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November 1, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since Boris N. Yeltsin was rushed to the hospital last week with a new bout of heart disease, Russia has been gripped by speculation that its unpopular president is near death and that his post-Soviet reforms may be swept away in an imminent--and possibly bloody--change of leadership. Naina I. Yeltsin endured all that silently, with pain in her own heart--until Tuesday.
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NEWS
October 11, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
President Boris N. Yeltsin received hospital treatment for the flu, and his temperature was returning to normal, the Kremlin said. Spokesman Dmitri D. Yakushkin did not provide details on the treatment or say when the president, who was hospitalized Saturday, might be released, according to the Interfax news agency. Yeltsin met with his chief of staff, Alexander S. Voloshin, at the hospital, Yakushkin said. The president did not give any additional powers to Prime Minister Vladimir V.
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NEWS
November 5, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russians collectively held their breath today as President Boris N. Yeltsin handed control of this stumbling superpower to his prime minister, then slipped into the nether world of anesthesia for a heart bypass operation on which the fate of the nation rested. The surgery began before dawn, just an hour after a black limousine flying the Russian colors and presumably carrying Yeltsin had rushed out of the Barvikha sanatorium in a convoy of government vehicles. U.S. heart surgery pioneer Dr.
NEWS
May 14, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The television cameras were rolling. The Kremlin court was assembled. President Boris N. Yeltsin sat at the head of the table. To his right was Patriarch Alexi II, head of the Russian Orthodox Church; to his left was the soon-to-be-former prime minister, Yevgeny M. Primakov. Yeltsin began to speak, then paused. Something was wrong. His new first deputy prime minister, Sergei V. Stepashin, was across the room--not in his proper place next to Primakov. Yeltsin glowered at his ministers.
NEWS
January 18, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin, whose poor health has left Russia without strong leadership for more than two years, was hospitalized again Sunday with what the Kremlin said was a bleeding stomach ulcer. The Kremlin said Yeltsin, 67, would be confined to bed for an indefinite period but was in stable condition and would not transfer any of his constitutional powers to Prime Minister Yevgeny M. Primakov. "The president feels fine," Primakov told the Itar-Tass news service.
NEWS
January 19, 1999 | From Associated Press
President Boris N. Yeltsin has made so many trips to the hospital in the past few years that his latest illness, a bleeding ulcer, provoked no panic in Russia. In fact, it barely raised eyebrows. "The less Yeltsin interferes, the faster Russia's [economic] recovery will be," Communist Party leader Gennady A. Zyuganov said Monday, a day after the president was admitted to Moscow's Central Clinical Hospital.
NEWS
January 31, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin was moved to a health resort outside Moscow after two weeks of hospital treatment for a stomach ulcer, the Kremlin press service said. As if to emphasize that he is still in charge in spite of his ailment, Yeltsin reportedly signed a decree to reduce the size of his administration. Presidential spokesman Dmitri D. Yakushkin told NTV television that the administration will soon be cut by one-fifth to one-quarter.
NEWS
January 21, 1999 | From Associated Press
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin's ulcer will not require surgery because drug treatment appears to be working, his doctors decided Wednesday. Yeltsin, who has been hospitalized five times since his 1996 reelection, underwent a gastroscopy Wednesday, in which a fiber-optic thread with a tiny camera was passed through his mouth into his stomach, allowing doctors to inspect the ulcer.
NEWS
January 20, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Boris N. Yeltsin postponed a trip to France because of a bleeding ulcer, and his doctors scheduled tests to see if it requires surgery. Yeltsin, 67, has been hospitalized five times since winning reelection in 1996. Regardless of whether the Russian leader has an operation, Yeltsin's limited schedule will be scaled back even further on doctors' orders. The president may be hospitalized for up to three weeks and should not travel abroad for as long as three months, doctors said.
NEWS
May 14, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The television cameras were rolling. The Kremlin court was assembled. President Boris N. Yeltsin sat at the head of the table. To his right was Patriarch Alexi II, head of the Russian Orthodox Church; to his left was the soon-to-be-former prime minister, Yevgeny M. Primakov. Yeltsin began to speak, then paused. Something was wrong. His new first deputy prime minister, Sergei V. Stepashin, was across the room--not in his proper place next to Primakov. Yeltsin glowered at his ministers.
NEWS
February 9, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ignoring his doctors' advice not to travel, a frail President Boris N. Yeltsin flew to Jordan on Monday to pay his respects to King Hussein--and to remind the world that Russia's leader still has a place in international affairs. Arriving at the king's palace in Amman, Yeltsin, 68, walked slowly up the steps with the help of an aide. Appearing somewhat disoriented, he waved to people in the crowd outside, then spent about 15 minutes in the palace before departing.
NEWS
January 31, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin was moved to a health resort outside Moscow after two weeks of hospital treatment for a stomach ulcer, the Kremlin press service said. As if to emphasize that he is still in charge in spite of his ailment, Yeltsin reportedly signed a decree to reduce the size of his administration. Presidential spokesman Dmitri D. Yakushkin told NTV television that the administration will soon be cut by one-fifth to one-quarter.
NEWS
January 21, 1999 | From Associated Press
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin's ulcer will not require surgery because drug treatment appears to be working, his doctors decided Wednesday. Yeltsin, who has been hospitalized five times since his 1996 reelection, underwent a gastroscopy Wednesday, in which a fiber-optic thread with a tiny camera was passed through his mouth into his stomach, allowing doctors to inspect the ulcer.
NEWS
January 20, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Boris N. Yeltsin postponed a trip to France because of a bleeding ulcer, and his doctors scheduled tests to see if it requires surgery. Yeltsin, 67, has been hospitalized five times since winning reelection in 1996. Regardless of whether the Russian leader has an operation, Yeltsin's limited schedule will be scaled back even further on doctors' orders. The president may be hospitalized for up to three weeks and should not travel abroad for as long as three months, doctors said.
NEWS
January 19, 1999 | From Associated Press
President Boris N. Yeltsin has made so many trips to the hospital in the past few years that his latest illness, a bleeding ulcer, provoked no panic in Russia. In fact, it barely raised eyebrows. "The less Yeltsin interferes, the faster Russia's [economic] recovery will be," Communist Party leader Gennady A. Zyuganov said Monday, a day after the president was admitted to Moscow's Central Clinical Hospital.
NEWS
January 18, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin, whose poor health has left Russia without strong leadership for more than two years, was hospitalized again Sunday with what the Kremlin said was a bleeding stomach ulcer. The Kremlin said Yeltsin, 67, would be confined to bed for an indefinite period but was in stable condition and would not transfer any of his constitutional powers to Prime Minister Yevgeny M. Primakov. "The president feels fine," Primakov told the Itar-Tass news service.
NEWS
March 18, 1998 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin's latest illness--a severe sore throat and respiratory problems--led his staff Tuesday to cancel a summit of post-Soviet leaders of the Commonwealth of Independent States. It had been scheduled for Thursday.
NEWS
March 21, 1998 | From Associated Press
On the advice of Boris N. Yeltsin's doctors, a summit planned for next week was moved Friday to Moscow to spare the Russian leader the trip, raising new questions about his health. The president had paid an unexpected visit to the Kremlin in the morning, as if to demonstrate he was in top form. He spent three hours conferring on arrangements for the summit to be held with German Chancellor Helmut Kohl and French President Jacques Chirac.
NEWS
November 28, 1998 | Associated Press
For the first time, the Kremlin acknowledged Friday that President Boris N. Yeltsin has a history of heart attacks and, in language unusual for its bluntness, said the attacks have compromised his health. Doctors have long said that Yeltsin suffered a heart attack during his 1996 reelection campaign, and Russian media have reported that he has had as many as five.
NEWS
November 24, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid growing concern over Russia's political stability, President Boris N. Yeltsin was reduced Monday to holding a summit with China's president in a hospital, where the Kremlin said he is suffering from pneumonia. The Kremlin said Yeltsin was rushed to Moscow's elite Central Clinical Hospital on Sunday with a fever of 102 degrees. He was put on antibiotics and his temperature returned to normal, officials said, but he is likely to remain in the hospital for more than a week.
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