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NEWS
March 19, 1999 | Associated Press
In Russia's latest scandal, a brief video apparently showing the prosecutor general having sex with two prostitutes aired on state television Thursday after President Boris N. Yeltsin ordered lawmakers to fire the man and they refused. The broadcast presumably aimed to force the prosecutor to bend to the Russian leader's order and leave office. But support for the embattled prosecutor, Yuri I. Skuratov, only seems to be growing, pushing Yeltsin into yet another confrontation with parliament.
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NEWS
March 12, 2002 | DAVID WILLMAN and ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two years ago, a small Pennsylvania consulting firm was quietly hired by another American company responsible for carrying out a sensitive nuclear security agreement between the United States and Russia. As it turns out, one of the Pennsylvania firm's owners was Yevgeny O. Adamov, who then also headed the Russian Ministry of Atomic Energy. At the time, Adamov's ministry was overseeing multimillion-dollar negotiations between Russia and USEC Inc.
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NEWS
July 19, 1996 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the Mormons first came to the Russian capital about five years ago, city authorities gave the preachers from Utah what seemed an appropriate place to hold their prayer meetings: rooms in a ramshackle former Russian Orthodox monastery, closed decades before by the Soviet government. But as the strictures of communism fell away in the aftermath of the Soviet collapse, Russians were again permitted freedom of worship and, in 1993, President Boris N.
NEWS
December 25, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russians across 11 time zones stood for hours Monday in temperatures as low as minus 20, hopping from foot to foot to keep warm, waiting for the chance to put a question to the president, Vladimir V. Putin. What came through in more than two hours of conversation broadcast on live TV was a howl of discontent from the provinces, as people complained how hard it is to survive on meager pensions and state salaries.
NEWS
March 7, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a live international Internet interview, Russian President Vladimir V. Putin's voice, often distorted or broken up, sounded like something from the era of early radio, not the latest that computer technology has to offer. But with questions from Murmansk in far northern Russia, San Diego and Canberra, Australia, Putin's Internet forum Tuesday was unusual for a Kremlin leader who normally only gives news conferences to a few handpicked journalists.
NEWS
May 8, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Professing to ignore "filth" slung at him by President Boris N. Yeltsin, Vice President Alexander V. Rutskoi, an ally-turned-opponent, said Friday he will run for the Russian presidency against his estranged boss if given the chance. On Thursday, Yeltsin told the nation he has completely lost trust in Rutskoi, a former fighter pilot who was his running mate in 1991. On Friday, the gruff, mustachioed Rutskoi, 45, told reporters: "Time will show who is right--the president of Russia or myself.
NEWS
May 7, 2000 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Where in the world is Ludmila Putin? Since Vladimir V. Putin became Russia's acting president on New Year's Eve, his wife has barely been seen and never heard. She has appeared in public less than half a dozen times--and then only briefly. Not once has she uttered a word. "I have absolutely no impression of her at all because I've never seen her at all," said Yulia Nazarova, 30, a part-time seamstress. "Maybe that's the way it should be."
NEWS
July 11, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the pealing of Kremlin bells and the fanfare of trumpets, Boris N. Yeltsin was inaugurated Wednesday as the first popularly elected leader Russia has ever known, assuming his hard-earned place as president of a vast republic that stretches from the Baltic Sea to the Pacific Ocean. "Great Russia is rising up from its knees," Yeltsin told a festive crowd that included Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev.
NEWS
May 13, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK and MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Pushing Russia to the brink of a new political crisis, President Boris N. Yeltsin fired popular Prime Minister Yevgeny M. Primakov on Wednesday and named the nation's top police official, Sergei V. Stepashin, to head a new government. Yeltsin, raising the stakes in his long-running battle with the Communist-dominated lower house of parliament, dismissed Primakov in an apparent bid to outmaneuver lawmakers as they decide this week whether to impeach the president.
NEWS
March 16, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two Russian diplomats flew home from Norway on Sunday after they were expelled for allegedly trying to buy Norwegian government secrets and spying on the North Atlantic Treaty Organization member. In a holdover from the Cold War era, a Norwegian official disclosed last week that he had worked as a double agent since 1994, feeding the Russians false documents and information after they tried to recruit him as a spy.
NEWS
June 13, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are moments, speeding around the world's biggest country in his motorcade, that Vladimir V. Putin secretly yearns to stop the clock and drop into a bar for a beer. But his entourage is huge and a lot of other people would be kept waiting. No, an impromptu beer for the president of Russia is just not practical. Putin's rigid self-discipline rules out the kind of spontaneous gestures that marked the tenure of his predecessor, Boris N. Yeltsin.
NEWS
May 11, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
President Vladimir V. Putin named ex-Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin as ambassador to Ukraine in a surprise move signaling an upgrading of ties with a key ex-Soviet republic. Chernomyrdin headed Russia's natural gas monopoly Gazprom before serving as President Boris N. Yeltsin's premier from 1992 to 1998. His appointment may reflect Moscow's determination to recoup Ukraine's natural gas debts, estimated at $1.4 billion to $2 billion.
NEWS
April 5, 2001 | MAURA REYNOLDS and SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Americans lined up on both sides of the fight over media freedom in Russia on Wednesday, with Ted Turner confirming an offer to buy a significant stake in the maverick NTV network, while a Los Angeles investment firm acknowledged playing a critical role in giving majority control to Kremlin loyalists. The decisions mean that the fate of NTV, whose exposes and critical war reporting have irked Russian President Vladimir V.
NEWS
March 22, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT and ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Secretary of State Colin L. Powell on Wednesday ordered 50 Russian diplomats to leave the United States--six of them immediately--partly in response to the spy case involving former FBI agent Robert Philip Hanssen, U.S. officials said.
NEWS
March 17, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Attorneys again asked a federal judge in New York to release on bail a Russian official whom Switzerland accuses of laundering huge kickbacks from Swiss companies that renovated Kremlin buildings. A defense attorney argued that Pavel P. Borodin cannot fully perform his duties as secretary of the Russia-Belarus Union while jailed. Borodin, 54, a former top aide to former Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin, is wanted in Switzerland. He was arrested Jan.
NEWS
March 15, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A gunman opened fire on the car carrying a Russian lawmaker in central Moscow, injuring him and killing his driver, police said. Bashir Kodzoyev, a member of the pro-Kremlin Unity Party, was wounded in the chest and arm. Party officials said Kodzoyev, a deputy in the Duma, the lower house of parliament, was hospitalized in satisfactory condition. Police said the unidentified gunman opened fire on Kodzoyev's passing car from the third floor of a building and then fled.
NEWS
March 19, 2000 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was 1976, and Vladimir V. Putin was living a lie. He had recently graduated from law school and was working for the KGB when he bumped into two high school classmates, Sergei and Yelena Kudrov. Putin told them that he had just won a car in a government lottery and was working at the local prosecutor's office, the Kudrovs recalled. He ducked questions about his job by joking: "Before lunch, we're busy catching criminals. After lunch, we're busy shooting them."
NEWS
October 13, 1992 | VIKTOR GREBENSHIKOV, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While the Russian Constitutional Court ponders whether the ban on the Soviet Communist Party should be permanent, some faithful, rank-and-file Communists pledged Monday to carry on regardless of the verdict. "Communism is an ideology, which is indestructible, as history shows," said Alexei A. Prigarin, an organizer of a group trying to revive the Communist Party of the Soviet Union. "The dream of social justice will always fire up people under any regimes."
NEWS
March 7, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a live international Internet interview, Russian President Vladimir V. Putin's voice, often distorted or broken up, sounded like something from the era of early radio, not the latest that computer technology has to offer. But with questions from Murmansk in far northern Russia, San Diego and Canberra, Australia, Putin's Internet forum Tuesday was unusual for a Kremlin leader who normally only gives news conferences to a few handpicked journalists.
NEWS
March 3, 2001 | Reuters
Russian and foreign dignitaries paid tribute Friday to former Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, marking his 70th birthday with flair in a country where most people dismiss the legacy of his reforms. Russian President Vladimir V. Putin and even his predecessor, Boris N. Yeltsin--Gorbachev's bitter rival even after the 1991 collapse of communism--led the congratulations for the architect of perestroika, whose reforms opened up Soviet society.
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