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NEWS
September 13, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin flexed his expanding political muscle on Thursday by taking over control of his vast republic's government and nationalizing all energy facilities on Russian territory. With his decree making the Russian Council of Ministers subordinate to the presidency, Yeltsin put into law the broad powers conferred on him by the crumbling Soviet leadership since he defied a Communist coup attempt and spared the country another era of hard-line rule.
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NEWS
December 27, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As if there were any doubts, the Soviet legislature, a pathetic parody of its former self, solemnly voted the Soviet Union out of existence on Thursday and ordered the remaining shreds of Kremlin power scrapped within a week. "As you noticed today, the flag of the Soviet Union over the Kremlin has been lowered," Kazakh writer Anuarbek Alimzhanov, chairman of the legislature's upper chamber, the Council of the Republics, told the 40 or so deputies who bothered to show up.
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NEWS
August 22, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Hurrah! Hurrah! Hurrah!" Crowing their triumph in voices ragged from fatigue, applauding and raising their fists high, the tens of thousands of Muscovites who had shielded the Russian Federation government building with their bodies over two long, tense nights declared their victory Wednesday evening with roars of joy. Konstantin I.
NEWS
September 13, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin flexed his expanding political muscle on Thursday by taking over control of his vast republic's government and nationalizing all energy facilities on Russian territory. With his decree making the Russian Council of Ministers subordinate to the presidency, Yeltsin put into law the broad powers conferred on him by the crumbling Soviet leadership since he defied a Communist coup attempt and spared the country another era of hard-line rule.
NEWS
December 27, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As if there were any doubts, the Soviet legislature, a pathetic parody of its former self, solemnly voted the Soviet Union out of existence on Thursday and ordered the remaining shreds of Kremlin power scrapped within a week. "As you noticed today, the flag of the Soviet Union over the Kremlin has been lowered," Kazakh writer Anuarbek Alimzhanov, chairman of the legislature's upper chamber, the Council of the Republics, told the 40 or so deputies who bothered to show up.
NEWS
August 22, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Awakened before dawn Monday morning and ordered to get his men into tanks and head toward the Soviet capital, Lt. Nikolai Kotlerov had no idea he was being sent to enforce a reactionary coup d'etat. "When we got to Moscow, people walked up to us and asked, 'You're not going to shoot, are you?' " recalled Kotlerov, the platoon commander from the elite Tamanskaya Tank Division. "It was shocking to us," he said, "because of course we didn't plan to shoot our own people.
WORLD
November 2, 2009 | Megan K. Stack
When Russian businessman Yevgeny Ostrovsky decided to name his kebab joint Anti-Soviet Shashlik, he thought of it as black humor. It was a little tongue-in-cheek, a little retro, a little nod to the old-timers who still remembered when the meat grill, across the street from the famed Sovietsky hotel, was known by just that nickname. But it was also, in that ambiguous, extrajudicial way so common in today's Russia, a little bit illegal. Three applications for an "anti-Soviet" sign were rejected by the city without explanation.
NEWS
August 22, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Hurrah! Hurrah! Hurrah!" Crowing their triumph in voices ragged from fatigue, applauding and raising their fists high, the tens of thousands of Muscovites who had shielded the Russian Federation government building with their bodies over two long, tense nights declared their victory Wednesday evening with roars of joy. Konstantin I.
NEWS
August 22, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Awakened before dawn Monday morning and ordered to get his men into tanks and head toward the Soviet capital, Lt. Nikolai Kotlerov had no idea he was being sent to enforce a reactionary coup d'etat. "When we got to Moscow, people walked up to us and asked, 'You're not going to shoot, are you?' " recalled Kotlerov, the platoon commander from the elite Tamanskaya Tank Division. "It was shocking to us," he said, "because of course we didn't plan to shoot our own people.
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