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NEWS
September 17, 1995 | From Associated Press
Concerned about a population decline, the region surrounding Russia's fourth-largest city has begun offering cash rewards to women who bear children. The modest payments are not likely to make female residents of Nizhny Novgorod want to rush out and get pregnant, however. Under a newly issued regional decree reported Saturday by the Itar-Tass news agency, mothers will be paid the equivalent of $225 for their first child and $292 for their second.
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NEWS
May 6, 2001 | SARAH KARUSH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Spanning 11 time zones from the Baltic Sea to the Bering Strait, Russia has abundant reserves of oil, gas, metals and diamonds. But one precious resource is dwindling: people. For years, demographers have been warning that Russia's spiraling population decline will have broad ramifications for the country's future. Now the government is scrambling to come up with ways to counter the drop.
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NEWS
May 6, 2001 | SARAH KARUSH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Spanning 11 time zones from the Baltic Sea to the Bering Strait, Russia has abundant reserves of oil, gas, metals and diamonds. But one precious resource is dwindling: people. For years, demographers have been warning that Russia's spiraling population decline will have broad ramifications for the country's future. Now the government is scrambling to come up with ways to counter the drop.
NEWS
September 17, 1995 | From Associated Press
Concerned about a population decline, the region surrounding Russia's fourth-largest city has begun offering cash rewards to women who bear children. The modest payments are not likely to make female residents of Nizhny Novgorod want to rush out and get pregnant, however. Under a newly issued regional decree reported Saturday by the Itar-Tass news agency, mothers will be paid the equivalent of $225 for their first child and $292 for their second.
NEWS
April 6, 2008 | Douglas Birch, Associated Press
When they decided to have their first child, Alexander Gorlov and Laila Simanova discovered something new was afoot in post-Soviet Russia: a baby boom. Simanova, 31, now five months pregnant, said she was surprised by how many of her friends were becoming pregnant as well. When she signed up with the Pre-Natal Medical Center in Moscow, she found it swamped with expectant mothers. "The doctors said when they opened two years ago, we could have played football in the halls," she said.
SPORTS
September 26, 2013 | By David Wharton
With the Olympic torch relay set to begin this weekend, the International Olympic Committee has given a final vote of approval to Sochi, the host of the upcoming Winter Games. IOC officials made their last inspection of the Black Sea resort this week, visiting the coastal facilities and the venues in the mountains. “We often say that there is no time to waste as the clock ticks down to the opening ceremony, and this still stands true,” said Jean-Claude Killy, the former skier who now serves as IOC coordination commission chairman.
NEWS
August 21, 1999 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don't go looking for trouble, a Russian saying goes. These days, the Kremlin appears to be applying the lesson in an unusual area: the census. Russia has postponed--indefinitely--a national census scheduled for this year. It would have been the first full census since the breakup of the Soviet Union and was expected to confirm demographers' worst fears: that Russians are dying off so fast and giving birth so infrequently that the population may shrink by nearly half in the next 50 years.
NEWS
March 16, 2008 | Alex Rodriguez, Chicago Tribune
Healthcare is supposed to be free in Russia, but Russians know that every hospital has its under-the-table price list. That's why the family of Khazerya Ziyayetdinova, a 70-year-old woman suffering from severe bedsores, brought cash every time they visited her at Hospital 67 in Moscow. To have Ziyayetdinova recover in a room instead of the hallway, relatives slipped an orderly $300. They paid nurses $20 to give injections, change bedpans and unclog catheters. Every chat with Ziyayetdinova's doctor cost $40. "Our healthcare system is still in the Middle Ages," said Vera Pavlova, Ziyayetdinova's daughter-in-law, sitting in her home in this small town 54 miles southwest of Moscow.
NEWS
July 15, 2007 | Maria Danilova, Associated Press
When Karen Papiyants lost his leg in a road accident last year, his medical nightmare was only beginning. Although like any Russian he was entitled to free treatment, he says the doctors strongly suggested he pay $4,500 into their St. Petersburg hospital's bank account, or be deprived proper care -- and perhaps even of survival. Faced with that choice, the truck driver's relatives scrambled to scrape together the money.
SPORTS
November 20, 2009 | By Chuck Culpepper
In the lame history of lame stunts by lame politicians regarding upcoming sporting events, there finally has come a creative turn. Rising so very far above the dreaded lame wager between mayors or governors or legislators, the 46-year-old Slovenian Prime Minister Borut Pahor promised that if Slovenia could shock Russia to reach the 2010 World Cup in South Africa, he would shine the players' shoes. Well, when little Slovenia (population 2 million) did shock big Russia (population 140 million)
OPINION
July 23, 2000 | Walter Russell Mead, Walter Russell Mead, a contributing editor to Opinion, is a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. He is the author of "Mortal Splendor: The American Empire in Transition."
'I don't want to participate in the destruction of Russia," Boris A. Berezovsky said last week, explaining his decision to step down from the Russian parliament. It's a bit late for that. Berezovsky has already done his personal best to ruin that unhappy land.
NEWS
March 7, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a live international Internet interview, Russian President Vladimir V. Putin's voice, often distorted or broken up, sounded like something from the era of early radio, not the latest that computer technology has to offer. But with questions from Murmansk in far northern Russia, San Diego and Canberra, Australia, Putin's Internet forum Tuesday was unusual for a Kremlin leader who normally only gives news conferences to a few handpicked journalists.
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