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NEWS
March 19, 1999 | Associated Press
In Russia's latest scandal, a brief video apparently showing the prosecutor general having sex with two prostitutes aired on state television Thursday after President Boris N. Yeltsin ordered lawmakers to fire the man and they refused. The broadcast presumably aimed to force the prosecutor to bend to the Russian leader's order and leave office. But support for the embattled prosecutor, Yuri I. Skuratov, only seems to be growing, pushing Yeltsin into yet another confrontation with parliament.
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NEWS
June 1, 2001 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian scientists have been ordered to report all professional contacts with foreigners in a move apparently aimed at reimposing Soviet-style controls on science, a prominent human rights campaigner said Thursday.
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NEWS
December 15, 1999 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Kremlin's war against its political enemies hit the streets of Moscow on Tuesday, with dueling protest rallies in which the opposing camps accused each other of bad faith and dirty politics in advance of national elections Sunday. The larger of the two demonstrations took place along the Kremlin walls, where Moscow Mayor Yuri M. Luzhkov charged the politicians inside with trying to silence his growing centrist movement, which calls for greater state guidance of the economy.
NEWS
May 11, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the mess of wires inside one of Russia's military space relay stations, a small cable short-circuited Thursday--and the country lost control of four military satellites. A blaze at the Russian Space Forces unit in Kurilovo, 120 miles southwest of Moscow, knocked out communication with the satellites for part of the day--a new reminder of the nation's dangerously decrepit military infrastructure.
NEWS
October 5, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Following Moscow's bloodiest political battle since the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917, the leaders of a 13-day parliamentary rebellion surrendered Monday after tanks punched holes in the Russian White House and left it aflame. As the Parliament building burned, hundreds of "White House defenders" streamed out of the blackened marble fortress with their hands on their heads. Soldiers loyal to President Boris N.
NEWS
September 16, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Russia's new government proposed printing money to pay wages that are overdue, but no decision on increasing the money supply will be made until the Central Bank's new board of directors is in place, Chairman Viktor V. Gerashchenko said. The board is scheduled for a confirmation vote in parliament today. Meanwhile, the head of the centrist Our Home Is Russia party, Alexander N. Shokhin, was named deputy prime minister in charge of financial issues.
BUSINESS
August 31, 1999 | JEFF LEEDS and MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Deutsche Bank and other international financial institutions have reported to U.S. authorities on suspicious account activity that could be linked to possible money laundering by Russian organized crime figures through Bank of New York Co., sources said Monday. Filing the reports to the Treasury Department's Financial Crimes Enforcement Network suggests a widening of the federal inquiry into other so-called correspondent banks, which process transactions for other banks in foreign markets.
NEWS
May 4, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Denouncing Moscow's May Day violence as "frightening," President Boris N. Yeltsin on Monday vowed to take "urgent measures" that will ultimately strip his foes of their power bases in Russia's government. Yeltsin, in his first appearance in public since Communist and nationalist protesters battled with police in the streets here Saturday, said it is time to capitalize on the mandate he won in a nationwide referendum last month.
NEWS
October 6, 1999 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal prosecutors on Tuesday announced the first indictment to arise out of an international probe of alleged money laundering at the Bank of New York, charging a former bank executive and two businessmen with illegally transferring about $7 billion over the last three years. Filed under seal Sept. 16 in U.S.
NEWS
August 24, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For all you heirs of dispossessed Russian counts out there, wondering if you might someday get the old family estate back, the Justice Ministry sent a clear signal Tuesday: Don't hold your breath. The Kremlin had announced new procedures Monday for returning or paying for "illegally confiscated property," raising the prospect that Russia might go the way of much of Eastern Europe, giving back castles and farms to their pre-Soviet owners. But Deputy Justice Minister Anatoly M.
NEWS
April 4, 2001 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The standoff between the Kremlin and Russia's only independent national television network reached a crisis point Tuesday when creditors tried to seize control of the network by replacing its top executives with Kremlin loyalists--one of them an American banker. The action, which took place at a shareholders meeting of questionable legality, was perhaps the decisive strike against NTV, whose pugnacious programming has deeply irritated the Kremlin.
NEWS
March 5, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It sounded innocent enough: A young historian specializing in arms control issues is hired to summarize and analyze articles from the Russian press for a group of business consultants in London.
NEWS
February 5, 2001 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian and U.S. security officials sparred Sunday over Bush administration plans for a national missile defense and Kremlin threats against domestic opponents, prompting warnings that the erstwhile superpower rivals are headed for a new Cold War. Although delegates to the annual Munich Conference on Security Policy took note of the vast improvements in international relations since the end of totalitarian rule in Moscow, there were expressions of "profound concern" over the direction of U.S.
BUSINESS
January 12, 2001 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ted Turner has been many things--media visionary, multibillionaire magnate, self-appointed rescuer of the United Nations and ambassador for his own private foreign policy. Now he's considering adding "defender of Russian press freedom" to his resume. It might just turn out to be his hardest gig.
NEWS
December 21, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Russia's upper house of parliament overwhelmingly approved a law adopting the melody of the Soviet anthem as Russia's national song. The Federation Council passed the law with 144 votes in favor, one against and two abstentions, according to the council's press service. The law had already passed the Duma, or lower house of parliament, on Dec. 8. It will now be sent to President Vladimir V. Putin for signing before the new year.
NEWS
December 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
Russia's most visible KGB veteran, President Vladimir V. Putin, on Wednesday urged former colleagues to learn from the repressive past of Soviet-era secret services and to apply their skills toward defending democracy. Putin's speech in the Kremlin, followed by a concert and dinner, was timed to mark Chekist's Day, a Soviet-era holiday commemorating the Dec. 20, 1917, establishment of the secret police, the Cheka.
NEWS
February 9, 1998 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Downstairs, scruffy musicians are picking up violins to start their daily rehearsal. Upstairs, the Moscow State Symphony Orchestra's general manager, Alexander Krauter, is picking up the phone to start his daily battle--to extract money from unwilling government officials to keep the orchestra going. "If we don't get financing, the orchestra will have to close in three months," he says sadly.
NEWS
December 9, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin and the leaders of Ukraine and Belarus on Sunday declared the Soviet Union dead and established a new "commonwealth of independent states" with the capital in Minsk, capital of Belarus, rather than Moscow. "We, the Republic of Belarus, the Russian Federation and Ukraine, as the founding states of the U.S.S.R. and co-signatories of the 1922 Union Treaty . . . state that the U.S.S.R.
NEWS
December 13, 2000 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spanish police seized fugitive Russian media mogul Vladimir A. Gusinsky on Tuesday at his villa in the southern province of Cadiz, but Gusinsky's lawyers immediately argued that he is a victim of Kremlin political machinations and should not be extradited to Moscow. Gusinsky--who has controlled Russia's only independent television station, NTV--fled Russia after being briefly jailed in June.
NEWS
December 9, 2000 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian lawmakers scrapped the country's post-Soviet national anthem Friday and voted to reinstate the melody of its Communist-era anthem instead--a gesture proponents called a step toward social reconciliation and critics denounced as a move toward repression. President Vladimir V. Putin proposed the switch in an address to the nation this week, saying that restoring the rousing "Unbreakable Union" anthem composed under dictator Josef Stalin could help reunite his fractured society.
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