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NEWS
November 12, 1995 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nadezhda Sevastyanova leaned against the cold wall of a subway station, dragging deeply on her Winston cigarette as if to stave off the fatigue she carried under her eyes. "Everybody knows 'The Ministry of Health warns that smoking is harmful,' but we keep smoking anyway," the 38-year-old bookkeeper said. "I know I shouldn't smoke. It's a stupid habit. I don't want my child to smoke." Like millions of Russians, Sevastyanova just can't bring herself to quit.
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NEWS
November 7, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the second case of anthrax in the former Soviet Union in a week, Russian experts in the Ural Mountains city of Yekaterinburg found spores of the deadly disease in a U.S. diplomatic mailbag. No staff members at the U.S. Consulate in Yekaterinburg exhibited symptoms of the illness, but one employee is taking antibiotics as a precaution, according to a statement from the consulate Tuesday.
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NEWS
December 15, 1997 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An old cliche about Soviet Russia was that no one here smiled. But one of the secrets long hidden behind the Iron Curtain was the millions of gapped, iron-toothed mouths, mauled by the most basic of dentistry techniques and the most primitive of Warsaw Pact equipment. Now Russians, growing self-assured as their lives begin to stabilize after years of political and economic upheaval, are finding time and money to rectify the situation.
NEWS
June 20, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Eight children were hospitalized with high fevers and skin eruptions after playing with smallpox vaccine they found at a garbage dump in Vladivostok, Russia, officials said. They said the children, ages 11 to 14, were not seriously ill and there was no risk of them catching smallpox. Police said the ampuls were found near a public health station and they surmised that the facility had not followed proper procedure in disposing of them.
NEWS
February 22, 1996 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's one of those sodden, snow-crusted days when the sky looks like dishwater, the office temperature won't budge above chilly and Dr. Vladimir N. Serov dreams of Santa Barbara. Not the town. The soap opera. The television melodrama has set Russians swooning for years, and it has inspired Serov to dream as well. He marvels aloud at the medical care on the show. He wishes he could lift it from the TV and graft it onto Russian society. Starting with his own obstetrics practice.
MAGAZINE
February 21, 1993 | PAUL LOWE, Paul Lowe spent six weeks in Kazakhstan photographing its people. He is a free-lance photographer who has worked extensively in Eastern Europe since the revolution in 1989.
On Aug. 29, 1949, the Soviet Union exploded its first atom bomb. Bizhamal Samarova, now 70, lived about 30 miles from that original ground zero. "We were told to run to the banks of the river," she recalls. "The bomb exploded. I saw a red ball. Heard a great thunder. Dogs began to howl." Samarova says she was permanently blinded by that first explosion. And it was only the beginning.
NEWS
November 24, 1999 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
As the world closes in on a new millennium, the AIDS conflagration continues to blaze out of control throughout most of the developing world. Despite lowered death rates in the United States and Europe as a result of new drug therapies, more than 50 million people worldwide will have been infected by the AIDS virus and 16.3 million will have died by the end of the year, according to a report issued Tuesday by a United Nations program on HIV and AIDS. In 1999 alone, there will have been 2.
NEWS
November 12, 1995 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dima is 5 years old but has only just begun to speak. He parrots words but seems to understand little of what is said to him. He walks on tiptoe, and his hooded eyes, eyebrows and mouth all slant downward, pulling his tiny face into an unhappy crescent moon. A child of the new Russia, Dima has been cursed by this nation's ancient, now resurgent enemy: alcoholism.
NEWS
November 13, 1995 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alarmed by the diphtheria epidemic galloping across the former Soviet Union, the World Health Organization, UNICEF and the International Committee of the Red Cross declared an international health emergency in June and appealed for $33 million to help eradicate the deadly disease. "This is the biggest public health threat in Europe since World War II," declared Dr. Jo Asvall, WHO's European regional director. The response has been underwhelming.
NEWS
December 22, 1994 | From Reuters
A cold snap continued to take its toll on Moscow's heavy drinkers, leaving 31 people frozen to death in the capital since the start of the month, the Russian Health Ministry said Wednesday. All the victims were drunk, the ministry added. Thousands of homeless people, many of them alcoholics, have long used railroad stations, doorways and entrances to the subway system as night shelters in a city where no provision is made for the homeless.
NEWS
November 24, 1999 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
As the world closes in on a new millennium, the AIDS conflagration continues to blaze out of control throughout most of the developing world. Despite lowered death rates in the United States and Europe as a result of new drug therapies, more than 50 million people worldwide will have been infected by the AIDS virus and 16.3 million will have died by the end of the year, according to a report issued Tuesday by a United Nations program on HIV and AIDS. In 1999 alone, there will have been 2.
NEWS
March 25, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia's raging tuberculosis epidemic has spread to Scandinavia through emigration and threatens other Western countries, including the United States, officials of the World Health Organization warned Tuesday. The alarming rate of new TB cases reported in Russia and other Eastern European countries last year underscores earlier cautions that collapsing health care systems in the former Communist world have caused the disease, which already kills 3 million in the world each year, to flourish.
NEWS
December 15, 1997 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An old cliche about Soviet Russia was that no one here smiled. But one of the secrets long hidden behind the Iron Curtain was the millions of gapped, iron-toothed mouths, mauled by the most basic of dentistry techniques and the most primitive of Warsaw Pact equipment. Now Russians, growing self-assured as their lives begin to stabilize after years of political and economic upheaval, are finding time and money to rectify the situation.
NEWS
November 28, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With its broken windows, crumbling staircases and sagging perimeter fence, the National Tuberculosis Center on tree-shaded Gorodskaya Street stands as a fitting monument to the lofty and elusive goals of the Soviet medical system. Tuberculosis is epidemic in this and other former Soviet republics, but the costly and ineffectual treatment regime bequeathed by Communist-era planners is proving more hindrance than help in efforts to check the disease's spread.
NEWS
July 30, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin has been absent from the public eye--with the exception of an American vice presidential visit--for a month now, and aides continue to deny that he is sick or on vacation. That has left Kremlin watchers ever more mystified as to who is running Russia. Decrees are issued in Yeltsin's name in the day-to-day work of taxing and spending.
NEWS
February 22, 1996 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's one of those sodden, snow-crusted days when the sky looks like dishwater, the office temperature won't budge above chilly and Dr. Vladimir N. Serov dreams of Santa Barbara. Not the town. The soap opera. The television melodrama has set Russians swooning for years, and it has inspired Serov to dream as well. He marvels aloud at the medical care on the show. He wishes he could lift it from the TV and graft it onto Russian society. Starting with his own obstetrics practice.
NEWS
February 17, 1994 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Embracing U.S. scientific standards, Russia has decided to allow near-automatic importation of hundreds of thousands of prescription and over-the-counter drugs made by American companies, the Clinton Administration announced Wednesday. The decision should significantly enhance public health in a country whose quality of health care has deteriorated in recent years along with its overall economy, officials said. It also could boost long-term profits for U.S. pharmaceutical companies, they said.
NEWS
June 25, 1992 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Crouching on all fours, Mikhail Kovalchuk, a 42-year-old businessman, craned his head forward, tensed his neck muscles, stuck out his tongue and exhaled with a violent hissing sound. Then he gingerly turned around to ensure that Jane DeRosa, his American boarder, was following suit. As DeRosa tried to smother her laughter, her Russian host-father solemnly explained that assuming this "lion position" several times a day and snacking on cranberries and honey would cure her laryngitis.
NEWS
November 13, 1995 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alarmed by the diphtheria epidemic galloping across the former Soviet Union, the World Health Organization, UNICEF and the International Committee of the Red Cross declared an international health emergency in June and appealed for $33 million to help eradicate the deadly disease. "This is the biggest public health threat in Europe since World War II," declared Dr. Jo Asvall, WHO's European regional director. The response has been underwhelming.
NEWS
November 13, 1995 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This pleasant, tree-lined city had a nasty visitor recently: a dysentery outbreak that sickened almost 1,900 people and left residents wondering whether they can ever trust their tap water again. It is a problem that no longer is a rarity. With basic sanitation and water treatment facilities deteriorating in cities across Russia, the incidence of dysentery, which is spread by fecal contamination in water or food, is up 26% over the past year.
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