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NEWS
February 24, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They are 19 lost boys, orphaned, abandoned or sent away. Blank-faced, they march like windup toy soldiers around the snowy parade ground at the military unit that is home. But the smallest pair of boots is out of step. With a pathos that could melt icy hearts, the youngest boy, 12-year-old Boris Vorobyov, skips to regain the pace, his face rigid with determination. He soon falls out of step again, battling to fit in.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2003 | Linda Hales, Washington Post
In the movie "Russian Ark," centuries of history are reenacted by a cast of thousands in sumptuous period costumes. Time flows, but the characters, including the Greats, Peter and Catherine, are trapped in the galleries of the State Hermitage Museum. In this eerie fantasy, Mikhail B. Piotrovsky, the museum's director and Russia's cultural ambassador, plays himself. Piotrovsky's scene is set in the tumultuous 20th century.
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NEWS
March 22, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The ship, a fragment detached from the Earth, went on lonely and swift like a small planet." --Joseph Conrad * For 15 years, it has circled the world, silently keeping aloft the dream that humans will one day colonize the cosmos. Now, as the Mir space station drifts toward its demise tonight--a plummet in a blazing cascade over the southern Pacific Ocean--those who have built and flown the hulking marvel are mourning the passage of one of history's valiant ships.
WORLD
May 29, 2002 | DAVID HOLLEY and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
PRATICA DI MARE AIR BASE, Italy -- NATO took a step Tuesday that was at once extraordinary and a recognition of a new reality by formally bringing Russia into a unique role with the alliance created 53 years ago to defend the West against the Soviet Union.
NEWS
February 3, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Innocently, they arranged themselves as if posing for a family picture: the czarina and the sickly young czarevich sitting, the czar and the four pretty grand duchesses arrayed around them with the family doctor and servants. Then the bullets flew. Screams. Moans. Ricochets. The thrusts of bayonets and thumps of rifle butts. Eventual silence. Blood on the cellar room's walls and floor.
NEWS
April 12, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Braided whips and ceremonial sabers at their sides, mustachioed men in World War I vintage uniforms and knee-high boots crowded in rowdy fashion around the long table, looking like ancestral portraits that had stepped down from the wall. Assembled in the Ataman Palace for a Saturday morning powwow on tactics, each of the men was himself an ataman, or Cossack chieftain. And they were arguing with the urgent energy of men who see power within their grasp.
NEWS
July 31, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 79-year-old retired KGB agent who helped send hundreds of Estonians to Siberia 50 years ago was convicted Friday of crimes against humanity and sentenced to four years in prison. Mikhail A. Neverovsky, who was found guilty of selecting 274 people for deportation and personally putting three families on a train bound for Siberia, received the harshest sentence yet in Estonia for participating in mass deportations of the Soviet era.
NEWS
December 20, 1998 | Reuters
A bust of dictator Josef Stalin was unveiled Saturday in a Russian school to applause from local Communists and protests from teachers opposed to honoring the memory of a man responsible for the deaths of millions. NTV television, in a report from the southern Urals city of Chelyabinsk, said it was the first time a memorial to Stalin had been restored in Russia since the collapse of the Soviet Union.
NEWS
December 24, 1993 | STEVE GUTTERMAN, TIMES MOSCOW BUREAU
Is post-election Russia the equivalent of Germany's hapless Weimar Republic? Comparisons by Russian and Westerners have run so rampant that many now are simply nit-picking over exactly which Weimar year today's Russia resembles most. Is Vladimir V. Zhirinovsky, the neo-fascist whose party showed surprising strength in recent parliamentary elections, the Adolf Hitler of 1924, 1929 or 1932? Even Boris N.
NEWS
September 2, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alexei Alexeyev gets a little wistful when he describes his youth, growing up in a town where a researcher was king and scientific achievement was the Soviet Union's proudest boast. "The atmosphere was unbelievable--there was no other place in the world that had such enthusiasm for scientific ideas," recalled Alexeyev, a 42-year-old mathematician-turned-entrepreneur.
NEWS
September 2, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alexei Alexeyev gets a little wistful when he describes his youth, growing up in a town where a researcher was king and scientific achievement was the Soviet Union's proudest boast. "The atmosphere was unbelievable--there was no other place in the world that had such enthusiasm for scientific ideas," recalled Alexeyev, a 42-year-old mathematician-turned-entrepreneur.
NEWS
March 22, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The ship, a fragment detached from the Earth, went on lonely and swift like a small planet." --Joseph Conrad * For 15 years, it has circled the world, silently keeping aloft the dream that humans will one day colonize the cosmos. Now, as the Mir space station drifts toward its demise tonight--a plummet in a blazing cascade over the southern Pacific Ocean--those who have built and flown the hulking marvel are mourning the passage of one of history's valiant ships.
NEWS
February 24, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They are 19 lost boys, orphaned, abandoned or sent away. Blank-faced, they march like windup toy soldiers around the snowy parade ground at the military unit that is home. But the smallest pair of boots is out of step. With a pathos that could melt icy hearts, the youngest boy, 12-year-old Boris Vorobyov, skips to regain the pace, his face rigid with determination. He soon falls out of step again, battling to fit in.
NEWS
May 31, 2000 | Reuters
Soviet dictator Josef Stalin was so angry with Josip Broz Tito that his special services were planning to assassinate the Yugoslav leader. The plan was dropped in 1953 when Stalin died, according to a collection of Cold War archives compiled by the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, a U.S. think tank. Tito died in 1980.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1999 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
"After the pickup on the campus, Lona Cohen hurried to the railroad station. It was wartime, and military policemen were everywhere." That excerpt epitomizes the tense espionage tone of the opening hour of "Red Files," a four-part PBS documentary that some may prefer tonight even over "Ally McBeal," "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit" and Ray and Debra haggling over a can opener in "Everybody Loves Raymond."
NEWS
July 31, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 79-year-old retired KGB agent who helped send hundreds of Estonians to Siberia 50 years ago was convicted Friday of crimes against humanity and sentenced to four years in prison. Mikhail A. Neverovsky, who was found guilty of selecting 274 people for deportation and personally putting three families on a train bound for Siberia, received the harshest sentence yet in Estonia for participating in mass deportations of the Soviet era.
NEWS
October 27, 1996 | DAVID HOFFMAN, WASHINGTON POST
Less than a year after the collapse of the Soviet Union, a group of Russia's top atomic weapons scientists contracted with the United States to produce a massive study of Soviet nuclear weapons testing, providing firsthand information about Cold War events stretching over more than four decades, according to documents and interviews with key Russian participants.
NEWS
February 24, 1998 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever since their past was swallowed up by war in 1993, the members of Azerbaijan's Karabakh soccer team have lived the shiftless lives of refugees, carrying on with their sport even though they have not set eyes on their homeland of Nagorno-Karabakh since its Armenian majority drove the men out of the disputed enclave in a vicious ethnic war. The dispossessed soccer stars slowly reassembled in this filthy industrial town 300 miles east of the sparkling, but now deadly, hills of their birth.
NEWS
July 30, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a young agent of the Soviet secret police, Mikhail A. Neverovsky remembers going with a squad of soldiers to the homes of two families in 1949 and delivering the order: They would be sent to Siberia that day. "We gave them two hours to collect everything, first at one house and then the other," Neverovsky recalled in an interview last week. "I helped them pack their things."
NEWS
June 4, 1999 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Russia, a country rich with writers, one literary figure towers above the rest--above Dostoevsky, above Chekhov, above Tolstoy. These days, he literally towers. His picture is draped from the top of skyscrapers, his verses strung across the capital's boulevards. His writings are recited on every stage, from the Bolshoi to the corner soapbox to national news broadcasts. And if you're like most Americans, you've probably never heard of him. He is Alexander Pushkin, Russia's national poet.
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