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November 13, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bowing to the inevitable, Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin backed down Tuesday from his imposition of a state of emergency in the Chechen-Ingush region, a rebellious Muslim enclave in Russia. The Soviet press, commenting on the first difficult test of Yeltsin's ability to solve ethnic problems, criticized him for initiating a policy so ineffectual and dangerous that it had to be immediately repealed.
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NEWS
November 13, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bowing to the inevitable, Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin backed down Tuesday from his imposition of a state of emergency in the Chechen-Ingush region, a rebellious Muslim enclave in Russia. The Soviet press, commenting on the first difficult test of Yeltsin's ability to solve ethnic problems, criticized him for initiating a policy so ineffectual and dangerous that it had to be immediately repealed.
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NEWS
November 10, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a potentially explosive showdown over their right to secede, militant nationalists in the mountainous, largely Muslim Chechen-Ingush region held their ground Saturday against Russian troop reinforcements and ignored the state of emergency decreed by Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin.
NEWS
November 11, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The strongman who now controls the predominantly Muslim Chechen-Ingush region of southern Russia went a step further Sunday by saying that only full secession will satisfy him. Russian Federation lawmakers, meanwhile, debated President Boris N. Yeltsin's decree imposing a state of emergency in the region. "Now we can speak only about complete secession (from Russia) and the beginning of building our relations as equals," Gen.
NEWS
November 11, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The strongman who now controls the predominantly Muslim Chechen-Ingush region of southern Russia went a step further Sunday by saying that only full secession will satisfy him. Russian Federation lawmakers, meanwhile, debated President Boris N. Yeltsin's decree imposing a state of emergency in the region. "Now we can speak only about complete secession (from Russia) and the beginning of building our relations as equals," Gen.
NEWS
November 10, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a potentially explosive showdown over their right to secede, militant nationalists in the mountainous, largely Muslim Chechen-Ingush region held their ground Saturday against Russian troop reinforcements and ignored the state of emergency decreed by Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin.
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