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August 11, 1996 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Members of Russia's Communist-led parliament, apparently not willing to risk open conflict with recently reelected President Boris N. Yeltsin, gritted their teeth and voted moderate reformer Viktor S. Chernomyrdin back into power as prime minister Saturday.
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NEWS
August 11, 1996 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Members of Russia's Communist-led parliament, apparently not willing to risk open conflict with recently reelected President Boris N. Yeltsin, gritted their teeth and voted moderate reformer Viktor S. Chernomyrdin back into power as prime minister Saturday.
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NEWS
December 13, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin and the Parliament, opponents in Russia's worst political crisis since the demise of the Soviet Union, made a peace pact Saturday that should let Yeltsin keep his prime minister for at least four months but dilutes Yeltsin's once-Titanic authority.
NEWS
December 18, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new Russian Parliament will be less fearsome than initial vote tallies had indicated but still less compliant than President Boris N. Yeltsin had hoped, according to near-final results released Friday. It does promise to be even more circus-like than its predecessor, with its august ranks including a television psychic and a renowned strongman.
NEWS
December 18, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new Russian Parliament will be less fearsome than initial vote tallies had indicated but still less compliant than President Boris N. Yeltsin had hoped, according to near-final results released Friday. It does promise to be even more circus-like than its predecessor, with its august ranks including a television psychic and a renowned strongman.
WORLD
February 6, 2004 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
Leaders of the lower house of Russia's parliament agreed Thursday to consider a constitutional amendment lengthening the presidential term to seven years, a step that could enable President Vladimir V. Putin to maintain power far beyond the current limit. It is unclear whether the amendment can be enacted before the March 14 balloting that Putin is likely to win.
NEWS
September 26, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The historic showdown ignited five days ago when President Boris N. Yeltsin dissolved Russia's Parliament fizzled Saturday into an exchange of theatrical insults as many lawmakers left their besieged and barricaded headquarters and headed home. The slow death of the Congress of People's Deputies moved the focus of resistance to Russia's regional legislatures, many of which are threatening to withhold taxes and block Yeltsin's plan for election of a new Parliament in December.
NEWS
October 7, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin demanded Wednesday night that Russia's regional legislatures, the last bastions of lawful resistance to his emergency rule, disband themselves and submit to the voters in December when a new national Parliament is elected. But he indicated that Communist and ultranationalist parties, a sizable and well-organized political bloc, would be disqualified from the Dec.
WORLD
December 8, 2003 | David Holley and Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writers
Pro-Kremlin parties were sweeping to victory in parliamentary elections Sunday, fortifying President Vladimir V. Putin's grip on power as he pushes for economic reforms and stronger state authority. The Putin-backed United Russia and two other generally pro-Kremlin parties were capturing nearly 60% of the vote, while the Communists were receiving just 13%, according to results with more than four-fifths of all ballots counted.
NEWS
December 13, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin and the Parliament, opponents in Russia's worst political crisis since the demise of the Soviet Union, made a peace pact Saturday that should let Yeltsin keep his prime minister for at least four months but dilutes Yeltsin's once-Titanic authority.
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