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NEWS
January 26, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 78 years after Bolsheviks executed Czar Nicholas II and his family, the relics of Russia's last royal family retain the power to haunt. A government commission appointed to identify and inter the remains of the Romanovs has become fearful of declaring the bones--unearthed in 1991 near the execution site in the Ural Mountains city of Yekaterinburg--those of the slain imperial family.
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NEWS
July 17, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By air, by hearse and by shoulder, the remains of Russia's last czar and his family ended their tortured 20th century journey home to this imperial capital Thursday for a belated burial on today's 80th anniversary of the Romanovs' deaths before a Bolshevik firing squad.
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NEWS
April 30, 1992 | NATALIA SHULYAKOVSKAYA and CAREY GOLDBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Under the majestic golden dome of St. Isaac's Cathedral, several thousand Russians paid their final respects Wednesday to Grand Duke Vladimir Kirillovich, the heir to the Romanov throne, in the country's first royal funeral service in more than seven decades. Alexi II, patriarch of the Russian Orthodox Church, led the five-hour memorial rite, replete with heavy incense and hundreds of tapers.
NEWS
January 31, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia's last czar and the family and servants who died with him should be buried with imperial grandeur in their native St. Petersburg on July 17--80 years to the day after their execution--a special state panel ruled Friday. The recommendation to Russian President Boris N.
NEWS
February 3, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Innocently, they arranged themselves as if posing for a family picture: the czarina and the sickly young czarevich sitting, the czar and the four pretty grand duchesses arrayed around them with the family doctor and servants. Then the bullets flew. Screams. Moans. Ricochets. The thrusts of bayonets and thumps of rifle butts. Eventual silence. Blood on the cellar room's walls and floor.
NEWS
July 10, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
British scientists said they are convinced that bones unearthed in eastern Russia are those of the last czar, his wife and three of their children. Members of the imperial family, the Romanovs, were executed under orders from Soviet founder V. I. Lenin in the aftermath of the Russian Revolution, historians say.
NEWS
November 7, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A hush fell over the crowd at the ornate St. Isaak's Cathedral on Wednesday night as a 74-year-old Romanov, the pretender to the Russian imperial throne, bowed his head and kissed a cross hanging from the neck of Patriarch Alexei II, the head of the Russian Orthodox Church.
NEWS
January 31, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia's last czar and the family and servants who died with him should be buried with imperial grandeur in their native St. Petersburg on July 17--80 years to the day after their execution--a special state panel ruled Friday. The recommendation to Russian President Boris N.
NEWS
March 20, 1994 | Reuters
The remains of seven members of Russia's last imperial family, the Romanovs, will be given a formal burial July 3 if government officials sanction it, a senior Russian Orthodox Church official said. The ceremony would take place at the Cathedral of the Peter and Paul Fortress in St. Petersburg, the church official, Metropolitan Ioann, told a local newspaper.
NEWS
June 23, 1992 | From Associated Press
Scientists have determined that two skeletons unearthed in a Siberian city are those of murdered Czar Nicholas II and his wife, Alexandra, solving a 74-year-old mystery, a researcher said Monday. The remains of the czar and czarina were among nine skeletons dug up last summer from a pit in Yekaterinburg, said researcher Alexander Blokhin. A third skeleton was identified as that of the Romanov family doctor, Sergei Botkin, he said.
NEWS
January 26, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 78 years after Bolsheviks executed Czar Nicholas II and his family, the relics of Russia's last royal family retain the power to haunt. A government commission appointed to identify and inter the remains of the Romanovs has become fearful of declaring the bones--unearthed in 1991 near the execution site in the Ural Mountains city of Yekaterinburg--those of the slain imperial family.
NEWS
March 20, 1994 | Reuters
The remains of seven members of Russia's last imperial family, the Romanovs, will be given a formal burial July 3 if government officials sanction it, a senior Russian Orthodox Church official said. The ceremony would take place at the Cathedral of the Peter and Paul Fortress in St. Petersburg, the church official, Metropolitan Ioann, told a local newspaper.
NEWS
July 10, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
British scientists said they are convinced that bones unearthed in eastern Russia are those of the last czar, his wife and three of their children. Members of the imperial family, the Romanovs, were executed under orders from Soviet founder V. I. Lenin in the aftermath of the Russian Revolution, historians say.
NEWS
February 3, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Innocently, they arranged themselves as if posing for a family picture: the czarina and the sickly young czarevich sitting, the czar and the four pretty grand duchesses arrayed around them with the family doctor and servants. Then the bullets flew. Screams. Moans. Ricochets. The thrusts of bayonets and thumps of rifle butts. Eventual silence. Blood on the cellar room's walls and floor.
NEWS
July 18, 1992 | Reuters
Russians lit candles and chanted prayers for Czar Nicholas II and his murdered family Friday as the anniversary of their assassination was marked for the first time with official approval. In the former imperial capital, St. Petersburg, 600 members of Orden, the Russian Imperial Union that seeks to restore the monarchy, held a memorial service on the steps of Kazan Cathedral. Some carried black, gold and white czarist flags, while others held portraits of the czar and his German-born wife.
NEWS
July 12, 1992 | PETER JAMES SPIELMANN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
For more than 70 years, Russian monarchists have fantasized that Romanov Princess Anastasia survived the Bolshevik assassination of Czar Nicholas II and his family and escaped to the West. Now writer Edvard Radzinsky's obsession with the last days of the doomed czar has uncovered a new twist: a theory that 14-year-old Crown Prince Alexei lived through the hail of bullets on July 16, 1918, and spent years in a Soviet asylum after World War II.
NEWS
July 17, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By air, by hearse and by shoulder, the remains of Russia's last czar and his family ended their tortured 20th century journey home to this imperial capital Thursday for a belated burial on today's 80th anniversary of the Romanovs' deaths before a Bolshevik firing squad.
NEWS
July 18, 1992 | Reuters
Russians lit candles and chanted prayers for Czar Nicholas II and his murdered family Friday as the anniversary of their assassination was marked for the first time with official approval. In the former imperial capital, St. Petersburg, 600 members of Orden, the Russian Imperial Union that seeks to restore the monarchy, held a memorial service on the steps of Kazan Cathedral. Some carried black, gold and white czarist flags, while others held portraits of the czar and his German-born wife.
NEWS
June 23, 1992 | From Associated Press
Scientists have determined that two skeletons unearthed in a Siberian city are those of murdered Czar Nicholas II and his wife, Alexandra, solving a 74-year-old mystery, a researcher said Monday. The remains of the czar and czarina were among nine skeletons dug up last summer from a pit in Yekaterinburg, said researcher Alexander Blokhin. A third skeleton was identified as that of the Romanov family doctor, Sergei Botkin, he said.
NEWS
April 30, 1992 | NATALIA SHULYAKOVSKAYA and CAREY GOLDBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Under the majestic golden dome of St. Isaac's Cathedral, several thousand Russians paid their final respects Wednesday to Grand Duke Vladimir Kirillovich, the heir to the Romanov throne, in the country's first royal funeral service in more than seven decades. Alexi II, patriarch of the Russian Orthodox Church, led the five-hour memorial rite, replete with heavy incense and hundreds of tapers.
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