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NEWS
July 4, 1991 | Reuters
The Russian Parliament adopted privatization laws Wednesday that were more sweeping than similar legislation approved by the Soviet legislature two days before. The information agency for the Russian Federation, the richest and most powerful of the 15 Soviet republics, described the laws as a step toward a market economy. "Every Russian will become a proprietor," it said. "State and municipal enterprises, individual workshops, industries will be privatized.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
California legislators are jumping into the fray over new Russian laws seen as an infringement of the rights of gays and lesbians. Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento) and others have signed on to support a resolution to be introduced Monday by Sen. Mark Leno (D-San Francisco) that urges California's public retirement systems not to invest future resources in Russia. The resolution is in response to new laws signed by Russian President Vladimir Putin that ban gay adoptions as well as “propaganda of nontraditional sexual relations," including gay pride events.
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NEWS
October 29, 1992 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Renouncing a Stalin-era code of morality that condemned homosexuality as a crime, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin on Wednesday proposed a new penal code that would lift a longstanding ban on "male love." Even under the relatively liberal politics of recent years, hundreds of men have been sentenced to labor camps under Article 121-1 of the Russian Criminal Code, a statute inherited from Soviet law that prohibits sex between men, the Ministry of Justice said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1999 | CATHERINE BLAKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In Russia there is no such crime as spousal abuse. They don't even have the concept of a restraining order. In fact no distinctions are made between killing your spouse and killing your neighbor, or beating your child and beating a bar mate. But that could change when six high-ranking Russian officials return home from Ventura County, taking with them the tools to define and combat the problem of violence within families.
NEWS
January 10, 1997 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The capitalism that has flourished in Russia since Soviet communism died finally has the full blessing of the law. Five years after Russians started flocking to the streets to buy and sell foreign goods and currency, a new penal code has been introduced that makes such commerce legal. Better late than never?
NEWS
February 8, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Children are for sale in Tula!" television broadcasts and newspaper headlines have been screaming about the latest adoption scandal. Communist deputies in the Duma, the lower house of parliament, are angrily pushing for a virtual ban on foreign adoptions, claiming that Russian children sent abroad may be abused, killed or plundered for their organs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1993 | From Religious News Service
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin has rejected a proposed new law to restrict the activity of Western missionaries and has asked lawmakers to consider revisions. Yeltsin's decision not to sign the measure into law, at least until it is revised, was apparently prompted by a desire for "a more democratic version," according to Peter Deyneka of Russian Ministries, a Wheaton, Ill., organization that specializes in cross-cultural orientation for Western missionaries entering Russia.
NEWS
April 4, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin signed a controversial law Monday requiring AIDS testing of all foreigners living in Russia and ordering the deportation of anyone whose results show they have been infected. Although the new law is less restrictive than an earlier version passed by the Parliament and vetoed by Yeltsin in February, it immediately drew criticism from AIDS activists as an ineffective and costly violation of human rights.
NEWS
September 21, 1995 | From Times Wire Reports
Russian lawmakers announced the end of a ban on foreign adoptions that had left many children stuck in orphanages for months. The children, including many who had been in the final stages of adoption, have languished in Russian orphanages since March, when President Boris N. Yeltsin signed a new adoption law that allows foreigners to adopt healthy Russian infants. But the law was immediately followed by a ban on foreign adoptions while legislators debated how to implement the new law.
SPORTS
July 27, 1994 | MATT BIVENS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Deep inside the Smolensky Cemetery, several elderly babushkas sat on benches, soaking up sun, listening to birds sing. Usually they can be seen begging in front of St. Petersburg churches, but this week--which ought to be a bonanza, with thousands of foreigners in town for the 1994 Goodwill Games--they have been driven into hiding.
NEWS
October 21, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Environmentalist Alexander Nikitin had been in jail more than six months on espionage charges when one of the key secrecy acts he is accused of violating was finally adopted. The act, a Defense Ministry decree, is itself so secret that Nikitin and his lawyers had never even seen it until this week. Neither had the three judges who will soon decide whether Nikitin is guilty of treason.
NEWS
February 8, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Children are for sale in Tula!" television broadcasts and newspaper headlines have been screaming about the latest adoption scandal. Communist deputies in the Duma, the lower house of parliament, are angrily pushing for a virtual ban on foreign adoptions, claiming that Russian children sent abroad may be abused, killed or plundered for their organs.
NEWS
January 10, 1997 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The capitalism that has flourished in Russia since Soviet communism died finally has the full blessing of the law. Five years after Russians started flocking to the streets to buy and sell foreign goods and currency, a new penal code has been introduced that makes such commerce legal. Better late than never?
NEWS
January 14, 1996 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anya Pryanikova's hunt for a husband took a strange turn just before New Year's, when she married her cousin for the sake of a dull-looking black ink stamp. She liked her cousin, Alyosha, just fine. But not in a romantic, lustful sort of way. Pryanikova agreed to exchange vows with him for one reason alone: to help him obtain a Moscow propiska, a residence permit allowing him to live and work in Russia's capital.
NEWS
September 21, 1995 | From Times Wire Reports
Russian lawmakers announced the end of a ban on foreign adoptions that had left many children stuck in orphanages for months. The children, including many who had been in the final stages of adoption, have languished in Russian orphanages since March, when President Boris N. Yeltsin signed a new adoption law that allows foreigners to adopt healthy Russian infants. But the law was immediately followed by a ban on foreign adoptions while legislators debated how to implement the new law.
NEWS
August 2, 1995 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia on Tuesday delayed indefinitely the enforcement of a controversial law requiring that anyone who wishes to visit the country for more than three months be tested for AIDS. But Health and Foreign Ministry officials have left no doubt that, as soon as they can work out a way, they intend to require proof that visa applicants are free of the human immunodeficiency virus that causes AIDS. The law, signed by President Boris N. Yeltsin in April, officially took effect Tuesday.
NEWS
February 19, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian legislators, making a historic update to the criminal code, Thursday revoked the law that let czars and Communists alike sentence many of Russia's illustrious sons and daughters--from Fyodor Dostoevsky to Soviet-era dissidents--to Siberian exile or banishment. "This is especially pleasant for me because if events had developed otherwise, I would still have been imprisoned in exile," said Lev Timofeyev, a Moscow human rights activist released in 1987. "Thank God, all my friends are free."
NEWS
June 28, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No flashy raids or mass arrests were reported, but Russia entered a new regime Monday--the tougher new order dictated by President Boris N. Yeltsin's controversial decree cracking down on organized crime. From now on, Russian police on the trail of certain crimes have the authority to detain suspects for up to 30 days without bringing charges, search vehicles and offices without a warrant and inspect bank records without a court order.
NEWS
August 1, 1995
A new law requiring testing for the AIDS virus for all foreigners visiting Russia for three months or more takes effect today. Russian officials, however, appear confused about when and how the law will be implemented. "We know nothing about how this law will be applied," said Anatoly I. Borisyuk, head of the visa department at the Russian Foreign Ministry, who said there will be no changes until the agency receives instructions.
NEWS
April 4, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin signed a controversial law Monday requiring AIDS testing of all foreigners living in Russia and ordering the deportation of anyone whose results show they have been infected. Although the new law is less restrictive than an earlier version passed by the Parliament and vetoed by Yeltsin in February, it immediately drew criticism from AIDS activists as an ineffective and costly violation of human rights.
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