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February 16, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Clad in fatigues and a beret, the Chechen commander laughs, kicks one prostrate Russian soldier, waves a pistol in the air, then steps up to a kneeling soldier and shoots him in the head. Salautdin Temirbulatov, 41, was convicted and sentenced to life in prison Thursday on evidence created by his own men: an April 1996 videotape of him executing the soldier, Sergei Mitryayev.
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NEWS
April 27, 2002 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Russian state security service made public Friday a videotape of a corpse to back up its assertions that a prominent Islamic guerrilla leader had been killed last month in Chechnya. The tape, shown by the state-controlled ORT and RTR networks, showed the body of a long-haired, bushy-bearded, Arab-looking man closely resembling previously published photographs of Khattab, the Jordanian-born guerrilla leader.
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NEWS
March 19, 1995 | MATT BIVENS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If Russian forces have suffered heavy casualties in their three-month war with secessionist Chechnya, they can start by thanking themselves. Across the breakaway republic, Russian troops are selling weapons to the very rebels they have been sent to defeat. "It's nonsense. They sell us weapons that are used to kill them," said Lom-Ali Shamayev, a 34-year-old Chechen businessman with a New York address who bankrolls his own band of 116 guerrillas.
NEWS
April 26, 2002 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Russian intelligence service says it's true--but no one else seems to be buying it just yet. Even President Vladimir V. Putin sounded dubious Thursday about claims that one of Moscow's most hated enemies had been killed in Chechnya. Islamic guerrilla leader Khattab is to Russians roughly what Osama bin Laden and the Taliban's Mullah Mohammed Omar have become to Americans: a sworn, ruthless nemesis who always seems maddeningly just out of reach.
NEWS
October 5, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Following Moscow's bloodiest political battle since the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917, the leaders of a 13-day parliamentary rebellion surrendered Monday after tanks punched holes in the Russian White House and left it aflame. As the Parliament building burned, hundreds of "White House defenders" streamed out of the blackened marble fortress with their hands on their heads. Soldiers loyal to President Boris N.
NEWS
February 13, 1995 | MATT BIVENS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Olga Ryabtseva was at work, keeping the books at a school in a village in Russia's Krasnodar region, when a strange man from Chechnya called her on the phone about her son. "He said my son was a POW," Ryabtseva remembered. "He said: 'He was wounded, but he's past the worst. Come to our village and get him. We'll meet you.'
NEWS
August 5, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
Chechen rebels who kidnapped two Russian colonels decapitated them and left their heads at a Russian base in Chechnya, the Kremlin said Friday. The colonels had been seized several days ago in the Vedeno region, deep in the rugged southern mountains where the rebels are concentrated. The rebel Web site on Friday carried a proposal to trade them for a Russian officer accused of raping and killing a Chechen girl.
NEWS
September 13, 2000 | Associated Press
Rebels shot and seriously wounded a top Russian general and killed at least six other soldiers in a series of ambushes in Russian-held areas of Chechnya, officials said Tuesday. The rebels shot up Maj. Gen. Anatoly Mikh's car Monday outside Gudermes, the headquarters of Chechnya's pro-Russian administration, Kremlin spokesman Sergei V. Yastrzhembsky said. Mikh was hit by five bullets, while his driver and an officer were also wounded, Yastrzhembsky said.
NEWS
August 25, 1999 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian forces took control Tuesday of five Dagestani villages that had been seized nearly three weeks ago by fundamentalist Islamic rebels, though the guerrillas declared that their fighters had pulled out before the Russians moved in. Russian military officials claimed Tuesday to have crushed the rebellion, meeting a two-week deadline that new Prime Minister Vladimir V. Putin had set for resolving the crisis in the Caucasus region.
NEWS
December 31, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chechnya's biggest oil refinery complex burned out of control Friday after reportedly being struck by Russian bombers, and Chechen officials warned that the blaze could spread to a nearby tank containing 5,000 tons of explosive ammonia. "If it catches fire, an ecological disaster will hit the entire North Caucasus," a Chechen Foreign Ministry official told Interfax news agency.
NEWS
April 23, 2002 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Less than two weeks after announcing new safeguards to prevent abuses, the Russian military launched a large-scale operation in Chechnya that was marked by beatings, looting, electric shock torture and at least two extrajudicial killings, residents and human rights workers say. The rules announced March 29, known as Order 80, were supposed to prevent abuses by allowing local officials to observe operations and requiring soldiers to identify themselves and keep public lists of detainees.
NEWS
March 30, 2002 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first broad effort to curb "disappearances" and other abuses in occupied Chechnya, Russian military leaders issued new instructions ordering troops to treat civilians politely, identify themselves during raids and keep public records of all detainees, officials said Friday. In announcing the new rules, known as Order 80, the commander of Russia's armed forces in the separatist republic acknowledged for the first time that disappearances are an endemic problem.
NEWS
March 10, 2002 | From Reuters
Russian troops hunted down rebels in Chechnya on Saturday in a fresh series of "special operations," Russia's media reported. News agencies, quoting the military in the separatist southern region of Russia, said government forces had killed 10 insurgents during several days of the operations and detained more than 80 people accused of taking part in or aiding rebel activities. Two senior rebel commanders were killed, the media said.
NEWS
January 28, 2002 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Russian military helicopter with a deputy interior minister and several other officers aboard exploded and crashed in Chechnya on Sunday, killing all 14 passengers and crew, and first reports indicated that it might have been downed in a rebel attack. Among those killed was Gen.
NEWS
January 19, 2002 | From Associated Press
A Kremlin aide denied Friday that his office had issued orders to underreport troop casualties in Chechnya. Meanwhile, rebel attacks continued with a car bombing and an assault on a Chechen mayor. Human rights groups have long accused the military of hiding losses in the 28-month-old war in the breakaway republic.
NEWS
January 16, 2002 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia's leading human rights group says it has documented the apparent killing of three men and the disappearance of six others during a Russian "special operation" in Chechnya over the New Year's holidays. "As interviews with local residents make clear, the special operation was carried out with the crudest violations of human rights and the law," the chairman of the group Memorial, Oleg Orlov, wrote in a letter to Vsevolod Chernov, the chief prosecutor of the separatist republic.
NEWS
December 30, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG and SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Russian bombers hit a giant petroleum complex in Chechnya on Thursday, striking at the oil industry that is this breakaway republic's economic lifeblood. And as Russian warplanes and troops using laser-guided missiles intensified their attacks on the besieged city, Chechen President Dzhokar M. Dudayev reportedly told the Kremlin that he is ready for peace talks.
NEWS
January 26, 1997 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Picking their way through the crowded market past peacetime election banners, the homemakers of this Chechen town are singing along with songs of war. "Why do you Russians tell untruths?" one Mideastern-sounding ditty blares from a stall selling unlabeled cassettes. "The whole world knows you'll never conquer Chechnya. You won't make your homes here; that was ordained long ago. Come here and you'll die like a dog, and you'll die when you're drunk.
NEWS
January 7, 2002 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Human rights workers are collecting what they describe as mounting evidence that Russian troops committed unjustified killings and other abuses during military operations in two towns in separatist Chechnya over the last eight days. Usam Baisayev, deputy director of the regional office of the Russian human rights group Memorial, said the first military operation began in the town of Tsotsin-Yurt on Dec. 30 and appeared to target Chechen men.
NEWS
December 9, 2001 | From Associated Press
Two prosecutors in Chechnya were killed Saturday when their car was blown up by a remote-controlled land mine in the capital, Grozny, officials said. In a separate incident, assailants fatally shot a Chechen policeman after breaking into his house in the chaotic Russian region's second-largest city, Gudermes, an official in Chechnya's Moscow-backed administration said.
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