Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRussia Schools
IN THE NEWS

Russia Schools

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 2, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dressed as an American cowgirl in fringed jacket and boots and bearing gladioli for her teacher, Ksenya Vasilyeva stood at attention Wednesday in the largest collective ritual to survive the Soviet era--the opening of schools throughout Russia all on the same day. But when the yawn-inspiring welcome speeches ended and 8:30 a.m.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1997 | DADE HAYES
A private San Fernando Valley foundation that replaced asphalt at a Burbank elementary school with an environmental science park has announced plans to expand the park program to schools in New York and Russia. The Alliance for Children's Trust Foundation of Toluca Lake broke ground on the Burbank project in 1993, vowing to bring its opportunities for at-risk students to other U.S. cities.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1997 | DADE HAYES
A private San Fernando Valley foundation that replaced asphalt at a Burbank elementary school with an environmental science park has announced plans to expand the park program to schools in New York and Russia. The Alliance for Children's Trust Foundation of Toluca Lake broke ground on the Burbank project in 1993, vowing to bring its opportunities for at-risk students to other U.S. cities.
NEWS
October 21, 1996 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yuliya Parkhomenko scratched her head anxiously when asked what she knew about Vladimir I. Lenin, the founder of the Soviet Union, whose bearded likeness could until recently be seen on any wall or town square and whose name was added, mantra-like, to the names of most Soviet institutions. "Lenin?" the 10-year-old repeated with wonder. "Well . . . he's dead. . . ." She paused, fidgeting with her blond braid. Suddenly a huge grin lighted up her face.
NEWS
October 21, 1996 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yuliya Parkhomenko scratched her head anxiously when asked what she knew about Vladimir I. Lenin, the founder of the Soviet Union, whose bearded likeness could until recently be seen on any wall or town square and whose name was added, mantra-like, to the names of most Soviet institutions. "Lenin?" the 10-year-old repeated with wonder. "Well . . . he's dead. . . ." She paused, fidgeting with her blond braid. Suddenly a huge grin lighted up her face.
NEWS
September 25, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the class of 1995, the world will never look quite the same. This month, thousands of Russian high school juniors and seniors are being handed a book that could have gotten them arrested a decade ago. It is the first post-Soviet textbook of 20th-Century world history. Unlike its predecessors, this text is written in plain Russian, shunning Soviet-speak. It is determinedly devoid of ideology.
NEWS
September 4, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Move over, Miami: The newest hotbed of Cuban dissident activity is the longtime capital of world communism. Cubans who were sent to Moscow to become the ideological and technical cadre of Fidel Castro's regime ended up catching democratic fever as they watched Russia reject communism. Now as many as 500 Cubans living in the former Soviet Union are refusing to return to Cuba.
NEWS
March 3, 1996 | DAVE CARPENTER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Alyosha, an impish-looking 5-year-old, eats caviar for breakfast, gets massages regularly and plays computer games. And that's not even the coolest stuff at his $8,500-a-year kindergarten. "We have nice toys and a swimming pool," he tells a visitor to his school with a shy smile. Prompted by his teacher, he adds: "Classes, too."
OPINION
July 19, 2002
Russia has just adopted a new legal code that enshrines the principles of habeas corpus and the presumption of innocence. Capital has stopped fleeing the country and investment has begun to trickle in. Ford Motor Co. recently opened what is believed to be Russia's first foreign-owned large industrial facility. Yet as Russia finds its economic footing, a problem of a different sort is growing.
WORLD
February 3, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW - Was it the influence of video games? A breakdown in respect for authority? Cuts in mental health services? In a phenomenon all too familiar to Americans, Russians searched for answers Monday after a 15-year-old student at a Moscow high school fatally shot a teacher and a police officer and held a class of 29 captive until he was persuaded by his father to release those in the room, officials said. Police then arrested him. The student reportedly was armed with a shotgun and possibly another weapon.
NEWS
March 3, 1996 | DAVE CARPENTER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Alyosha, an impish-looking 5-year-old, eats caviar for breakfast, gets massages regularly and plays computer games. And that's not even the coolest stuff at his $8,500-a-year kindergarten. "We have nice toys and a swimming pool," he tells a visitor to his school with a shy smile. Prompted by his teacher, he adds: "Classes, too."
NEWS
September 25, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the class of 1995, the world will never look quite the same. This month, thousands of Russian high school juniors and seniors are being handed a book that could have gotten them arrested a decade ago. It is the first post-Soviet textbook of 20th-Century world history. Unlike its predecessors, this text is written in plain Russian, shunning Soviet-speak. It is determinedly devoid of ideology.
NEWS
September 2, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dressed as an American cowgirl in fringed jacket and boots and bearing gladioli for her teacher, Ksenya Vasilyeva stood at attention Wednesday in the largest collective ritual to survive the Soviet era--the opening of schools throughout Russia all on the same day. But when the yawn-inspiring welcome speeches ended and 8:30 a.m.
NEWS
September 4, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Move over, Miami: The newest hotbed of Cuban dissident activity is the longtime capital of world communism. Cubans who were sent to Moscow to become the ideological and technical cadre of Fidel Castro's regime ended up catching democratic fever as they watched Russia reject communism. Now as many as 500 Cubans living in the former Soviet Union are refusing to return to Cuba.
NEWS
December 25, 1995 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the women storm in, full of frost and fury, Valentina Bunina fixes her face in a professional frown. She knows what will follow: tears, moans, anguish and despair. "When will we have heat?" the women cry, tugging tight their wool scarves. They shove their way into the tiny town hall, eight of them, then a dozen, then more. "If we could just have a little warmth, just a little . . . ," one pleads. Another scolds sharply: "We're dying here! We're freezing to death!
Los Angeles Times Articles
|