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NEWS
July 11, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the pealing of Kremlin bells and the fanfare of trumpets, Boris N. Yeltsin was inaugurated Wednesday as the first popularly elected leader Russia has ever known, assuming his hard-earned place as president of a vast republic that stretches from the Baltic Sea to the Pacific Ocean. "Great Russia is rising up from its knees," Yeltsin told a festive crowd that included Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev.
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NEWS
December 8, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With discontent in the Soviet army swelling ominously, President Mikhail S. Gorbachev fired its conservative chief of staff on Saturday and replaced him with a general known for his resistance to August's right-wing coup attempt. The outgoing chief of staff, Army Gen. Vladimir Lobov, had energetically promoted military reform since he was appointed in August, overseeing plans to trim the 4-million-strong armed forces and deploy them more defensively.
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NEWS
March 12, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian populist leader Boris N. Yeltsin on Monday encouraged leaders of the 12-day-old coal miner strike in their demand for the resignation of Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev. Yeltsin, president of the Russian Federation, the country's largest republic, told strike leaders that they are fully justified in their attempts to push the Kremlin into meeting their largely political demands and that they have the right to pick the methods to be used to safeguard their interests.
NEWS
November 29, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The readiness of the United States and its European allies to recognize Ukrainian independence brings to a halt any meaningful effort to reconstitute the Soviet Union as a single state, ending an era that shaped much of the 20th Century but providing no clear vision for the future.
NEWS
June 16, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A moderate reformer was elected the prime minister of the Soviet Union's Russian Republic on Friday after a radical proposed by Boris N. Yeltsin, the republic's populist president, was rejected. Ivan S. Silayev, 60, a Soviet deputy chairman in charge of the country's machine-tool and engineering industry, was elected with 163 votes from among the 239 deputies of the Russian Supreme Soviet, the republic's legislature, after Yeltsin withdrew his support from his own nominee in favor of Silayev.
NEWS
December 12, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Russian Federation, the largest of the Soviet Union's republics, agreed Tuesday to participate in drafting a new treaty binding the country together in a federal union, but it warned the central government that it would have to yield its almost total control of the economy.
NEWS
January 9, 1991 | Times Wire Services
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and Russian Federation leader Boris N. Yeltsin on Tuesday resolved a dispute over the 1991 budget that threatened to cripple the Soviet economy, Tass news agency said. Vitaly Ignatenko, Gorbachev's spokesman, said that the president and Yeltsin had ironed out differences over how much money the Russian Federation should contribute to the central budget, the independent Interfax news service reported.
NEWS
November 29, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The readiness of the United States and its European allies to recognize Ukrainian independence brings to a halt any meaningful effort to reconstitute the Soviet Union as a single state, ending an era that shaped much of the 20th Century but providing no clear vision for the future.
NEWS
June 15, 1990 | From the Baltimore Sun
Yegor K. Ligachev, the Politburo's conservative standard-bearer, directly attacked President Mikhail S. Gorbachev this week for making "concession after concession" and said his policies threaten to break up the Soviet Union. Ligachev's remarks, reported in the newspaper Izvestia on Thursday, are the first response from conservatives to the Soviet president's calm acceptance of the Russian republic's declaration of sovereignty.
NEWS
August 4, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Handing Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin another victory in his battle of wills with the Communist Party, a Politburo member announced Saturday that his comrades will obey Yeltsin's order to liquidate party cells in Russia's offices and factories effective today.
NEWS
November 26, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's efforts to bind together the remnants of the Soviet Union stalled when leaders of seven republics failed Monday to sign the treaty that would create a new political union and five other republics refused to send delegates to the meeting. The setback was one of the most serious Gorbachev has suffered since he began the tortuous negotiations on the draft treaty last spring.
NEWS
October 16, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin, seeking to propel the Soviet Union into full-scale economic reforms, declared Tuesday that his republic, the country's wealthiest, will stop financing central government ministries and state-owned enterprises it regards as unnecessary or uneconomic. Yeltsin also said that Russia, worried about the drain by other republics on its resources, will soon issue its own currency and pursue what increasingly is emerging as a "Russia first" policy.
NEWS
September 4, 1991 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin, whose republic contains most of the Soviet nuclear arsenal, called Tuesday for an international moratorium on underground weapons tests and pledged to pursue the "total elimination of nuclear weapons in Russia." Yeltsin, in his first detailed remarks on arms control since the collapse of the August coup, made clear that he intends to assume a key role in strategic decisions.
NEWS
August 4, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Handing Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin another victory in his battle of wills with the Communist Party, a Politburo member announced Saturday that his comrades will obey Yeltsin's order to liquidate party cells in Russia's offices and factories effective today.
NEWS
July 31, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As President Bush slept, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and Russian leader Boris N. Yeltsin huddled until 3 a.m. Tuesday for a summit of their own. It cleared away the last major dispute in their long, acrimonious fight over power-sharing, Russian officials said. "Today, there are no obstacles to Russia signing the Union Treaty," Pavel I.
NEWS
July 11, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the pealing of Kremlin bells and the fanfare of trumpets, Boris N. Yeltsin was inaugurated Wednesday as the first popularly elected leader Russia has ever known, assuming his hard-earned place as president of a vast republic that stretches from the Baltic Sea to the Pacific Ocean. "Great Russia is rising up from its knees," Yeltsin told a festive crowd that included Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev.
NEWS
May 21, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The conservative Russian Communist Party, faced with the almost unbeatable bid of the radical populist Boris N. Yeltsin to become president of the Soviet Union's largest republic, is hoping to spoil that victory by forcing him into a runoff and thus demonstrate that his support is not universal.
NEWS
November 26, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's efforts to bind together the remnants of the Soviet Union stalled when leaders of seven republics failed Monday to sign the treaty that would create a new political union and five other republics refused to send delegates to the meeting. The setback was one of the most serious Gorbachev has suffered since he began the tortuous negotiations on the draft treaty last spring.
NEWS
May 21, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The conservative Russian Communist Party, faced with the almost unbeatable bid of the radical populist Boris N. Yeltsin to become president of the Soviet Union's largest republic, is hoping to spoil that victory by forcing him into a runoff and thus demonstrate that his support is not universal.
NEWS
May 7, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Kremlin on Monday signed over control of Russia's coal mines to the Russian Federation in an attempt to end a crippling two-month strike and agreed to give the largest Soviet republic its own state security agency. The two moves signaled a watershed for the Russian Federation's leader, Boris N. Yeltsin, who has been pressing Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev to transfer to the republics authority over their own economic resources and political affairs.
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