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Russia Foreign Relations Tatarstan

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NEWS
February 18, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tatarstan, an oil-rich republic whose struggle for independence threatened to unravel Russia, has dropped its claim of sovereignty in exchange for a go-ahead from Moscow to manage and trade many of its own resources. The landmark compromise, published here Thursday, was hailed by leaders on both sides as a model for settling Moscow's unstable relations with the 88 constituent parts of the giant, ethnically diverse Russian Federation.
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NEWS
February 18, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tatarstan, an oil-rich republic whose struggle for independence threatened to unravel Russia, has dropped its claim of sovereignty in exchange for a go-ahead from Moscow to manage and trade many of its own resources. The landmark compromise, published here Thursday, was hailed by leaders on both sides as a model for settling Moscow's unstable relations with the 88 constituent parts of the giant, ethnically diverse Russian Federation.
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NEWS
March 23, 1992 | Times Wire Services
President Boris N. Yeltsin's top lieutenant appealed Sunday to the rebel region of Tatarstan to remain part of Russia after it voted in a referendum for self-rule. First Deputy Prime Minister Gennady E. Burbulis appealed to the oil-rich territory to sign an agreement shaping new relations between Moscow and a score of mini-republics within Russia. Yeltsin charged that Saturday's referendum was aimed at secession from the sprawling federation.
NEWS
March 23, 1992 | Times Wire Services
President Boris N. Yeltsin's top lieutenant appealed Sunday to the rebel region of Tatarstan to remain part of Russia after it voted in a referendum for self-rule. First Deputy Prime Minister Gennady E. Burbulis appealed to the oil-rich territory to sign an agreement shaping new relations between Moscow and a score of mini-republics within Russia. Yeltsin charged that Saturday's referendum was aimed at secession from the sprawling federation.
NEWS
March 22, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Openly defying Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin, residents of Tatarstan flocked to the polls Saturday for a referendum on self-rule that posed the most serious challenge yet to the unity of Yeltsin's sprawling Russian Federation. Mintimer Shaimiyev, president of the oil-rich region of 3.7 million people on the Volga River, insisted as he went to cast his ballot that Tatarstan was not seeking to secede from Russia.
NEWS
March 22, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Openly defying Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin, residents of Tatarstan flocked to the polls Saturday for a referendum on self-rule that posed the most serious challenge yet to the unity of Yeltsin's sprawling Russian Federation. Mintimer Shaimiyev, president of the oil-rich region of 3.7 million people on the Volga River, insisted as he went to cast his ballot that Tatarstan was not seeking to secede from Russia.
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