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NEWS
March 19, 1999 | Associated Press
In Russia's latest scandal, a brief video apparently showing the prosecutor general having sex with two prostitutes aired on state television Thursday after President Boris N. Yeltsin ordered lawmakers to fire the man and they refused. The broadcast presumably aimed to force the prosecutor to bend to the Russian leader's order and leave office. But support for the embattled prosecutor, Yuri I. Skuratov, only seems to be growing, pushing Yeltsin into yet another confrontation with parliament.
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SPORTS
February 8, 2014 | By Philip Hersh
SOCHI, Russia - About three hours before the Olympic caldron was lighted Friday night, media at the Fisht Olympic Stadium received a list of names of the past Russian Olympians who would be the final torchbearers. The list had five names. There were six final torchbearers. The missing name was that of Irina Rodnina, the three-time Olympic figure skating pairs champion who joined three-time Olympic champion hockey goalie Vladislav Tretiak in igniting the caldron that will burn in the Olympic Park until Feb. 23. Given the controversy that has erupted over Rodnina's selection for that role, was the omission an attempt to delay criticism?
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NEWS
September 8, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During a 900-day siege that cost almost 700,000 lives here, the Nazis failed to fight their way into this city's center. But five decades later, home-grown fascists now claim St. Petersburg as the "spiritual center" of their nationwide movement. The fascists' leader is a police detective whose heroes are Josef Stalin, Adolf Hitler and Arnold Schwarzenegger. Their chief ideologist is a 23-year-old who teaches university Polish and writes ultranationalist tracts in her spare time.
WORLD
December 22, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- Mikhail Khodorkovsky, the former oil tycoon once considered President Vladimir Putin's most potent political foe, said Sunday that he had no plans to resume his business or political activities or to support Russia's embattled opposition forces. In a televised interview from Berlin, where he was whisked Friday after his release from prison, Khodorkovsky also said he has no plans to return to Russia in the near future. He gave little hint of what his future holds other than to say he would remain in Germany for now while his mother undergoes medical treatment there.
NEWS
October 11, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Russian Federation leadership fell into further political brawling on Thursday as a power struggle sharpened in the Soviet Union's largest republic, deepening the crisis that had appeared to be on its way to resolution with the failure of the conservative coup d'etat in August . Russian Vice President Alexander V. Rutskoi, in an angry public confrontation with the head of the republic's KGB, denounced the security chief as lazy and incompetent, a danger to the state.
NEWS
August 22, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Boris N. Yeltsin was dead wrong. Addressing the U.S. Congress on a June, 1992, visit to Washington, the Russian president declared: "The world can sigh in relief; the idol of communism--which spread social strife, enmity and unparalleled brutality everywhere, which instilled fear in humanity--has collapsed. . . . I am here to assure you: We shall not let it rise again in our land!"
NEWS
March 8, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bracing for a major showdown this week with the Russian Parliament, President Boris N. Yeltsin has solicited and won support for the principle of strong presidential rule from Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn, considered by Russians to be their country's greatest living writer. "Yes, the Russian Federation with its size and diversity cannot exist without a strong presidential authority, which should be no weaker than that of the United States," Solzhenitsyn wrote from his home in Cavendish, Vt.
NEWS
October 3, 1993 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Right-wing demonstrators battled Moscow police Saturday in the most serious clash of Russia's 13-day political crisis even as negotiators for President Boris N. Yeltsin and his parliamentary opposition reached a tentative agreement aimed at settling their standoff. The accord would set a two-day schedule for the reduction of armed forces confronting each other at the Parliament building, where legislators have been barricaded in defiance of Yeltsin's Sept. 21 order to disband Parliament.
NEWS
October 5, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Following Moscow's bloodiest political battle since the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917, the leaders of a 13-day parliamentary rebellion surrendered Monday after tanks punched holes in the Russian White House and left it aflame. As the Parliament building burned, hundreds of "White House defenders" streamed out of the blackened marble fortress with their hands on their heads. Soldiers loyal to President Boris N.
NEWS
May 28, 1992 | VIKTOR K. GREBENSHIKOV, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Yegor K. Ligachev, once the second-most-powerful man in the Kremlin, on Wednesday called his former boss and comrade, Mikhail S. Gorbachev, a coward and a traitor. "I met many Communists who spent decades in labor camps in the permafrost zone but retained their faith in the party," the erstwhile Politburo hard-liner said. "I fail to understand its general secretary who spent three days in the best health resort the country has by the warm sea, then called for its dissolution."
WORLD
July 8, 2009 | Megan K. Stack
reporting from moscow On U.S. missile defense plans 'I know Russia opposes the planned configuration for missile defense in Europe. And my administration is reviewing these plans to enhance the security of America, Europe and the world. And I've made it clear that this system is directed at preventing a potential attack from Iran. It has nothing to do with Russia. In fact, I want to work together with Russia on a missile defense architecture that makes us all safer.
WORLD
May 2, 2002 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Communist leader Gennady A. Zyuganov, perspiration beading on his forehead, climbed down from the speaker's platform Wednesday after a speech urging the government's resignation, and posed with elderly supporters. It had been a fair-sized May Day rally, yet there still was a sense of futility written on his ruddy face.
NEWS
July 15, 2001 | From Associated Press
Legislation to permit limited sales of land cleared an important hurdle in Russia's lower house of parliament Saturday despite opposition from Communists. On the second of three readings, the State Duma voted 253 to 152 to approve a new land code. The code, which covers only sales of nonfarm land, is being pushed by President Vladimir V. Putin but is opposed by left-wing legislators who want to keep the ban on private land ownership that existed during Communist rule.
NEWS
April 13, 2001 | Times Wire Services
The mayor of Moscow said Thursday that he will merge his political party with parliament's main pro-Kremlin party, further strengthening President Vladimir V. Putin's grip on Russian politics. Putin welcomed the plan by Mayor Yuri M. Luzhkov, founder of the Fatherland-All Russia party, and Sergei K. Shoigu, the head of the pro-Kremlin Unity party. Luzhkov was known as a foe of the Kremlin during the tenure of President Boris N. Yeltsin but has expressed support for Putin.
NEWS
April 4, 2001 | Associated Press
President Vladimir V. Putin admitted Tuesday that his government has done little to raise low living standards and warned that Russia's overreliance on raw material exports puts it at the mercy of swings in the world economy. In his annual state of the nation address, Putin urged economic reform, warning that the alternative "is a road to economic and social stagnation." Putin delivered the speech to the political elite in the Kremlin's Marble Hall.
NEWS
February 10, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first night in the prison cell was the worst. Sometime in the darkness the Russian businessman opened his eyes suddenly, his mind a whirling panic, like a Tom Wolfe character on a downward spiral. But for media proprietor Vladimir A. Gusinsky, this was worse than a novel. This was a Russian jail, and he was terrified. He was sure the authorities, whom he had so frequently criticized, could do whatever they pleased. "I had this moment of inner weakness," he recalled.
NEWS
September 27, 1999 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. foreign affairs specialists are monitoring the potential for increased cooperation between Russia, China and India, amid a growing conviction in all three countries, especially after NATO's bombing campaign against Yugoslavia, that U.S. power must somehow be checked. Although agreeing that the three nations are far from coalescing into a pan-Eurasian, anti-NATO axis, the analysts remain concerned about what they call a nightmare scenario: an alliance that would bring together about 2.
NEWS
April 2, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia's foreign minister likens him to Gulliver, a giant plagued by Lilliputians. To his enemies, the president is more like a cross between a bully and the village drunk. Whatever Russians' views, Boris Nikolayevich Yeltsin, so far the only democratically chosen leader in their 1,000-year-old history, is running for his political life, pursued by a growing army of ultranationalists, reactionaries and Marxist-Leninists.
NEWS
December 29, 2000 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was born in the waning days of one century, endured a second and, with a little luck, will soon greet a third. "True, I lived only 95 days in the 19th century," Boris Yefimov says with sly modesty. "And then together with the rest of the planet I entered the 20th century. We could not have suspected that it would be so awful, so troubled, so unprecedented in human history." Yefimov is no ordinary centenarian--and not just because he is an eminent political cartoonist.
NEWS
December 16, 2000 | From Associated Press
Russian tax authorities filed lawsuits demanding the liquidation of the private media company Media-Most, officials said Friday, as the company's beleaguered chief, Vladimir A. Gusinsky, sought bail from a Spanish jail. The civil suits submitted by Tax Inspectorate officials to the Moscow Arbitration Court demanded the dissolution of Media-Most and its flagship NTV television for insolvency, a court spokesman said. NTV is the country's only private nationwide channel.
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