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NEWS
January 30, 1992 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new U.S. and Russian arms initiatives represent a breathtaking acceleration of efforts to curb nuclear weapons but contain significant differences that will require hard bargaining despite the warming post-Cold War climate. Most important, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin did not agree to the key condition in President Bush's initiative: eliminating multiple warheads from land-based missiles. He didn't even use the words, or their rough acronym, MIRV, in his speech.
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NEWS
May 7, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and Ukraine agreed Wednesday to a deal that would bind Ukraine, Kazakhstan and Belarus to get rid of all atomic weapons on their territory, leaving Russia the only nuclear-equipped state on the territory of the former Soviet Union. But Kazakhstan and Belarus have not yet agreed, and President Bush--reflecting increased U.S. concern over the issue--said he may send Secretary of State James A. Baker III to the new republics "to hammer out some of the differences."
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NEWS
May 7, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and Ukraine agreed Wednesday to a deal that would bind Ukraine, Kazakhstan and Belarus to get rid of all atomic weapons on their territory, leaving Russia the only nuclear-equipped state on the territory of the former Soviet Union. But Kazakhstan and Belarus have not yet agreed, and President Bush--reflecting increased U.S. concern over the issue--said he may send Secretary of State James A. Baker III to the new republics "to hammer out some of the differences."
NEWS
January 30, 1992 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new U.S. and Russian arms initiatives represent a breathtaking acceleration of efforts to curb nuclear weapons but contain significant differences that will require hard bargaining despite the warming post-Cold War climate. Most important, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin did not agree to the key condition in President Bush's initiative: eliminating multiple warheads from land-based missiles. He didn't even use the words, or their rough acronym, MIRV, in his speech.
NEWS
June 15, 1996
Key facts on Russia's presidential election, to be held Sunday. * Term: Four years; limited to two consecutive terms. * Powers: Serves as head of state, commander-in-chief; holds codes for Russia's nuclear weapons; has some legislative powers; must suspend or cancel membership in any political party while in office. * Candidate: Must be a Russian citizen at least 35 years old, full-time resident in Russia for at least 10 years. * Number of voters: 105 million (Voting age is 18.
NEWS
September 9, 1997 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alexander I. Lebed, the former Russian general and presidential hopeful, has been broadcasting his claim over the past week that Russia has lost track of 100 nuclear bombs the size of suitcases. "A very thorough investigation is necessary," Lebed reiterated to reporters Monday. "The state of nuclear security in Russia poses a danger to the whole world." The general's allegations are roundly denied by Russian officials, who contend that all of Russia's nuclear weapons are safely under control.
NEWS
October 28, 1997 | From Associated Press
The Clinton administration is investigating the unauthorized sale of advanced computers to Russia, concerned that they may have been used in Russia's nuclear weapons program. "We view that as a very serious matter," State Department spokesman James P. Rubin said Monday. The government had rejected permission for the sale but, according to a New York Times report, 16 IBM computers were secretly provided to a Russian nuclear weapons factory by a Moscow company.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1999
Robert Scheer's Feb. 23 Column Left ("End of Welfare Isn't the End of Poor People") correctly points out that 20% of the U.S. population is still poor even though welfare rolls are dropping. Poverty has been at roughly that level ever since the late 1960s. Before this, prosperous times helped poverty levels steadily decline from about 50% during the Great Depression to 20% in the 1960s. What stopped this steady improvement? The federal government dramatically reduced incentives for poor people to work.
OPINION
October 9, 2004
Re "Finally, U.S. Gets a Nuclear Umbrella," Oct. 3: Heritage Foundation fellow Baker Spring writes, "The American people must insist that their government defend them against ... current threats." It seems that the folks at the Heritage Foundation overlook that the most successful terrorist attacks on U.S. soil were in Oklahoma City using fertilizer and the World Trade Center using box cutters and our planes. While the current administration is wasting money on "Star Wars," our ports and borders are virtually unprotected, our policies are making more terrorists and who knows where Russia's nuclear weapons are. It is the drivel that the Heritage Foundation gives to Bush et al that seems to be the American people's current threat.
NEWS
April 8, 1992 | Associated Press
An American company struck a deal Tuesday with Russia's top nuclear weapons and energy laboratory to help sell ex-Soviet military technology to the West. New York-based National Patent Development Corp. pledged $1 million to launch the joint venture with the Kurchatov Institute of Atomic Energy in Moscow, which employs 10,000 nuclear experts.
NEWS
April 8, 2002 | CAROL GRAHAM and MICHAEL O'HANLON, Carol Graham and Michael O'Hanlon, fellows at the Brookings Institution, are co-authors of "A Half Penny on the Federal Dollar: The Future of Development Aid" (Brookings, 1997).
Just as President Richard M. Nixon was able to use his conservative credentials to fend off critics and go to China, President Bush has just announced a policy change that Republicans have opposed for years but that is long overdue. Starting next year, Bush intends to expand U.S. development aid for poor countries, eventually reaching $15 billion annually, or about a 50% increase from current levels. He would channel that additional assistance to countries that have adopted sound economic policies.
WORLD
May 14, 2002 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To generations who came of age during the Cold War, the nuclear arms agreement announced Monday by U.S. and Russian officials has the ring of a once-impossible dream. Thousands of nuclear weapons would be removed from arsenals that defined decades of hostility between the United States and the former Soviet Union. But the agreement encountered immediate criticism that it fails to address the more realistic, post-Cold War threats that the United States faces.
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