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NEWS
March 4, 1998 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin on Tuesday merged three military security agencies under a new chief known for advocating military reform and, thus, apparently ended a minor Cabinet reshuffle with the suggestion that Russia may now move on its long-delayed aim of streamlining the huge ex-Soviet army. Yeltsin named Andrei A. Kokoshin, former chief of the Defense Council and State Military Inspectorate, as new secretary of the Russian Security Council.
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NEWS
January 12, 2000 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Top officials of Russia's secret police, known these days as the FSB, gathered last month to celebrate the founding of their agency in 1917 by Communist leader V.I. Lenin. Vladimir V. Putin, an ex-KGB colonel who had become prime minister only months earlier, spoke to his compatriots and reported with a smile: "A group of FSB colleagues dispatched to work undercover in the government has successfully completed its first mission."
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NEWS
March 5, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To prevent nuclear accidents like the 1986 Chernobyl power plant catastrophe, the Russian government has created a watchdog committee to oversee the country's vast civilian and military nuclear facilities and the disposal of radioactive wastes, officials said Wednesday. The announcement came even as Russian news agencies reported that a fire, caused by a short circuit, had prompted the early Wednesday shutdown of the Balakov nuclear power plant near Russia's border with Kazakhstan.
NEWS
March 4, 1998 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin on Tuesday merged three military security agencies under a new chief known for advocating military reform and, thus, apparently ended a minor Cabinet reshuffle with the suggestion that Russia may now move on its long-delayed aim of streamlining the huge ex-Soviet army. Yeltsin named Andrei A. Kokoshin, former chief of the Defense Council and State Military Inspectorate, as new secretary of the Russian Security Council.
BUSINESS
July 22, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vowing to end Russia's unchecked video and audio piracy, a new government agency charged with defending copyrights announced its birth on Tuesday and pledged to ensure that proper royalties are paid from now on. "At issue is piracy on a colossal scale, in both video and sound recordings, and even in publishing recently," said Mikhail Fedotov, director of the new Russian Intellectual Property Agency. "This is what our agency intends to fight."
NEWS
April 22, 1997 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Life in the New Russia is hard on Yelena Vorsina. Her monthly salary--the equivalent of $122--is three months overdue, and last payday she received only $40. Adding to her misery, she must cough up 12% of her meager income in taxes. She and her co-workers threatened to strike but realized they would be severely punished. Instead, she planted vegetables to feed her family. "It is impossible to live, but what can you do?" asked the 35-year-old mother of two.
NEWS
December 29, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chief of Russia's secret police has criticized a presidential order to transform his ministry, the former KGB, into a new counterintelligence agency, calling it demoralizing and potentially damaging to national security. "You surely know the popular expression 'If you want to weaken performance, start a reorganization.' In this case, that is what's happening," said Nikolai M. Golushko, the man put in charge of the abrupt task by President Boris N. Yeltsin.
NEWS
December 27, 1992 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin, bolstering his position against foes of free-market reform, created his own propaganda agency Saturday to oversee state-owned news media and named a controversial reformer to head it. Yeltsin acted by decree five days after the conservative Supreme Soviet passed a law abolishing his power to form new agencies without its consent and a day after it adjourned for the year.
NEWS
December 20, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin, moving swiftly Thursday to bring Soviet rule to an end, issued decrees abolishing the Soviet Foreign and Interior ministries and taking over the Kremlin and most other central government agencies on Russian territory. So sweeping were Yeltsin's decrees--dramatic moves to consolidate his power--that apparently only two Soviet ministries, Defense and Nuclear Energy, still remain independent of his Russian Federation government.
NEWS
August 28, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The heirs of KGB counterintelligence said Thursday they had practically covered their entire annual budget by foiling large-scale criminal schemes to spirit metals, petroleum, timber and other strategic resources out of Russia to the West. An official of the Security Ministry called the ministry's most successful operation yet a "graphic example" of how a successor agency to the KGB, still regarded warily by many citizens, can help secure a prosperous, law-abiding Russia.
NEWS
April 22, 1997 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Life in the New Russia is hard on Yelena Vorsina. Her monthly salary--the equivalent of $122--is three months overdue, and last payday she received only $40. Adding to her misery, she must cough up 12% of her meager income in taxes. She and her co-workers threatened to strike but realized they would be severely punished. Instead, she planted vegetables to feed her family. "It is impossible to live, but what can you do?" asked the 35-year-old mother of two.
NEWS
December 29, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chief of Russia's secret police has criticized a presidential order to transform his ministry, the former KGB, into a new counterintelligence agency, calling it demoralizing and potentially damaging to national security. "You surely know the popular expression 'If you want to weaken performance, start a reorganization.' In this case, that is what's happening," said Nikolai M. Golushko, the man put in charge of the abrupt task by President Boris N. Yeltsin.
NEWS
December 22, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin, lashing out at the intelligence agency that appears to have failed him repeatedly in recent weeks, denounced the Russian Security Ministry as "unreformable" on Tuesday and abolished it. In its place, he created a new Federal Counterintelligence Agency to function under the same chief, Nikolai Golushko, but meant to break decisively with Russia's long line of secret police structures.
NEWS
December 27, 1992 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin, bolstering his position against foes of free-market reform, created his own propaganda agency Saturday to oversee state-owned news media and named a controversial reformer to head it. Yeltsin acted by decree five days after the conservative Supreme Soviet passed a law abolishing his power to form new agencies without its consent and a day after it adjourned for the year.
NEWS
August 28, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The heirs of KGB counterintelligence said Thursday they had practically covered their entire annual budget by foiling large-scale criminal schemes to spirit metals, petroleum, timber and other strategic resources out of Russia to the West. An official of the Security Ministry called the ministry's most successful operation yet a "graphic example" of how a successor agency to the KGB, still regarded warily by many citizens, can help secure a prosperous, law-abiding Russia.
BUSINESS
July 22, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vowing to end Russia's unchecked video and audio piracy, a new government agency charged with defending copyrights announced its birth on Tuesday and pledged to ensure that proper royalties are paid from now on. "At issue is piracy on a colossal scale, in both video and sound recordings, and even in publishing recently," said Mikhail Fedotov, director of the new Russian Intellectual Property Agency. "This is what our agency intends to fight."
NEWS
December 22, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin, lashing out at the intelligence agency that appears to have failed him repeatedly in recent weeks, denounced the Russian Security Ministry as "unreformable" on Tuesday and abolished it. In its place, he created a new Federal Counterintelligence Agency to function under the same chief, Nikolai Golushko, but meant to break decisively with Russia's long line of secret police structures.
NEWS
January 12, 2000 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Top officials of Russia's secret police, known these days as the FSB, gathered last month to celebrate the founding of their agency in 1917 by Communist leader V.I. Lenin. Vladimir V. Putin, an ex-KGB colonel who had become prime minister only months earlier, spoke to his compatriots and reported with a smile: "A group of FSB colleagues dispatched to work undercover in the government has successfully completed its first mission."
NEWS
March 5, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To prevent nuclear accidents like the 1986 Chernobyl power plant catastrophe, the Russian government has created a watchdog committee to oversee the country's vast civilian and military nuclear facilities and the disposal of radioactive wastes, officials said Wednesday. The announcement came even as Russian news agencies reported that a fire, caused by a short circuit, had prompted the early Wednesday shutdown of the Balakov nuclear power plant near Russia's border with Kazakhstan.
NEWS
December 20, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin, moving swiftly Thursday to bring Soviet rule to an end, issued decrees abolishing the Soviet Foreign and Interior ministries and taking over the Kremlin and most other central government agencies on Russian territory. So sweeping were Yeltsin's decrees--dramatic moves to consolidate his power--that apparently only two Soviet ministries, Defense and Nuclear Energy, still remain independent of his Russian Federation government.
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