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a muddy stretch of land next to a smoke-spewing power plant, Russian paratroopers--with the help of American soldiers--are busy setting up the main base for the 1,500-member Russian contingent of the multinational force attempting to make peace in Bosnia. The cooperation between Russian and American troops in the 60,000-strong international peacekeeping force is a post-Cold War first.
NEWS
February 14, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new U.S. special envoy to the Balkans, Reginald Bartholomew, won assurances Saturday that Russia will cooperate to end ethnic warfare there but was warned that the Russian legislature will resist tougher sanctions against Serbia. "We made a thorough analysis of the state of affairs in the former Yugoslavia and agreed to work together to achieve a just and balanced settlement in Bosnia-Herzegovina," Russian Foreign Minister Andrei V. Kozyrev said after a 90-minute meeting with Bartholomew.
NEWS
March 10, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin, President Clinton and French President Francois Mitterrand all urged the warring factions in Bosnia-Herzegovina on Tuesday to accept the fundamental provisions of a United Nations peace plan. Yeltsin's statement was the clearest public signal yet of Russian pressure on the Serbs--who have long looked to Moscow as an ally--to accept the U.N. plan proposed by former Secretary of State Cyrus R. Vance and former British Foreign Secretary Lord Owen.
NEWS
July 26, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As British, French and U.S. diplomats warned Bosnian Serbs that the rebels were all but provoking massive NATO air strikes with their relentless attacks on U.N.-designated "safe areas," Russian Foreign Minister Andrei V. Kozyrev flew this week to the Serbian capital, Belgrade, to calm fears of Western reprisals.
NEWS
July 26, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As British, French and U.S. diplomats warned Bosnian Serbs that the rebels were all but provoking massive NATO air strikes with their relentless attacks on U.N.-designated "safe areas," Russian Foreign Minister Andrei V. Kozyrev flew this week to the Serbian capital, Belgrade, to calm fears of Western reprisals.
NEWS
April 15, 1994 | DOYLE McMANUS and RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The escalating warfare between Bosnian Serb forces and U.N. peacekeepers in Bosnia-Herzegovina claimed another casualty Thursday: plans for greater cooperation between Russia and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. Russian Foreign Minister Andrei D. Kozyrev announced in Moscow that he has postponed Russia's entry into the "Partnership for Peace," President Clinton's program for increased cooperation between NATO and the former Communist nations of Eastern Europe.
NEWS
February 19, 1994 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With two days left before a deadline for allied air strikes in Bosnia-Herzegovina, the Clinton Administration gave a mixed response Friday to Moscow's proposal to move Russian troops there, publicly welcoming the initiative but privately expressing concern about the possible effect on efforts to end the siege of Sarajevo.
NEWS
February 18, 1994 | DANICA KIRKA and CAROL J. WILLIAMS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bosnian Serb forces Thursday began what U.N. observers called a massive withdrawal from mountaintop artillery nests ringing Sarajevo, offering the first serious sign that they may comply with a NATO ultimatum to end their siege or face air strikes. U.N. officials reported large weapons convoys moving away from the Bosnian capital, an apparent effort by the Serbian rebels to comply with a week-old NATO order to withdraw or surrender all heavy weapons within a 12-mile radius of the capital by 1 a.
NEWS
February 11, 1994 | PAUL RICHTER and SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
They can shoot astronauts into space together, but apparently the United States and Russia cannot arrange a phone call between their leaders. Because of what is being described as "technical and scheduling" difficulties, President Clinton has been unable for two days to get through to Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin to discuss the North Atlantic Treaty Organization demand that the Bosnian Serbs withdraw their artillery from Sarajevo.
NEWS
May 4, 1993
Secretary of State Warren Christopher is due in the Russian capital today to consult with President Boris N. Yeltsin and other top officials on possible next moves for stopping bloodshed in the former Yugoslav federation. Russia has been urging diplomacy although Yeltsin last week warned the Serbs that if they continued to reject international peace plans, Russia would not stand by them.
NEWS
April 15, 1994 | DOYLE McMANUS and RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The escalating warfare between Bosnian Serb forces and U.N. peacekeepers in Bosnia-Herzegovina claimed another casualty Thursday: plans for greater cooperation between Russia and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. Russian Foreign Minister Andrei D. Kozyrev announced in Moscow that he has postponed Russia's entry into the "Partnership for Peace," President Clinton's program for increased cooperation between NATO and the former Communist nations of Eastern Europe.
NEWS
December 24, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On frozen swampland along the Volga River, Pvt. Andrei V. Bekuzarov crawls with his sniper rifle toward an imaginary target, imperceptible in a sheath of white cotton camouflage as he winnows through the snow. While his aim is steady and his movement stealthy, the 19-year-old soldier training for duty with the NATO-led peacekeeping force in Bosnia-Herzegovina refuses to contemplate whom he is pretending to shoot.
NEWS
April 28, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Serbian rebels launched a major assault Tuesday in northwestern Bosnia-Herzegovina in what appeared to be defiance of Western governments that have been threatening to use force to end the Balkan war. The attack took place as Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin issued a stern warning to the Serbs and Secretary of State Warren Christopher testified before a Senate panel on possible action in the Balkans. Their statements came as tougher U.N. economic sanctions against Yugoslavia took effect.
NEWS
April 9, 1993 | Times Staff Writer
Russia tried to weaken and delay a U.N. sanctions resolution against Serbia on Thursday, but the Security Council rejected the move and decided to follow its original plan to approve the sanctions next Monday, diplomatic sources said. The sources said the Russian attempt upset U.S. Ambassador Madeleine Albright, who said she was "astounded and totally surprised" by the long list of amendments presented by Russian Ambassador Yuli M. Vorontsov at a closed session of the council.
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