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NEWS
August 20, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
South Korea demanded compensation from Russia for the shooting down of a Korean jetliner in Soviet airspace 10 years ago. It was the first time that Seoul has officially asked for payment for the Sept. 1, 1983, attack on the Korean Air Lines Boeing 747, which killed 269 people, including 62 Americans. The former Soviet Union claimed that it mistook the passenger plane for a U.S. spy aircraft.
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NEWS
February 28, 2001 | From Reuters
The presidents of Russia and South Korea promised Tuesday to forge deeper ties, including plans to build a landmark railway link through North Korea that both leaders said could help bring peace to the divided Korean peninsula. Russian leader Vladimir V. Putin came to Seoul bearing Moscow's pledge of support for President Kim Dae Jung's efforts to thaw ties with the North. And he won Kim's backing for a key arms control treaty that the new U.S.
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NEWS
July 5, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Russian authorities ordered a South Korean diplomat expelled Saturday after he was detained on suspicion of spying. The diplomat, identified as Cho Sung Woo, was taken into custody overnight as he met with an alleged Russian contact, according to the Federal Security Service, a successor to the Soviet-era KGB. The contact, an employee of Russia's Foreign Ministry, was also detained, the statement said, The Russian was accused of spying for South Korea.
NEWS
July 5, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Russian authorities ordered a South Korean diplomat expelled Saturday after he was detained on suspicion of spying. The diplomat, identified as Cho Sung Woo, was taken into custody overnight as he met with an alleged Russian contact, according to the Federal Security Service, a successor to the Soviet-era KGB. The contact, an employee of Russia's Foreign Ministry, was also detained, the statement said, The Russian was accused of spying for South Korea.
NEWS
November 11, 1992 | Times Staff Writer
When Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin visits here next week, Moscow and Seoul will sign a historic memorandum, already approved by Pyongyang, to study the feasibility of a natural gas pipeline running through Communist North Korea and linking Siberia and South Korea, a source has told The Times. The source would not provide details but said the announcement of the study will be the centerpiece of Yeltsin's visit here Nov. 18-20, the first by a Moscow leader to the South Korean capital.
NEWS
February 3, 1997 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The scabbed stump of Chang Gi Chan's mangled arm is about all he has to show for a life cursed with colossal bad luck. Born under Japan's brutal colonial rule of his native Korea, Chang was wrenched from his wife and baby daughter in 1944 and shipped to the frigid wasteland of Sakhalin island off the coast of Siberia as a slave laborer for the Japanese Imperial Army.
NEWS
November 20, 1992 | SAM JAMESON and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With an apology for the past and promises of disarmament and business opportunities, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin told South Koreans on Thursday that Russia wants to become an active player in the economies and security of Asian-Pacific nations. The apology was for the downing of a Korean Air Lines jet with 269 people aboard, including 63 Americans, on a New York-Seoul flight in 1983.
NEWS
February 28, 2001 | From Reuters
The presidents of Russia and South Korea promised Tuesday to forge deeper ties, including plans to build a landmark railway link through North Korea that both leaders said could help bring peace to the divided Korean peninsula. Russian leader Vladimir V. Putin came to Seoul bearing Moscow's pledge of support for President Kim Dae Jung's efforts to thaw ties with the North. And he won Kim's backing for a key arms control treaty that the new U.S.
NEWS
November 16, 1992 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A three-day trip to Seoul beginning Wednesday by Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin is unlikely to produce much drama itself, but it will underscore new vistas that have opened up for South Korea that are affecting its relations with the United States. In 1990, South Korea, seeking Moscow's assistance to restrain its ally, Communist North Korea, was the supplicant when diplomatic relations between Moscow and Seoul were established.
NEWS
November 17, 1992
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin begins a delayed three-day official visit to South Korea Wednesday amid indications that his hosts are becoming more interested in wooing Beijing than Moscow. Long spurned by Communist governments in both China and the former Soviet Union, South Korea has established diplomatic relations with Beijing and Moscow in the last two years, as both its giant neighbors seek trade and investment to spur their economies.
NEWS
February 3, 1997 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The scabbed stump of Chang Gi Chan's mangled arm is about all he has to show for a life cursed with colossal bad luck. Born under Japan's brutal colonial rule of his native Korea, Chang was wrenched from his wife and baby daughter in 1944 and shipped to the frigid wasteland of Sakhalin island off the coast of Siberia as a slave laborer for the Japanese Imperial Army.
NEWS
August 20, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
South Korea demanded compensation from Russia for the shooting down of a Korean jetliner in Soviet airspace 10 years ago. It was the first time that Seoul has officially asked for payment for the Sept. 1, 1983, attack on the Korean Air Lines Boeing 747, which killed 269 people, including 62 Americans. The former Soviet Union claimed that it mistook the passenger plane for a U.S. spy aircraft.
NEWS
November 21, 1992 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin wound up his first visit to Asia on Friday by forging new military and economic agreements with South Korea, a former enemy, and pledging new actions against Communist North Korea, an old ally. After the defense ministers of South Korea and Russia signed an agreement for military exchanges, Yeltsin signed a declaration with President Roh Tae Woo that set the stage for widespread South Korean participation in Russian economic development.
NEWS
November 20, 1992 | SAM JAMESON and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With an apology for the past and promises of disarmament and business opportunities, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin told South Koreans on Thursday that Russia wants to become an active player in the economies and security of Asian-Pacific nations. The apology was for the downing of a Korean Air Lines jet with 269 people aboard, including 63 Americans, on a New York-Seoul flight in 1983.
NEWS
November 17, 1992
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin begins a delayed three-day official visit to South Korea Wednesday amid indications that his hosts are becoming more interested in wooing Beijing than Moscow. Long spurned by Communist governments in both China and the former Soviet Union, South Korea has established diplomatic relations with Beijing and Moscow in the last two years, as both its giant neighbors seek trade and investment to spur their economies.
NEWS
November 16, 1992 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A three-day trip to Seoul beginning Wednesday by Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin is unlikely to produce much drama itself, but it will underscore new vistas that have opened up for South Korea that are affecting its relations with the United States. In 1990, South Korea, seeking Moscow's assistance to restrain its ally, Communist North Korea, was the supplicant when diplomatic relations between Moscow and Seoul were established.
NEWS
November 21, 1992 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin wound up his first visit to Asia on Friday by forging new military and economic agreements with South Korea, a former enemy, and pledging new actions against Communist North Korea, an old ally. After the defense ministers of South Korea and Russia signed an agreement for military exchanges, Yeltsin signed a declaration with President Roh Tae Woo that set the stage for widespread South Korean participation in Russian economic development.
NEWS
November 11, 1992 | Times Staff Writer
When Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin visits here next week, Moscow and Seoul will sign a historic memorandum, already approved by Pyongyang, to study the feasibility of a natural gas pipeline running through Communist North Korea and linking Siberia and South Korea, a source has told The Times. The source would not provide details but said the announcement of the study will be the centerpiece of Yeltsin's visit here Nov. 18-20, the first by a Moscow leader to the South Korean capital.
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