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NEWS
September 29, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Spartan apartments of the Mamulino military housing complex hardly qualify as luxurious even in destitute Russia, but they have become hot properties in a country with an army of homeless soldiers. And despite the best intentions of the German government that bankrolled the project, distribution of the coveted homes has fallen victim to the same labyrinthine network of favor-trading, influence-peddling, connections and caprice that dictates the sharing of wealth throughout Russia.
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WORLD
December 19, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - Russia's parliament took a first step Wednesday toward banning the adoption of Russian children by American parents, a move intended as retaliation for an anti-corruption law recently passed by Congress. The State Duma, the lower house of parliament, voted 399 to 17 in favor of a bill that included the ban and also would annul an adoption agreement between the two countries that Russia ratified in July. The measure still has to be approved by the upper house and signed by President Vladimir Putin, who has sent mixed signals about his support.
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NEWS
September 25, 1997 | From Associated Press
A hotly debated bill that many believe will curb freedom of religion in Russia won unanimous and final passage from parliament Wednesday and appeared certain to become law. Boris N. Yeltsin's spokesman has indicated that the president will sign the legislation, which enshrines Russia's conservative Orthodox Church as the country's preeminent religion.
WORLD
July 14, 2012 | By Khristina Narizhnaya, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - Russian lawmakers this week passed three measures to increase government control over the Internet, media and foreign-funded activist groups, despite widespread protests from Web professionals, journalists and human rights advocates. A bill that criminalizes libel and imposes fines of up to $153,400 on violators, and a measure that requires nongovernmental organizations, or NGOs, that receive foreign funding to register as "foreign agents," were approved by the lower house of the parliament Friday, the last day of the legislative session.
WORLD
July 14, 2012 | By Khristina Narizhnaya, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - Russian lawmakers this week passed three measures to increase government control over the Internet, media and foreign-funded activist groups, despite widespread protests from Web professionals, journalists and human rights advocates. A bill that criminalizes libel and imposes fines of up to $153,400 on violators, and a measure that requires nongovernmental organizations, or NGOs, that receive foreign funding to register as "foreign agents," were approved by the lower house of the parliament Friday, the last day of the legislative session.
NEWS
December 6, 1996 | From Reuters
The upper house of Russia's parliament Thursday publicly laid claim to Ukraine's Black Sea naval port of Sevastopol, saying it was part of Russia and Kiev had no legal right to govern it. The Federation Council, in a move likely to cause a storm of protest in Kiev and further worsen mistrustful relations between the two governments, endorsed the demand that Ukraine surrender the city by a majority of 110 to 14.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Western cinematic images of the Soviet Union, mostly the product of decades of spy movies and other films about the Cold War, are about to be challenged by a new film that its director says will show "a different Russia," one that is gentler and more human, a country that today is deeply troubled but undergoing profound changes.
BOOKS
June 18, 1989 | Elliott Roosevelt, Roosevelt is the author of "The Eleanor Roosevelt Mystery Series." Last of the series published was "Murder in the Oval Office" (St. Martin's Press). and
I have to apologize at the outset of this review. I sold my house the end of March; went on a cruise for the month of April and agreed to read and review this book during the month of May and, at the same time, pack and move out of my house. The result is that "The Russia House" has been digested between packing chores and maybe my viewpoint has suffered somewhat. John le Carre is a very popular best-selling author with a fine reputation in the intrigue and thriller field. Such books as "The Spy Who Came In Out of the Cold" and "Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy" enjoyed wide acclaim, as have most of his other novels.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1990 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In "The Russia House," based on the 1988 John le Carre novel, Sean Connery plays a London publisher who is coerced into becoming a spy. Connery's Barley Blair isn't your usual stuffy bookish type; he's boozy and blustery and he likes to tootle on his saxophone. He may be a malcontent but he's a startlingly exuberant malcontent. As a newly minted spook, Barley doesn't sport the shifty-eyed anonymity common to his tribe.
NEWS
September 1, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The struggle for power in Russia escalated Monday as legislators refused to confirm Viktor S. Chernomyrdin, President Boris N. Yeltsin's choice for prime minister, despite warnings that the country is on the brink of economic chaos. The Duma, the lower house of parliament, voted a resounding 253 to 94 to reject the nomination of Chernomyrdin, who previously served for five years as Yeltsin's prime minister and presided over much of Russia's post-Soviet transformation.
NEWS
September 1, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The struggle for power in Russia escalated Monday as legislators refused to confirm Viktor S. Chernomyrdin, President Boris N. Yeltsin's choice for prime minister, despite warnings that the country is on the brink of economic chaos. The Duma, the lower house of parliament, voted a resounding 253 to 94 to reject the nomination of Chernomyrdin, who previously served for five years as Yeltsin's prime minister and presided over much of Russia's post-Soviet transformation.
NEWS
July 2, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Communist-dominated lower house of parliament, indicating a willingness to cooperate with President Boris N. Yeltsin, gave preliminary approval Wednesday to part of the austerity program proposed by the Kremlin to end Russia's fiscal crisis. While opposition leaders warned that the program was insufficient to bail out the economy, the Duma gave tentative approval to nine of 20 major tax and spending measures offered by Yeltsin and Prime Minister Sergei V. Kiriyenko.
NEWS
September 25, 1997 | From Associated Press
A hotly debated bill that many believe will curb freedom of religion in Russia won unanimous and final passage from parliament Wednesday and appeared certain to become law. Boris N. Yeltsin's spokesman has indicated that the president will sign the legislation, which enshrines Russia's conservative Orthodox Church as the country's preeminent religion.
NEWS
December 6, 1996 | From Reuters
The upper house of Russia's parliament Thursday publicly laid claim to Ukraine's Black Sea naval port of Sevastopol, saying it was part of Russia and Kiev had no legal right to govern it. The Federation Council, in a move likely to cause a storm of protest in Kiev and further worsen mistrustful relations between the two governments, endorsed the demand that Ukraine surrender the city by a majority of 110 to 14.
NEWS
September 29, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Spartan apartments of the Mamulino military housing complex hardly qualify as luxurious even in destitute Russia, but they have become hot properties in a country with an army of homeless soldiers. And despite the best intentions of the German government that bankrolled the project, distribution of the coveted homes has fallen victim to the same labyrinthine network of favor-trading, influence-peddling, connections and caprice that dictates the sharing of wealth throughout Russia.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1990 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In "The Russia House," based on the 1988 John le Carre novel, Sean Connery plays a London publisher who is coerced into becoming a spy. Connery's Barley Blair isn't your usual stuffy bookish type; he's boozy and blustery and he likes to tootle on his saxophone. He may be a malcontent but he's a startlingly exuberant malcontent. As a newly minted spook, Barley doesn't sport the shifty-eyed anonymity common to his tribe.
NEWS
July 2, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Communist-dominated lower house of parliament, indicating a willingness to cooperate with President Boris N. Yeltsin, gave preliminary approval Wednesday to part of the austerity program proposed by the Kremlin to end Russia's fiscal crisis. While opposition leaders warned that the program was insufficient to bail out the economy, the Duma gave tentative approval to nine of 20 major tax and spending measures offered by Yeltsin and Prime Minister Sergei V. Kiriyenko.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1990 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The backers of tonight's benefit premiere of "The Russia House," starring Sean Connery and Michelle Pfeiffer, hope it will be more than a glittering debut of a new movie. They want it to be the beginning of a turnaround for the Motion Picture and Television Fund that has seen contributions sharply decline in the face of rising costs. "It's not a crisis situation," said Roger Davis, a top executive at the William Morris Agency and the current fund president. "But the problem is that we're starting to lose money and we depend heavily on voluntary contributions and bequests from the film industry's employees."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1990 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The backers of tonight's benefit premiere of "The Russia House," starring Sean Connery and Michelle Pfeiffer, hope it will be more than a glittering debut of a new movie. They want it to be the beginning of a turnaround for the Motion Picture and Television Fund that has seen contributions sharply decline in the face of rising costs. "It's not a crisis situation," said Roger Davis, a top executive at the William Morris Agency and the current fund president. "But the problem is that we're starting to lose money and we depend heavily on voluntary contributions and bequests from the film industry's employees."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Western cinematic images of the Soviet Union, mostly the product of decades of spy movies and other films about the Cold War, are about to be challenged by a new film that its director says will show "a different Russia," one that is gentler and more human, a country that today is deeply troubled but undergoing profound changes.
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