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NEWS
August 1, 1999 | SCOTT GLOVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an incident that could strain relations between Kosovo's lame-duck rebel army and NATO-led peacekeepers here, the commander of the Kosovo Liberation Army was detained by Russian troops Saturday when he was unable to produce a special identification card that allows him to wear his uniform and sidearm in public, alliance officials said. Gen. Agim Ceku, the military leader of the KLA, was detained in Kijevo, west of Pristina, the provincial capital, said Canadian Maj.
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NEWS
June 18, 2001 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On his way home from his weekend summit with President Bush, Russian President Vladimir V. Putin toured Yugoslavia on Sunday--and paid a surprise visit to the province of Kosovo--in an effort to promote his national interests and polish his growing reputation as a statesman.
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NEWS
June 23, 1998 | Associated Press
Russian diplomats pressed Monday for an end to fighting in Kosovo, but shelling and gunfire resounded across the secessionist province, and there was no sign that talks between the warring sides were near. Serbian forces rained mortar shells onto ethnic Albanian villages in western Kosovo, and a Yugoslav army convoy bearing tanks and trucks full of soldiers rumbled in--the latest evidence of the army's apparently increasing role in putting down Kosovo's independence movement.
NEWS
October 1, 2000 | From Associated Press
Preparing to face down the opposition in the streets, Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic on Saturday turned down an offer of Russian mediation, a U.S. official said. The defiant Milosevic declared that Yugoslavs themselves "will decide our fate." Milosevic spoke as the opposition unveiled plans for what they hope will be nationwide work stoppages and blockades to force the Yugoslav president to accept defeat by challenger Vojislav Kostunica in the Sept. 24 elections.
NEWS
October 1, 2000 | From Associated Press
Preparing to face down the opposition in the streets, Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic on Saturday turned down an offer of Russian mediation, a U.S. official said. The defiant Milosevic declared that Yugoslavs themselves "will decide our fate." Milosevic spoke as the opposition unveiled plans for what they hope will be nationwide work stoppages and blockades to force the Yugoslav president to accept defeat by challenger Vojislav Kostunica in the Sept. 24 elections.
NEWS
June 15, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a contingent of Russian troops rolled into Kosovo over the weekend, the audacious maneuver capped a three-month campaign by Russia to maintain its place on the world stage in the face of NATO's growing power. First by mounting vitriolic protests against NATO's bombing of Yugoslavia, then by launching a diplomatic effort to mediate the conflict and finally by sending in troops, Russia has demonstrated that it wants to be a player--no matter how sick its economy and its president.
NEWS
May 16, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON and MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Among the dignitaries who stood watching Russia's Victory Day parade last week was a wanted man: a top Yugoslav official indicted on war crimes charges, Defense Minister Dragoljub Ojdanic. Though Russia is obliged to arrest those indicted for war crimes, Ojdanic visited Moscow from May 7-12, attended the parade, met with acting Defense Minister Igor D. Sergeyev and other Russian military officials, and flew out without anyone laying a finger on him.
NEWS
May 4, 1999 | EDWIN CHEN RICHARD BOUDREAUX and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Despite a round of vigorous diplomacy mediated by a senior Russian envoy, President Clinton declared Monday that NATO intends to maintain its bombardment of Yugoslavia until President Slobodan Milosevic meets alliance demands on Kosovo.
NEWS
June 20, 1999 | TYLER MARSHALL and MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Within hours of an agreement between Russia and the United States on the shape of the international peacekeeping force for Kosovo, President Clinton and Russian Premier Sergei V. Stepashin worked Saturday to ease the chill that has characterized their countries' relations for much of the past two years. National Security Advisor Samuel R.
NEWS
June 16, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia may have stunned the West by moving troops into Kosovo ahead of NATO, but it became apparent Tuesday that Moscow gave little thought to how it would sustain its island of 200 soldiers in a sea of NATO troops. Russian news services reported Tuesday that the paratroopers holding the airport outside Pristina, Kosovo's capital, were running low on food and fuel only four days into their standoff. Even worse, the soldiers had already run out of cigarettes.
NEWS
May 16, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON and MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Among the dignitaries who stood watching Russia's Victory Day parade last week was a wanted man: a top Yugoslav official indicted on war crimes charges, Defense Minister Dragoljub Ojdanic. Though Russia is obliged to arrest those indicted for war crimes, Ojdanic visited Moscow from May 7-12, attended the parade, met with acting Defense Minister Igor D. Sergeyev and other Russian military officials, and flew out without anyone laying a finger on him.
NEWS
August 1, 1999 | SCOTT GLOVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an incident that could strain relations between Kosovo's lame-duck rebel army and NATO-led peacekeepers here, the commander of the Kosovo Liberation Army was detained by Russian troops Saturday when he was unable to produce a special identification card that allows him to wear his uniform and sidearm in public, alliance officials said. Gen. Agim Ceku, the military leader of the KLA, was detained in Kijevo, west of Pristina, the provincial capital, said Canadian Maj.
NEWS
June 20, 1999 | TYLER MARSHALL and MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Within hours of an agreement between Russia and the United States on the shape of the international peacekeeping force for Kosovo, President Clinton and Russian Premier Sergei V. Stepashin worked Saturday to ease the chill that has characterized their countries' relations for much of the past two years. National Security Advisor Samuel R.
NEWS
June 16, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia may have stunned the West by moving troops into Kosovo ahead of NATO, but it became apparent Tuesday that Moscow gave little thought to how it would sustain its island of 200 soldiers in a sea of NATO troops. Russian news services reported Tuesday that the paratroopers holding the airport outside Pristina, Kosovo's capital, were running low on food and fuel only four days into their standoff. Even worse, the soldiers had already run out of cigarettes.
NEWS
June 15, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a contingent of Russian troops rolled into Kosovo over the weekend, the audacious maneuver capped a three-month campaign by Russia to maintain its place on the world stage in the face of NATO's growing power. First by mounting vitriolic protests against NATO's bombing of Yugoslavia, then by launching a diplomatic effort to mediate the conflict and finally by sending in troops, Russia has demonstrated that it wants to be a player--no matter how sick its economy and its president.
NEWS
May 30, 1999 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Washington wanted to restart the Cold War, it might consider the following strategy: First, provoke a conflict within Russia's sphere of influence that would show the former superpower to be militarily and politically impotent. Second, placate the Russians' sense of injury by suggesting they make themselves useful through diplomacy. Third, pull the carpet out from under that diplomacy. The result: a Russia isolated, powerless and angry.
NEWS
December 15, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a speech he later termed "a wake-up call," Russian Foreign Minister Andrei V. Kozyrev shocked European foreign ministers Monday with a Cold War-era diatribe, threatening to force former Soviet republics to join a Russian-dominated federation and demanding an end to Western interference in Yugoslavia. But half an hour later, Kozyrev returned to the rostrum of the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe to recant the speech.
NEWS
March 25, 1999 | PAUL WATSON and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Months of frustrating negotiation came to a fiery end Wednesday as NATO bombs and missiles shook the night in this provincial capital, marking the first time in NATO's 50-year history that the alliance directed its military might at a sovereign nation. The U.S.-led attacks were harshly criticized by Russia and questioned even by some NATO diplomats. They were launched after negotiations failed to halt a bloody campaign by Serbian forces against ethnic Albanians in the Serbian province of Kosovo.
NEWS
May 4, 1999 | EDWIN CHEN RICHARD BOUDREAUX and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Despite a round of vigorous diplomacy mediated by a senior Russian envoy, President Clinton declared Monday that NATO intends to maintain its bombardment of Yugoslavia until President Slobodan Milosevic meets alliance demands on Kosovo.
NEWS
May 3, 1999 | MAURA REYNOLDS and DOYLE McMANUS and RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For more than two weeks, the Russians have been conducting their own Kosovo offensive--a diplomatic one. So far, they appear to have little to show for it: Yugoslavia and NATO look no closer to peace than they did a month ago. But in the rarefied world of diplomacy, progress does not have to be obvious to be significant. Today, Russian envoy Viktor S. Chernomyrdin will take his peace campaign to Washington, where he is scheduled to meet with President Clinton.
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