Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRussia Reform
IN THE NEWS

Russia Reform

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 27, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The political movement that helped bring Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin to power a year ago is threatening to split, with its radicals accusing Yeltsin of failing to carry out the deep reforms he promised.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
February 27, 2005 | Stephen F. Cohen, Stephen F. Cohen, professor of Russian studies at New York University, is the author (with Katrina vanden Heuvel) of "Voices of Glasnost: Conversations With Gorbachev's Reformers" (W.W Norton, 1990) and, most recently, of "Failed Crusade: America and the Tragedy of Post-Communist Russia" (W.W. Norton, 2001).
The most important events of the late 20th century began to unfold nearly 20 years ago on March 11, 1985, when Mikhail S. Gorbachev became leader of the Soviet Union. Within a few weeks of his rise to power, the full-scale reformation he hoped to carry out inside his country and in its Cold War relations with the West was underway.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 22, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"What beasts our civil servants are!" --Nikolai Gogol, "Diary of a Madman" In this birthplace of V. I. Lenin, the most noxious reminder of the Communist past is not the giant bald statue still towering above the Volga River, or the ration coupons still doled out for meat and butter. It is the fact that many people still live in fear. They don't fear the KGB, they don't fear the Communist Party; those days are truly gone.
NEWS
August 25, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the last inhabitant of Tyutchevo village dies, the electricity authorities will snip the wire leading to the last house and roll it up before the thieves get to it. The flowers and grasses will thicken over the track to the village until it is lost. Tyutchevo, once a settlement of about 73 houses, has shrunk to a single person in a crooked wood-and-clay cottage: Maria Lyovina, age 82.
NEWS
July 22, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a 20-year exile in the West and an eight-week rail trek across Russia, Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn returned to Moscow on Thursday night with a litany of complaints from his compatriots and a grim verdict that this country and its reforms are "in big, heavy and multifaceted trouble." "Nobody expected that the way out of communism would be painless, but nobody expected it would be so painful," Russia's greatest living writer declared.
NEWS
November 6, 1998 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The turmoil in Russia's economy after years of Western-backed reform has so shaken the international development community that its entire approach to aiding Moscow has become an open question.
NEWS
December 14, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Openly horrified by massive voter support for a fanatical neo-fascist, Russia's top reformers on Monday proclaimed their willingness to join with just about any party--even the Communists--to battle the menace from the right. As preliminary results from Sunday's nationwide parliamentary elections rolled in, flamboyant ultranationalist Vladimir V. Zhirinovsky appeared to be trouncing the sober reformers of President Boris N. Yeltsin's government.
NEWS
January 13, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As President Clinton begins his first official visit to Moscow, his Administration views the coming days as a make-or-break period for the massive reform being undertaken across Russia. "This is a critical juncture for the Russian government," Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen said here after a day of private meetings with Russian leaders and diplomats from the Group of Seven nations. "Major decisions are being made in the next few days."
NEWS
February 7, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His predecessor tried mightily to charm the West, but Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin seems to want to scare it. In dire tones and with ever-increasing urgency, he is telling the world: Help me now, or tyranny will again return to Russia. In the ornate Salle des Fetes at the Paris City Hall, before a well-heeled crowd of dignitaries and Paris glitterati, the towering, 61-year-old Siberian was blunter than ever on Thursday.
NEWS
March 18, 1997 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin lured a potential presidential successor into his camp Monday, appointing a charismatic young governor to a powerful post in his Cabinet. Yeltsin's surprise move, on the eve of his summit in Finland with President Clinton, gave the job of first deputy premier to Boris Y. Nemtsov, the popular 37-year-old governor of Nizhny Novgorod--who not long ago was leading protests against nuclear power and Yeltsin's war in Chechnya.
NEWS
November 6, 1998 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The turmoil in Russia's economy after years of Western-backed reform has so shaken the international development community that its entire approach to aiding Moscow has become an open question.
NEWS
July 22, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The woe-is-me countenance of Yuri Skomorokhov could be said to be the face of capitalist Russia. A successful business, a supportive family and a home in this verdant Volga River boomtown have yet to disabuse the 35-year-old entrepreneur of his conviction that Russia's turn of history forced him to sell his soul.
NEWS
March 18, 1997 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin lured a potential presidential successor into his camp Monday, appointing a charismatic young governor to a powerful post in his Cabinet. Yeltsin's surprise move, on the eve of his summit in Finland with President Clinton, gave the job of first deputy premier to Boris Y. Nemtsov, the popular 37-year-old governor of Nizhny Novgorod--who not long ago was leading protests against nuclear power and Yeltsin's war in Chechnya.
NEWS
January 18, 1995 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian Foreign Minister Andrei V. Kozyrev pledged Tuesday night that the war in Chechnya will not divert Russia from its policies of fostering democracy and economic reforms, according to State Department officials. During the first of two days of talks with Secretary of State Warren Christopher, the Russian official also said his boss, President Boris N. Yeltsin, will take steps to rebuild his political base among reformers in Russia, aides to Christopher reported.
NEWS
August 22, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"What beasts our civil servants are!" --Nikolai Gogol, "Diary of a Madman" In this birthplace of V. I. Lenin, the most noxious reminder of the Communist past is not the giant bald statue still towering above the Volga River, or the ration coupons still doled out for meat and butter. It is the fact that many people still live in fear. They don't fear the KGB, they don't fear the Communist Party; those days are truly gone.
NEWS
July 22, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a 20-year exile in the West and an eight-week rail trek across Russia, Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn returned to Moscow on Thursday night with a litany of complaints from his compatriots and a grim verdict that this country and its reforms are "in big, heavy and multifaceted trouble." "Nobody expected that the way out of communism would be painless, but nobody expected it would be so painful," Russia's greatest living writer declared.
NEWS
July 22, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The woe-is-me countenance of Yuri Skomorokhov could be said to be the face of capitalist Russia. A successful business, a supportive family and a home in this verdant Volga River boomtown have yet to disabuse the 35-year-old entrepreneur of his conviction that Russia's turn of history forced him to sell his soul.
NEWS
August 25, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the last inhabitant of Tyutchevo village dies, the electricity authorities will snip the wire leading to the last house and roll it up before the thieves get to it. The flowers and grasses will thicken over the track to the village until it is lost. Tyutchevo, once a settlement of about 73 houses, has shrunk to a single person in a crooked wood-and-clay cottage: Maria Lyovina, age 82.
NEWS
January 13, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As President Clinton begins his first official visit to Moscow, his Administration views the coming days as a make-or-break period for the massive reform being undertaken across Russia. "This is a critical juncture for the Russian government," Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen said here after a day of private meetings with Russian leaders and diplomats from the Group of Seven nations. "Major decisions are being made in the next few days."
NEWS
December 14, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Openly horrified by massive voter support for a fanatical neo-fascist, Russia's top reformers on Monday proclaimed their willingness to join with just about any party--even the Communists--to battle the menace from the right. As preliminary results from Sunday's nationwide parliamentary elections rolled in, flamboyant ultranationalist Vladimir V. Zhirinovsky appeared to be trouncing the sober reformers of President Boris N. Yeltsin's government.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|