Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRussia Landmarks
IN THE NEWS

Russia Landmarks

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 30, 2000 | Associated Press
The giant TV tower that was greatly damaged in a fire--severely affecting broadcasting in the nation--is stable enough to be restored, officials said Tuesday. About 25% of the 149 steel cables that bind sections of the 1,772-foot Ostankino tower were damaged, Emergencies Minister Sergei K. Shoigu said, but experts have inspected the structure for two days and concluded that it is stable.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 30, 2000 | Associated Press
The giant TV tower that was greatly damaged in a fire--severely affecting broadcasting in the nation--is stable enough to be restored, officials said Tuesday. About 25% of the 149 steel cables that bind sections of the 1,772-foot Ostankino tower were damaged, Emergencies Minister Sergei K. Shoigu said, but experts have inspected the structure for two days and concluded that it is stable.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 29, 2000 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Another grandiose icon of Russian nationhood has toppled figuratively--and nearly literally. On Monday, after a virulent electrical fire gutted Moscow's landmark Ostankino TV tower, officials reported that it was listing slightly. The bodies of two people were discovered after the fire inside a damaged elevator. Four people had been reported missing--three firefighters and an elevator operator.
NEWS
August 29, 2000 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Another grandiose icon of Russian nationhood has toppled figuratively--and nearly literally. On Monday, after a virulent electrical fire gutted Moscow's landmark Ostankino TV tower, officials reported that it was listing slightly. The bodies of two people were discovered after the fire inside a damaged elevator. Four people had been reported missing--three firefighters and an elevator operator.
NEWS
October 28, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seventy-six years after Vladimir I. Lenin confiscated all private property, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin signed a decree Wednesday guaranteeing Russians the right to buy and sell private land. The landmark order also allows Russian corporations and individuals to partition, inherit, mortgage or rent land. And it specifies that the government may not confiscate land without fair market compensation.
NEWS
October 28, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seventy-six years after Vladimir I. Lenin confiscated all private property, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin signed a decree Wednesday guaranteeing Russians the right to buy and sell private land. The landmark order also allows Russian corporations and individuals to partition, inherit, mortgage or rent land. And it specifies that the government may not confiscate land without fair market compensation.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|