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NEWS
September 29, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vladimir A. Ovchinnikov--the quintessential representative of Russia's influential industrialist class--is easily the most powerful man in this ancient Russian city. As general director of the Aleksandrov Radio Factory, the city's largest enterprise and Russia's largest producer of televisions, he is responsible for the livelihoods of nearly half the city's 130,000 residents.
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NEWS
July 29, 2000 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an odd Kremlin meeting that was both a scolding and a pep talk, President Vladimir V. Putin tried to patch up relations with Russia's captains of industry Friday, exhorting them to support his economic program and stop using their media outlets to "politicize" legal actions against big business. Arrayed around an enormous table in an ornate Kremlin hall, 21 business leaders listened impassively as Putin tried to put to rest concerns that he had launched a war against them.
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NEWS
July 21, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Until state planning collapsed with the Soviet Union at the start of this decade, Valentina Lukshina never had to make a major decision about her life. She studied metallurgy because she came from the coal-mining region of Novokuznetsk. She then moved to this remote steelmaking city in the "distribution"--a Soviet-era practice of deploying college graduates wherever the state deemed their labor most needed.
NEWS
March 4, 2000 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Foreign investors in the historic Lomonosov Porcelain Factory celebrated victory Friday after a Russian appeals court scuttled a months-long effort to renationalize the plant. In a case widely viewed as a test of the rights of investors in Russian companies, a regional arbitration court Thursday overturned a lower court's October decision that had annulled the 1993 privatization of the factory. Investors, headed by a fund financed by U.S.
NEWS
March 7, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Larisa Baranova comes to the gates of the March 8 Weaving Factory every day with her 3-year-old son and the desperate hope that maybe, just maybe, this time the plant will pay her the three months' salary it owes her. "So far, there's only silence," she said, swallowing tears. Silence, too, reigns in the eerie factory halls lined with top-grade weaving machines, now idled, draped in cloth and looking as if there are oversized corpses beneath.
NEWS
September 14, 1997 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armed with military rifles and pursuing their prey in motorboats, the Chukchi men of this coastal village have become the most proficient whale hunters in Russia. With the breakup of the Soviet Union--and the end of its control over whaling by indigenous people--Lorino's inhabitants began hunting in the Bering Strait in 1994 for California gray whales to feed themselves and their foxes.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Russia Postpones Privatization of Lada Car Plant: The postponement of the privatization of half the giant Lada car plant was due to disputes between its management and the government over where share auctions should be held, government officials said Tuesday. A government spokesman said Lada management wanted to sell fewer shares at inter-regional tenders across Russia to keep control over the plant.
NEWS
January 29, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia's new prime minister, in a remarkable conversion to free-market beliefs, acknowledged Thursday that the threat of hyper-inflation is a "greater evil" than unemployment and announced a program to restrict subsidies to failing state-owned industries.
NEWS
May 25, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia is entering a new phase in its economic reforms and will now concentrate on fighting its disastrous industrial slump and bringing order to its tax system, officials said Tuesday. "You could call this the beginning of the stabilization period," Economics Minister Alexander N. Shokhin said, "although the statistics don't bear that out yet."
NEWS
March 5, 1999 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every day, a miracle of loaves and fishes takes place in this Russian town. In the gray of morning, thousands of workers emerge from concrete apartment blocks carrying empty tin lunch pails. They trudge out of town, across a snowy field and into a ramshackle set of buildings called the Tutayev Engine Factory. They work all day but produce next to nothing. The factory loses money but is not bankrupt. No one gets paid, but they don't go hungry.
NEWS
November 30, 1998 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With evident satisfaction, Alexander Z. Vartanov strained to be heard over the din of clanking bottles. "There are three things a man can watch forever without growing bored," the factory foreman said with the air of someone unburdening himself of an ancient Russian proverb. "A fire burning, water flowing . . . and other people working."
NEWS
May 7, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prosecutors were closing in Wednesday on a group of former top-level government officials, often labeled "young reformers," who allegedly received property illegally through the state privatization program they helped run. Alfred Kokh, President Boris N. Yeltsin's former privatization chief, was charged Tuesday with embezzlement for allegedly accepting a government-owned apartment in central Moscow.
NEWS
October 3, 1997 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Velvet-antlered reindeer are tethered outside the nomads' tents, trampling whitish moss underfoot and barking softly as the full moon rises. There's snow in the air. The autumn temperature is well below freezing in the austerely beautiful hills of the Russian Far North. And when the old men of the Evenki people go to sleep in the reindeer-herding uplands of their forefathers, they say they listen to the earth beneath them snoring.
NEWS
September 14, 1997 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armed with military rifles and pursuing their prey in motorboats, the Chukchi men of this coastal village have become the most proficient whale hunters in Russia. With the breakup of the Soviet Union--and the end of its control over whaling by indigenous people--Lorino's inhabitants began hunting in the Bering Strait in 1994 for California gray whales to feed themselves and their foxes.
NEWS
September 14, 1997 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here on the frigid shore of the Bering Sea, human endeavor has brought together two animals--the fox and the whale--in a way that nature never contemplated. On the beach, the bones and blubber of 39 California gray whales lie slowly decaying where the 35-ton animals were butchered. Waves wash over a whale's severed head and backbone, dragging its giant intestines back to sea.
NEWS
July 22, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The woe-is-me countenance of Yuri Skomorokhov could be said to be the face of capitalist Russia. A successful business, a supportive family and a home in this verdant Volga River boomtown have yet to disabuse the 35-year-old entrepreneur of his conviction that Russia's turn of history forced him to sell his soul.
NEWS
September 4, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The rusty iron gates of the Kirov Factory creak open grudgingly, heralding the decrepitude and indifference within. A bored security guard, interrupted in his exercise of tipping back on the rear legs of his chair, eyes visitors languidly and takes another drag on his cigarette before bestirring himself to let them in.
NEWS
July 22, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The woe-is-me countenance of Yuri Skomorokhov could be said to be the face of capitalist Russia. A successful business, a supportive family and a home in this verdant Volga River boomtown have yet to disabuse the 35-year-old entrepreneur of his conviction that Russia's turn of history forced him to sell his soul.
NEWS
July 21, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Until state planning collapsed with the Soviet Union at the start of this decade, Valentina Lukshina never had to make a major decision about her life. She studied metallurgy because she came from the coal-mining region of Novokuznetsk. She then moved to this remote steelmaking city in the "distribution"--a Soviet-era practice of deploying college graduates wherever the state deemed their labor most needed.
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